Investigation of an #outbreak of acute #respiratory #disease in an #indigenous village in #Brazil: Contribution of #Influenza A #H1N1pdm09 and human #RSV (PLoS One, abstract)

[Source: PLoS One, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

OPEN ACCESS /  PEER-REVIEWED / RESEARCH ARTICLE

Investigation of an outbreak of acute respiratory disease in an indigenous village in Brazil: Contribution of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and human respiratory syncytial viruses

Andrey Moreira Cardoso  , Paola Cristina Resende , Enny S. Paixao , Felipe G. Tavares , Yasmin N. Farias , Carla Tatiana G. Barreto , Lídia N. Pantoja , Fernanda L. Ferreira , André Luiz Martins , Ângela Barbosa Lima , Daniella A. Fernandes , Patrícia Machado Sanches , Walquiria A. F. Almeida , Laura C. Rodrigues , Marilda M. Siqueira

___

Published: July 8, 2019 / DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0218925

 

Abstract

Analyses of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic and post-pandemic years showed high attack rates and severity among indigenous populations. This study presents the characteristics of the first documented influenza outbreak in indigenous peoples in Brazil, that occurred from 30th March to 14th April 2016 in a Guarani village in Southeast Region. Acute respiratory infections were prospectively investigated. The majority of the 73 cases were influenza-like illness (ILI) (63.0%) or severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) (20.5%). The ILI+SARI attack rate (35.9%) decreased with increasing age. There was a high influenza vaccination rate (86.3%), but no statistically significant difference in vaccination rates between severe and non-severe cases was seen (p = 0.334). Molecular analyses of 19.2% of the cases showed 100% positivity for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and/or hRSV. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 was included in the 6B.1 genetic group, a distinct cluster with 13 amino acid substitutions of A/California/07/2009-like. The hRSV were clustered in the BA-like genetic group. The early arrival of the influenza season overlapping usual hRSV season, the circulation of a drifted influenza virus not covered by vaccine and the high prevalence of risk factors for infection and severity in the village jointly can explain the high attack rate of ARI, even with a high rate of influenza vaccination. The results reinforce the importance of surveillance of respiratory viruses, timely vaccination and controlling risk factors for infection and severity of in the indigenous populations in order to preventing disease and related deaths, particularly in children.

___

Citation: Cardoso AM, Resende PC, Paixao ES, Tavares FG, Farias YN, Barreto CTG, et al. (2019) Investigation of an outbreak of acute respiratory disease in an indigenous village in Brazil: Contribution of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and human respiratory syncytial viruses. PLoS ONE 14(7): e0218925. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0218925

Editor: Eric HY Lau, The University of Hong Kong, CHINA

Received: September 27, 2018; Accepted: June 13, 2019; Published: July 8, 2019

Copyright: © 2019 Cardoso et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Data Availability: Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 sequences obtained in this study were deposited in the Global Initiative on Sharing All Influenza Data (GISAID) database under the accession numbers EPI_ISL_271538, EPI_ISL_271539, EPI_ISL_274050, EPI_ISL_274051 and EPI_ISL_274061 and the hRSV strains in Genbank under the accession numbers (MH719234 and MH719235). Meritorious proposals for access to data will be considered subject to ethical and legal restrictions, the terms of the original informed consent agreement with participant community, and Guarani community protocols for authorizing studies. Due to the small size of the study community, the minimal dataset cannot be adequately anonymized to permit open access while protecting participants’ identities. Data requests may be sent to Reinaldo Souza dos Santos, Head of Department, Departamento de Endemias Samuel Pessoa, Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, located at Rua Leopoldo Bulhões 1480, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21041-210, Brazil. Phone: +55 (21) 2598-2683. Email: rssantos@ensp.fiocruz.br.

