Characterization of #cefotaxime #resistant #urinary #Escherichia coli from primary care in South-West #England 2017–18 (J Antimicrob Chemother., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Characterization of cefotaxime-resistant urinary Escherichia coli from primary care in South-West England 2017–18

Jacqueline Findlay, Virginia C Gould, Paul North, Karen E Bowker, Martin O Williams, Alasdair P MacGowan, Matthew B Avison

Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, dkz397, https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkz397

Published: 20 September 2019

 

Abstract

Objectives

Third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli from community-acquired urinary tract infections are increasingly reported worldwide. We sought to determine and characterize the mechanisms of cefotaxime resistance employed by urinary E. coli obtained from primary care, over 12 months, in Bristol and surrounding counties in South-West England.

Methods

Cefalexin-resistant E. coli isolates were identified from GP-referred urine samples using disc susceptibility testing. Cefotaxime resistance was determined by subsequent plating onto MIC breakpoint plates. β-Lactamase genes were detected by PCR. WGS was performed on 225 isolates and analyses were performed using the Center for Genomic Epidemiology platform. Patient information provided by the referring general practices was reviewed.

Results

Cefalexin-resistant E. coli (n = 900) isolates were obtained from urines from 146 general practices. Following deduplication by patient approximately 69% (576/836) of isolates were cefotaxime resistant. WGS of 225 isolates identified that the most common cefotaxime-resistance mechanism was blaCTX-M carriage (185/225), followed by plasmid-mediated AmpCs (pAmpCs) (17/225), AmpC hyperproduction (13/225), ESBL blaSHV variants (6/225) or a combination of both blaCTX-M and pAmpC (4/225). Forty-four STs were identified, with ST131 representing 101/225 isolates, within which clade C2 was dominant (54/101). Ciprofloxacin resistance was observed in 128/225 (56.9%) of sequenced isolates, predominantly associated with fluoroquinolone-resistant clones ST131 and ST1193.

Conclusions

Most cefalexin-resistant E. coli isolates were cefotaxime resistant, predominantly caused by blaCTX-M carriage. The correlation between cefotaxime resistance and ciprofloxacin resistance was largely attributable to the high-risk pandemic clones ST131 and ST1193. Localized epidemiological data provide greater resolution than regional data and can be valuable for informing treatment choices in the primary care setting.

Issue Section: ORIGINAL RESEARCH

© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model)

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Cephalosporins; Fluoroquinolones; E. Coli; UTI; Cefalexin; Cefotaxime; UK; England.

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Complete Nucleotide #Sequence of a Novel #Plasmid Bearing the High-Level #Tigecycline #Resistance Gene, tet(X4) (Antimicrob Agents Chemother., abstract)

[Source: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Complete Nucleotide Sequence of a Novel Plasmid Bearing the High-Level Tigecycline Resistance Gene, tet(X4)

Liang-Xing Fang, Chong Chen, Dong-Ling Yu, Ruan-Yang Sun, Chao-Yue Cui, Liang Chen, Xiao-Ping Liao, Ya-Hong Liu, Jian Sun

DOI: 10.1128/AAC.01373-19

 

ABSTRACT

We reported the complete nucleotide sequence of a tet(X4)-carrying plasmid, pSTB20-1T, from a tigecycline-resistant Escherichia coli isolate in China. Sequence analysis indicated that pSTB20-1T contains a hybrid plasmid backbone and a tet(X4)-containing multidrug resistance region, likely originated through recombination of multiple plasmids. tet(X4) was flanked by two ISCR2, which may be responsible for tet(X4) mobilization. The occurrence and transmission of this novel hybrid plasmid may exacerbate the spread of the clinically significant tet(X4) gene.

Copyright © 2019 American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; E. Coli; Tigecycline; China.

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Conjugative IncX 1 #plasmid harboring #colistin #resistance gene #mcr-5.1 in #E coli isolated from #chicken rice retailed in #Singapore (Antimicrob Agents Chemother., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Conjugative IncX 1 plasmid harboring colistin resistance gene mcr-5.1 in E. coli isolated from chicken rice retailed in Singapore

Siyao Guo, Moon Y.F. Tay, Aung Kyaw Thu, Kelyn Lee Ghee Seow, Yang Zhong, Lee Ching Ng, Joergen Schlundt

DOI: 10.1128/AAC.01043-19

 

ABSTRACT

Colistin is regarded as one of the last resort antimicrobials to Gram-negative bacterial infection (1).…

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Copyright © 2019 American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Colistin; MCR5; Plasmids; Food Safety; Singapore.

