Detection of #colistin #resistance #mcr-1 gene in #Salmonella enterica serovar Rissen isolated from #mussels, #Spain, 2012­ to 2016 (Euro Surveill., abstract)

[Source: Eurosurveillance, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Detection of colistin resistance mcr-1 gene in Salmonella enterica serovar Rissen isolated from mussels, Spain, 2012­ to 2016

Antonio Lozano-Leon1,2, Carlos Garcia-Omil1, Jacobo Dalama1, Rafael Rodriguez-Souto1, Jaime Martinez-Urtaza3, Narjol Gonzalez-Escalona4

Affiliations: 1 ASMECRUZ Laboratory. Playa de Beluso s/n 36939, Pontevedra, Spain; 2 CI8 Research Group. Department Chemistry and Food Analysis, University of Vigo, As Lagoas-Marcosende 36310 Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain; 3 Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), Barrack Road, Weymouth, Dorset, United Kingdom; 4 Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Food and Drug Administration, College Park, Maryland, United States

Correspondence:  Antonio Lozano-Leon

Citation style for this article: Lozano-Leon Antonio, Garcia-Omil Carlos, Dalama Jacobo, Rodriguez-Souto Rafael, Martinez-Urtaza Jaime, Gonzalez-Escalona Narjol. Detection of colistin resistance mcr-1 gene in Salmonella enterica serovar Rissen isolated from mussels, Spain, 2012­ to 2016. Euro Surveill. 2019;24(16):pii=1900200. https://doi.org/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2019.24.16.1900200

Received: 20 Mar 2019;   Accepted: 16 Apr 2019

 

Abstract

Nineteen Salmonella strains were isolated from 5,907 randomly selected mussel samples during a monitoring programme for the presence of Salmonella in shellfish in Galicia, north-west Spain (2012–16). Serovars, sequence type and antimicrobial resistance genes were determined through genome sequencing. Presence of the mcr-1 gene in one strain belonging to serovar Rissen and ST-469 was identified. The mcr-1 gene had not been isolated previously in environmental Salmonella isolated from mussels in Spain.

©  This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Colistin; MCR1; Salmonella enterica; Spain.

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#Synergistic effect of #colistin combined with PFK-158 against colistin-resistant #Enterobacteriaceae (Antimicrob Agents Chemother., abstract)

[Source: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Synergistic effect of colistin combined with PFK-158 against colistin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae

Youwen Zhang, Xiukun Wang, Xue Li, Limin Dong, Xinxin Hu, Tongying Nie, Yun Lu, Xi Lu, Jing Pang, Guoqing Li, Xinyi Yang, Congran Li, Xuefu You

DOI: 10.1128/AAC.00271-19

 

ABSTRACT

As increasing numbers of colistin-resistant bacteria emerge, new therapies are urgently needed to treat infections caused by these pathogens. The discovery of new combination therapies is one important way to solve such problems. Herein, we report that the antitumor drug PFK-158 and its analogs PFK-015 and 3PO can exert synergistic effects with colistin against colistin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, including mcr-1 positive or high-level colistin resistant (HLCR) isolates, as shown by a checkerboard assay. The results of a time-killing assay revealed that colistin combined with PFK-158 continuously eliminated colistin-resistant Escherichia coli 13-43, Klebsiella pneumoniae H04 and Enterobacter cloacae D01 in 24 h. Images from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) 5 h post-inoculation confirmed the killing effect of the combination. Finally, the in vivo treatment showed that PFK-158 had a better synergistic effect than its analogs. Compared to the corresponding rates after colistin monotherapy, the survival rates of systemically infected mice were significantly increased 30% or 60% when the mice received an intravenous injection of colistin in combination with 15 mg/kg PFK-158. These results have important implications for repurposing PFK-158 to combat colistin resistance.

Copyright © 2019 American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Enterobacteriaceae; MCR1; Colistin.

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Most #domestic #livestock possess #colistin-resistant commensal #Escherichia coli harboring #mcr in a rural community in #Vietnam (Antimicrob Agents Chemother., abstract)

[Source: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Most domestic livestock possess colistin-resistant commensal Escherichia coli harboring mcr in a rural community in Vietnam

Ryuji Kawahara, Yoshihiro Fujiya, Takahiro Yamaguchi, Diep Thi Khong, Thang Nam Nguyen, Hoa Thi Tran, Yoshimasa Yamamoto

DOI: 10.1128/AAC.00594-19

 

ABSTRACT

Colistin is recognized as the last resort for treatment of life-threatening infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria; however, the increasing prevalence of colistin-resistant bacteria harboring the mobile colistin resistance gene (mcr) poses a threat to the treatment (1).…

Copyright © 2019 American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Colistin; E. Coli; Livestock; Vietnam; MCR1.

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#Escherichia coli harboring #mcr1 in a cluster of #liver #transplant recipients: detection through active surveillance and #WGS (Antimicrob Agents Chemother., abstract)

[Source: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Escherichia coli harboring mcr-1 in a cluster of liver transplant recipients: detection through active surveillance and whole genome sequencing

Nenad Macesic, Sabrina Kahn, Marla J. Giddins, Daniel Freedberg, Susan Whittier, Daniel Green, E. Yoko Furuya, Elizabeth C. Verna, Medini K. Annavajhala, Angela Gomez-Simmonds,Anne-Catrin Uhlemann

DOI: 10.1128/AAC.02680-18

 

ABSTRACT

Mcr-1, a plasmid-associated gene for colistin resistance, was first described in China in 2015 but its spread in the United States is unknown. We report detection of mcr-1-carrying E. coliST117 in a cluster of three liver transplant recipients.