Funding: This project was funded by the following institutions: Received by AMC – National Research Council (CNPq – www.cnpq.br) Universal 14/2011 – 47.4008/2011-8 and CNPq Universal 01/2016 – 428284/2016-7; Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz – www.fiocruz.br) – INOVA ENSP II 2013 – 25388.000556/2013-52, PAPES VII – Young scientist 2014 – 401789/2015-2 and ENSP 2016/2018 – 25388.000526/2017-70; Research Foundation of the State of Rio de Janeiro (FAPERJ – www.faperj.br) PPSUS FAPERJ/SES-RJ/MS-DECIT/CNPq 35/2013-E-26/110.275/2014; and Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior – Brasil (CAPES – www.capes.gov.br) – Finance Code 001; Received by MMS – CNPq Universal 431975/2016-7, used for the molecular analysis. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Competing interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Keywords: Seasonal Influenza; H1N1pdm09; RSV; SARI; Brazil.

——

Advertisements

#GBS and its correlation with #dengue, #Zika and #chikungunya viruses #infection based on a literature review of reported cases in #Brazil (Acta Trop., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Acta Trop. 2019 Jun 17:105064. doi: 10.1016/j.actatropica.2019.105064. [Epub ahead of print]

Guillain-Barre Syndrome and its correlation with dengue, Zika and chikungunya viruses infection based on a literature review of reported cases in Brazil.

de Sousa Lima ME1, Rodrigues Bachur TP2, Frota Aragão G3.

Author information: 1 Curso de Medicina, Universidade Estadual do Ceará, Campus Itaperi, Av. Dr. Silas Munguba, 1700 – Itaperi, Fortaleza, CE, CEP 60.714-903, Brazil. Electronic address: matheus.eugenio@aluno.uece.br. 2 Curso de Medicina, Universidade Estadual do Ceará, Campus Itaperi, Av. Dr. Silas Munguba, 1700 – Itaperi, Fortaleza, CE, CEP 60.714-903, Brazil. Electronic address: tatiana.bachur@uece.br. 3 Curso de Medicina, Universidade Estadual do Ceará, Campus Itaperi, Av. Dr. Silas Munguba, 1700 – Itaperi, Fortaleza, CE, CEP 60.714-903, Brazil; Núcleo de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento de Medicamentos, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Campus do Porangabuçu, Rua Cel. Nunes de Melo, 1000 – Rodolfo Teófilo, Fortaleza, CE, CEP 60.430-275, Brazil. Electronic address: gislei.frota@uece.br.

 

Abstract

Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is one of the main neurologic manifestations of arboviruses, especially Zika virus infection. As known, the prevalence of these diseases is high, so the risk of having an increase on GBS is relevant. The study purposes making a comparative survey between the involvement of dengue, Zika and chikungunya infections in the development of the GBS in Brazil, as well as search in literature resemblances and distinctions between beforehand reported cases. It was performed an electronic search in online databases, with articles published between the years of 2004 to 2018. A total of 729 articles about the proposed search were found, and 10 were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. The medium age found in Brazilian studies was 42,9. The time lapse for the neurological symptoms manifest was 6,5 to 11 days. Facial palsy, paresthesia and member weakness were the main symptoms related. Pediatric cases are rare. There are many studies that implicated the association of GBS and arboviruses and point it to one of the main neurological manifestation of these infections. More research and consistent data are needed to clarify unanswered questions and guide public health measures.

Copyright © 2019. Published by Elsevier B.V.

KEYWORDS: Guillain-Barre syndrome; Zika virus; chikungunya; dengue fever

PMID: 31220435 DOI: 10.1016/j.actatropica.2019.105064

Keywords: Arbovirus; GBS; Chikungunya fever, Zika Virus, Dengue fever, Brazil.

——

First report of collapsing variant of focal segmental #glomerulosclerosis triggered by #arbovirus: #dengue and #Zika virus #infection (Clin Kidney J., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Clin Kidney J. 2018 Nov 19;12(3):355-361. doi: 10.1093/ckj/sfy104. eCollection 2019 Jun.

First report of collapsing variant of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis triggered by arbovirus: dengue and Zika virus infection.