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A novel #plasmid-mediated #polymyxin #resistance determinant (#mcr-1.8) in #Escherichia coli recovered from broiler #chickens in #Brunei Darussalam (J Antimicrob Chemother., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

A novel plasmid-mediated polymyxin resistance determinant (mcr-1.8) in Escherichia coli recovered from broiler chickens in Brunei Darussalam

Muhd Haziq F Abdul Momin, Apostolos Liakopoulos, David C Bean, Lynette M Phee,David W Wareham

Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, dkz352, https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkz352

Published: 23 August 2019

Issue Section: Research letter

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Sir,

MDR Gram-negative bacteria are identified as critical pathogens and their effective treatment increasingly relies on the polymyxins (polymyxin B, colistin), either alone or as part of unorthodox combination therapies.1 The rapid emergence of polymyxin resistance due to mutations/insertions in genes involved in LPS modifications (lpxCAD, pmrA/B, mgrB, phoP/Q, ccrAB) has been reported among individuals exposed to or treated with polymyxins.1 Of greater concern are increasing reports of resistance due to the acquisition of phosphoethanolamine (PEtN) transferases, enzymes that catalyse the addition of phosphoethanolamine to lipid A, resulting in lower binding affinity of polymyxins.1

(…)

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© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model)

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; MCR1; Polymyxins; Poultry; Brunei.

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Spread of #NDM-5 and #OXA-181 #carbapenemase-producing #Escherichia coli in #Chad (Antimicrob Agents Chemother., abstract)

[Source: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Spread of NDM-5 and OXA-181 carbapenemase-producing Escherichia coli in Chad

Oumar Ouchar Mahamat, Manon Lounnas, Mallorie Hide, Abelsalam Tidjani, Julio Benavides, Abibatou Diack, Calèbe Somasse, Kadidja Gamougam, Christian Carrière, Dominique Decré,Anne-Laure Bañuls, Hélène Jean-Pierre, Yann Dumont, Fabrice Compain, Sylvain Godreuil

DOI: 10.1128/AAC.00646-19

 

ABSTRACT

We detected for the first time blaNDM-5 and blaOXA-181 in E. coli isolates from hospitalized patients and healthy volunteers in Chad. These resistance genes were located on IncX3 and IncF plasmids. Despite E. coli clone large diversity, the identified resistant intestinal isolates belonged mainly to the same sequence type.

Copyright © 2019 American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Carbapenem; E. Coli; NDM5; Chad.

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Emergence of a hybrid #plasmid derived from IncN1-F33:A−:B− and #mcr-1-bearing plasmids mediated by IS26 (J Antimicrob Chemother., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Emergence of a hybrid plasmid derived from IncN1-F33:A−:B− and mcr-1-bearing plasmids mediated by IS26

Dandan He, Yingying Zhu, Ruichao Li, Yushan Pan, Jianhua Liu, Li Yuan,Gongzheng Hu

Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, dkz327, https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkz327

Published: 30 July 2019

 

Abstract

Objectives

To characterize the complete sequences of four plasmids in MCR-1-producing clinical Escherichia coli strain D72, and to depict the formation mechanism and characteristics of the cointegrate plasmid derived from the pD72-mcr1 and pD72-F33 plasmids.

Methods

The genetic profiles of plasmids in strain D72 and its transconjugant were determined by conjugation, S1-PFGE, Southern hybridization, WGS analysis and PCR. Plasmid sequences were analysed with bioinformatic tools. The traits of the fusion plasmid were characterized by cointegration, stability and conjugation assays.

Results

Strain D72, belonging to ST1114, contained four plasmids, including mcr-1-carrying pD72-mcr1, blaCTX-M-55-carrying pD72-F33, blaTEM-238-bearing pD72-IncP and pD72-IncX1 carrying aph(3′)-Ia, qnrS2 and floR. A single plasmid, pD72C, in the transconjugant was found to be larger than any plasmid in the original strain D72. Sequence analysis showed that pD72C was the fusion product of pD72-mcr1 and pD72-F33, and the recombinant event involved an intermolecular replicative mechanism. Plasmid fusion occurred at a frequency of 1.75 × 10−4 cointegrates per transconjugant. The fusion plasmid presented a high stability and conjugation frequency of 8.00 × 10−3.

Conclusions

To our knowledge, this is the first report of the IS26-mediated fusion of an IncN1-F33:A−:B− plasmid and an mcr-1-carrying phage-like plasmid, providing evidence for the important role of IS26 in the recombination of plasmids. The biological advantages of the fusion plasmid indicated that the fusion event presumably plays a potential role in the dissemination of mcr-1.

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Colistin; E. Coli; MCR1; Plasmids.

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Co-occurrence of #mcr1 and #mcr3 #genes in a single #Escherichia coli in #NZ (J Antimicrob Chemother., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Co-occurrence of mcr-1 and mcr-3 genes in a single Escherichia coli in New Zealand

Julie Creighton, Trevor Anderson, Julia Howard, Kristin Dyet, Xiaoyun Ren,Joshua Freeman

Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, dkz311, https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkz311

Published: 24 July 2019

Issue Section: Research letter

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Sir,

The discovery of the plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene mcr-1, first identified in 2015 among both clinical and animal isolates in China, raised concerns about pan-resistant bacteria.1 A plethora of publications quickly followed, suggesting mcr-1 was already established in many countries and across many continents, in various bacterial species, on a variety of plasmids types, and in bacteria isolated from diverse animal species, environmental sources and human health settings.2 Furthermore, several other mcr-like genes and gene variants have since been discovered.2,3

Colistin is among a diminishing group of antimicrobial agents available for…

(…)

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© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model)

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Colistin; E. Coli; New Zealand.

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