Copyright © 2019 American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Colistin; MCR1; E. Coli; USA.

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Increased #prevalence of #Escherichia coli strains from #food carrying #blaNDM and #mcr1-bearing #plasmids that structurally resemble those of clinical strains, #China, 2015 to 2017 (Euro Surveill., abstract)

[Source: Eurosurveillance, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Increased prevalence of Escherichia coli strains from food carrying blaNDM and mcr-1-bearing plasmids that structurally resemble those of clinical strains, China, 2015 to 2017

Xiaobo Liu1,2, Shu Geng2, Edward Wai-Chi Chan1,3, Sheng Chen1,3

Affiliations: 1 Shenzhen Key Lab for Food Biological Safety Control, Food Safety and Technology Research Center, Hong Kong PolyU Shen Zhen Research Institute, Shenzhen, China; 2 College of Food Science and Engineering, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi, China; 3 The State Key Lab of Chirosciences, Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR

Correspondence:  Sheng Chen

Citation style for this article: Liu Xiaobo, Geng Shu, Chan Edward Wai-Chi, Chen Sheng. Increased prevalence of Escherichia coli strains from food carrying blaNDM and mcr-1-bearing plasmids that structurally resemble those of clinical strains, China, 2015 to 2017. Euro Surveill. 2019;24(13):pii=1800113. https://doi.org/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2019.24.13.1800113

Received: 12 Mar 2018;   Accepted: 07 Jul 2018

 

Abstract

Introduction

Emergence of resistance determinants of blaNDM and mcr-1 has undermined the antimicrobial effectiveness of the last line drugs carbapenems and colistin.

Aim

This work aimed to assess the prevalence of blaNDM and mcr-1 in E. coli strains collected from food in Shenzhen, China, during the period 2015 to 2017.

Methods

Multidrug-resistant E. coli strains were isolated from food samples. Plasmids encoding mcr-1 or blaNDM genes were characterised and compared with plasmids found in clinical isolates.

Results

Among 1,166 non-repeated cephalosporin-resistant E. coli strains isolated from 2,147 food samples, 390 and 42, respectively, were resistant to colistin and meropenem, with five strains being resistant to both agents. The rate of resistance to colistin increased significantly (p < 0.01) from 26% in 2015 to 46% in 2017, and that of meropenem resistance also increased sharply from 0.3% in 2015 to 17% in 2017 (p < 0.01). All meropenem-resistant strains carried a plasmid-borne blaNDM gene. Among the colistin-resistant strains, three types of mcr-1-bearing plasmids were determined. Plasmid sequencing indicated that these mcr-1 and blaNDM-bearing plasmids were structurally similar to those commonly recovered from clinical isolates. Interestingly, both mcr-1-bearing and blaNDM-bearing plasmids were transferrable to E. coli strain J53 under selection by meropenem, yet only mcr-1-bearing plasmids were transferrable under colistin selection.

Conclusion

These findings might suggest that mobile elements harbouring mcr-1 and blaNDM have been acquired by animal strains and transmitted to our food products, highlighting a need to prevent a spike in the rate of drug resistant food-borne infections.

©  This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; E. Coli; Colistin; Carbapenem; MCR1; Plasmids; Food safety; China.

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Conjugal Transfer, #WGS, and #Plasmid Analysis of Four #mcr1–bearing Isolates from #US Patients (Antimicrob Agents Chemother., asbtract)

[Source: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Conjugal Transfer, Whole Genome Sequencing, and Plasmid Analysis of Four mcr-1–bearing Isolates from U.S. Patients

Wenming Zhu, Adrian Lawsin, Rebecca L. Lindsey, Dhwani Batra, Kristen Knipe, Brian B. Yoo, K. Allison Perry, Lori A. Rowe, David Lonsway, Maroya S. Waters, J. Kamile Rasheed, Alison Laufer Halpin

DOI: 10.1128/AAC.02417-18

 

ABSTRACT

Four Enterobacteriaceae clinical isolates bearing mcr-1 gene-harboring plasmids were characterized. All isolates demonstrated the ability to transfer colistin resistance to E. coli;plasmids were stable in conjugants after multiple passages on non–selective media. mcr-1 was located on an IncX4 (n=3) or IncN (n=1) plasmid. The IncN plasmid harbored 13 additional antimicrobial resistance genes. Results indicate the mcr-1-bearing plasmids in this study are highly transferable in vitro and stable in the recipients.

This is a work of the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. Foreign copyrights may apply.

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; USA; E. Coli; Enterobacteriaceae; Colistin; MCR1.

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Updated #Prevalence of #mcr-like Genes among #Escherichia coli and #Klebsiella pneumoniae in SENTRY Program and Characterization of mcr-1.11 Variant (Antimicrob Agents Chemother., abstract)

[Source: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Updated Prevalence of mcr-like Genes among Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in SENTRY Program and Characterization of mcr-1.11 Variant

Lalitagauri M. Deshpande, Cory Hubler, Andrew P. Davis, Mariana Castanheira

DOI: 10.1128/AAC.02450-18

 

ABSTRACT

Increased prevalence of infections caused by Gram-negative pathogens that are multidrug resistant has prompted the reconsideration of polymyxins as therapeutic options.…

Copyright © 2019 American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Polymyxins; MCR1.

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