Araújo SA1,2, Cordeiro TME2, Belisário AR2, Araújo RFA1,2, Marinho PES3, Kroon EG3, de Oliveira DB4, Teixeira MM2,5, Simões E Silva AC2.

Author information: 1 Instituto de Nefro Patologia, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. 2 Laboratório Interdisciplinar de Investigação Médica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil. 3 Departamento de Microbiologia, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. 4 Faculdade de Medicina de Diamantina, Universidade Federal dos Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri, Diamantina, Brazil. 5 National Institute of Science and Technology in Dengue, Laboratory of Immunopharmacology, Institute of Biological Sciences, UFMG, Brazil.

 

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The collapsing variant of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is the most aggressive form of FSGS and is characterized by at least one glomerulus with segmental or global collapse and overlying podocyte hypertrophy and hyperplasia. Viruses can act as aetiological agents of secondary FSGS. This study aims to establish an aetiological link between dengue virus (DENV) infection and the collapsing variant of FSGS and to analyse possible influences of the apolipoprotein 1 (APOL1) gene risk alleles on the disease.

METHODS:

Biopsies and medical records were gathered from 700 patients of the Instituto de Nefropatologia, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Screening for the collapsing variant of FSGS was performed and serological, immunohistochemical, tissue polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and genetic analysis were conducted.

RESULTS:

Eight patients were identified with positive DENV serology and negative serological and/or tissue markers for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, Epstein-Barr virus, human immunodeficiency virus, cytomegalovirus and parvovirus B19. In PCR analysis, six patients had positive markers for DENV strain genetic material, one patient had positive markers for co-infection of Zika virus (ZIKV) and DENV and one patient had positive markers only for ZIKV infection. Six of the eight patients did not show risk alleles of the APOL1 gene. One patient had only one risk allele (G1) and the sample from another did not contain enough DNA for genetic analysis to be performed.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study provided strong evidence that DENV can infect renal tissue and possibly functions as a second hit to the development of the collapsing variant of FSGS. Nonetheless, this study also highlights the possible implication of ZIKV infection in FSGS and supports the argument that risk alleles of the APOL1 gene may not be implicated in the susceptibility to FSGS in these patients.

KEYWORDS: arbovirus; chronic kidney disease; dengue infection; focal segmental glomerulosclerosis; renal histopahology

PMID: 31198534 PMCID: PMC6543975 DOI: 10.1093/ckj/sfy104

Keywords: Arbovirus; Flavivirus; Dengue fever; Zika Virus; Brazil.

——

#Pregnancy outcomes and #mother-to-child #transmission rate in #HTLV-1/2 infected women attending two public hospitals in the metropolitan area of #Rio de Janeiro (PLoS Negl Trop Dis., abstract)

[Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

OPEN ACCESS /  PEER-REVIEWED / RESEARCH ARTICLE

Pregnancy outcomes and mother-to-child transmission rate in HTLV-1/2 infected women attending two public hospitals in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro

Danielle Bittencourt Sodré Barmpas  , Denise Leite Maia Monteiro , Stella Regina Taquette , Nádia Cristina Pinheiro Rodrigues , Alexandre José Baptista Trajano , Juliana de Castro Cunha , Camila Lattanzi Nunes , Lucia Helena Cavalheiro Villela , Sérgio A. M. Teixeira , Denise Cardoso das Neves Sztajnbok , Márcio Neves Bóia

___

Published: June 10, 2019 / DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0007404 / This is an uncorrected proof.

 

Abstract

HTLV-1/2 are transmitted sexually, by whole cell blood products and from mother-to-child (MTC), mainly through breastfeeding. HTLV-1/2 prevalence in pregnant women is high in Rio de Janeiro, however there were no local studies addressing the rate of adverse pregnancy outcomes (APO) and MTC transmission. The aim was to study sociodemographic characteristics which may be associated to HTLV-1/2 infection and describe pregnancy outcomes and MTC transmission in HTLV-1/2-positive women. The cross-sectional study screened 1,628 pregnant women in of Rio de Janeiro (2012–2014) and found 12 asymptomatic carrier mothers (prevalence = 0.74%). Pregnancy outcome information was retrieved from medical records. Sociodemographic characteristics were similar between the positive and negative groups except for maternal age, which was higher in carrier mothers. The incidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes was similar in infected and non-infected patients (p = 0.33), however there was a high rate of premature rupture of membranes (PROM) amid infected mothers (3/12). Multilevel logistic regression found that for each additional year of age, the chance of being HTLV-1/2-positive increased 11% and that having another sexually transmitted infection (STI) increased 9 times the chance of being infected. Carrier mothers had more antenatal visits (OR = 5.26). Among the children of HTLV-1/2-positive mothers there was one fetal death, one infant death and one loss of follow-up. After two years of follow-up there was one case of MTC transmission (1/9). The mother reported breastfeeding for one month only. Knowledge about factors associated to HTLV-1/2 infection, its impact on pregnancy outcomes and the MTC transmission rate is important to guide public health policies on antenatal screening and management.

 

Author summary

HTLV-1/2 are retroviruses transmitted by sex, blood products and from mother to child (MTC), mainly through breastfeeding. There is currently no vaccine, treatment or cure. Although it’s mostly asymptomatic it can cause disabling and even lethal diseases in carriers. The prevalence of HTLV-1/2 in pregnant women at the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro is high (0.74%). Our aim was to study the sociodemographic characteristics which may be associated to HTLV-1/2 infection and describe pregnancy outcomes and MTC transmission in the infected population. Apart from being slightly older, there were no differences in the carrier mothers’ sociodemographic profile. Pregnant women with sexually transmitted infections had a 9-fold chance of being HTLV-1/2 positive. Although adverse pregnancy outcomes were not increased, infected mothers had a high rate of ruptured membranes. Among the children of HTLV-1/2-positive mothers there was one fetal death, one infant death and one loss of follow-up. There was one case of MTC transmission (1/9), after one month of breastfeeding. Knowledge about factors associated to HTLV-1/2 infection, its impact on pregnancy, and the MTC transmission rate is important to guide further research and public health policies.

___

Citation: Sodré Barmpas DB, Monteiro DLM, Taquette SR, Rodrigues NCP, Trajano AJB, Cunha JdC, et al. (2019) Pregnancy outcomes and mother-to-child transmission rate in HTLV-1/2 infected women attending two public hospitals in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 13(6): e0007404. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0007404

Editor: Edgar M. Carvalho, Hospital Universitário Professor Edgard Santos, BRAZIL

Received: October 2, 2018; Accepted: April 22, 2019; Published: June 10, 2019

Copyright: © 2019 Sodré Barmpas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Data Availability: All relevant data are within the manuscript and its Supporting Information files.

Funding: This study was sponsored by the Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (FAPERJ, www.faperj.br), to Taquette SR and Monteiro DLM. Grant number E-26/110.351/2012). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Competing interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Keywords: Retrovirus; HTVL1; HTLV2; Pregnancy; Brazil.

——

#Human #coronavirus alone or in co-infection with #rhinovirus C is a #risk factor for #SARI and admission to the #PICU: A one-year study in Southeast #Brazil (PLoS One, abstract)

[Source: PLoS One, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

OPEN ACCESS /  PEER-REVIEWED / RESEARCH ARTICLE

Human coronavirus alone or in co-infection with rhinovirus C is a risk factor for severe respiratory disease and admission to the pediatric intensive care unit: A one-year study in Southeast Brazil

Alessandra K. Matsuno  , Talita B. Gagliardi , Flavia E. Paula, Luciano K. S. Luna, Bruna L. S. Jesus, Renato T. Stein, Davi C. Aragon, Ana P. C. P. Carlotti , Eurico Arruda

Published: June 3, 2019 / DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0217744

 

Abstract

Objective

We aimed to assess the profile of respiratory viruses in young children hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI) and its association with disease severity, defined as need for pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission.

Design

Prospective observational cohort study.

Setting

A tertiary-care university hospital in Brazil.

Patients

Children younger than three years attending the pediatric emergency room with ALRI who were admitted to the hospital.

Interventions

None.

Measurements and main results

Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from patients from June 1st, 2008 to May 31st, 2009within the first 48 hours of hospitalization. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were tested for 17 human respiratory viruses by molecular and immunofluorescence based assays. Simple and multiple log-binomial regression models were constructed to assess associations of virus type with a need for PICU admission. Age, prematurity, the presence of an underlying disease and congenital heart disease were covariates. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were positive for at least one virus in 236 patients. Rhinoviruses were detected in 85.6% of samples, with a preponderance of rhinovirus C (RV-C) (61.9%). Respiratory syncytial virus was detected in 59.8% and human coronavirus (HCoV) in 11% of the samples. Co-detections of two to five viruses were found in 78% of the patients. The detection of HCoV alone (adjusted relative risk (RR) 2.18; 95% CI 1.15–4.15) or in co-infection with RV-C (adjusted RR 2.37; 95% CI 1.23–4.58) was independently associated with PICU admission.

Conclusions

The detection of HCoV alone or in co-infection with RV-C was independently associated with PICU admission in young children hospitalized for ALRI.

___

Citation: Matsuno AK, Gagliardi TB, Paula FE, Luna LKS, Jesus BLS, Stein RT, et al. (2019) Human coronavirus alone or in co-infection with rhinovirus C is a risk factor for severe respiratory disease and admission to the pediatric intensive care unit: A one-year study in Southeast Brazil. PLoS ONE 14(6): e0217744. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0217744

Editor: Raymond J. Pickles, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, UNITED STATES

Received: October 2, 2018; Accepted: May 19, 2019; Published: June 3, 2019

Copyright: © 2019 Matsuno et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Data Availability: All relevant data are within the manuscript and its Supporting Information files.

Funding: AKM and EAN supported mainly by an academic grant from Abbott Laboratórios do Brasil Ltda based on an unrestricted investigator-generated proposal. EAN Additional funding was provided by a grant from the Sao Paulo State Research Foundation (FAPESP) and by FAEPA – “Fundação de Apoio ao Ensino Pesquisa e Assistência” (in English would be “Foundation of Support to Teaching Research and Assistance) of the University of Sao Paulo Hospital of Ribeirão Preto. EA has long standing scholarship support from the Brazilian Research Council (CNPq). The funder had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Competing interests: AKM and EAN were supported by an academic grant from Abbott Laboratórios do Brasil Ltda, based on an unrestricted investigator-generated proposal. This does not alter our adherence to PLOS ONE policies on sharing data and materials, as detailed online in the guide for authors: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/s/competing-interests).

Keywords: Coronavirus; Rhinovirus; SARI; Intensive Care; Pediatrics; Brazil.

——

#Family-Centered Early #Intervention Program for #Brazilian #Infants with #Congenital #Zika Virus #Syndrome: A Pilot Study (Phys Occup Ther Pediatr., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Phys Occup Ther Pediatr. 2019 May 30:1-13. doi: 10.1080/01942638.2019.1600100. [Epub ahead of print]

Family-Centered Early Intervention Program for Brazilian Infants with Congenital Zika Virus Syndrome: A Pilot Study.

Brandão MB1, Frota LMDCP1,2, Miranda JL2,3, Cavalcante Brasil RM2, Mancini MC1.

Author information: 1a Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences, School of Physical Education, Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy , Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG) , Belo Horizonte , Brazil. 2b Núcleo de Tratamento e Estimulação Precoce (NUTEP) , Fortaleza , Brazil. 3c Department of Maternal and Child Health , Universidade Federal do Ceará (UFC) , Fortaleza , Brazil.

 

Abstract

Aims:

To evaluate the effects of a 16-week program based on Goals-Activity-Motor Enrichment (GAME) principles on infants with congenital Zika virus syndrome (CZS)’s mother report of functional goal achievement, motor and cognitive abilities, home enrichment, and parents’ perceptions regarding the service provided.

Methods:

Quasi-experimental study with infants (n = 32) with CZS and their mothers. Twenty-two infants composed the GAME-based group and 10 were included in the control group. The primary outcome measure was the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Secondary outcome measures were the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, the Affordances in the Home Environment for Motor Development-Infant Scale, and the Measure of Processes of Care. All measures were performed by blinded assessors.

Results:

Mothers of infants in the GAME-based group reported significant improvements in their infants’ performance on functional priorities (p = 0.0001) and satisfaction with their infants’ performance (p = 0.0001), the extent in which services promoted enabling and partnership (p = 0.021), provided general information (p = 0.039), specific information (p = 0.0001), and an enriched home environment (p = 0.0001). Infants in both groups did not improve in motor or cognitive abilities.

Conclusions:

A family-centered early intervention program based on GAME principles improved mothers’ individualized outcomes and enriched infants with CZS’s environment. Future studies should elucidate long-term benefits of interventions for this population.

KEYWORDS: Family; Zika virus; goals; infants; intervention; occupational therapy; physical therapy; speech therapy

PMID: 31144558 DOI: 10.1080/01942638.2019.1600100

Keywords: Zika Virus; Zika Congenital Syndrome; Society; Psychiatry.

——

#Clinical and x-ray #oral #evaluation in patients with #congenital #Zika Virus (J Appl Oral Sci., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

J Appl Oral Sci. 2019 May 20;27:e20180276. doi: 10.1590/1678-7757-2018-0276.

Clinical and x-ray oral evaluation in patients with congenital Zika Virus.

Carvalho IF1, Alencar PNB1, Carvalho de Andrade MD1, Silva PGB1, Carvalho EDF1, Araújo LS1, Cavalcante MPM1, Sousa FB1.

Author information: 1 Centro Universitário Christus, Departamento de Odontologia, Fortaleza, Ceará, Brasil.

 

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to investigate possible malformations in the soft, bone and/or dental tissues in patients with congenital Zika Virus (ZIKV) by clinical and x-ray evaluation.

METHODOLOGY:

Thirty children born with ZIKV and 30 children born without ZIKV (control group) were included in the study. Patients were evaluated over 24 consecutive months according to the variables: sex, age, cleft palates, soft tissue lesions, alveolar ridge hyperplasia, short labial and lingual frenums, inadequate posture of the lingual and perioral muscles at rest, micrognathia, narrow palatine vaults, changes in the teeth shape and/or number, sequence eruption, spasms, seizures and eruption delay were evaluated. Chi-square test, Student’s t-test and nominal logistic regression were used (p<0.05).

RESULTS:

Among the 30 babies examined, the mean age of the first dental eruption was 10.8±3.8 with almost two-thirds of the children (n=18, 60%) experiencing eruptions of their first tooth after 9 months of age, nine children (30%) had inadequate lingual posture at rest, more than half of the children (n=18, 60%) had short labial or lingual frenums. ZIKV babies showed a high prevalence of clef palate (p<0.001), inadequate lingual posture at rest (p=0.004), micrognathia (p=0.002), changes in the shape and/or number of teeth (p=0.006), alteration in sequence of dental eruption (p<0.001) and muscles spasms (p=0.002). The delay eruption was associated with inadequate lingual posture at rest (p=0.047), micrognathia (p=0.002) and changes in the shape and/or number of teeth (p=0.021). The delayed eruption (p=0.006) and narrow palatine vaults (p=0.008) were independently associated with ZIKV. Moreover, female patients showed the most narrow palatine vaults (p=0.010).

CONCLUSIONS:

The children with ZIKV showed a greater tendency to have delayed eruption of the first deciduous tooth, inadequate lingual posture and short labial and lingual frenums.

PMID: 31116278 DOI: 10.1590/1678-7757-2018-0276

Keywords: Zika Virus; Zika Congenital Syndrome; Brazil.

——