#Clinical #analysis of #pregnant women with 2019 novel #coronavirus #pneumonia (J Med Virol., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Medical Virology, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Clinical analysis of pregnant women with 2019 novel coronavirus pneumonia

Siyu Chen,  E Liao,  Yong Shao

First published: 28 March 2020 | DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.25789

Funded by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No: 81471473); Chongqing Health Planning Commission project for training talented medical professionals (No. 2015XMSB0001298 and No. 2019ZDXM055).

This article has been accepted for publication and undergone full peer review but has not been through the copyediting, typesetting, pagination and proofreading process, which may lead to differences between this version and the Version of Record. Please cite this article as doi: 10.1002/jmv.25789

 

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the pregnant women infected with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) and provide help for clinical prevention and treatment.

Methods

All 5 cases of pregnant women confirmed COVID‐19 were collected among patients who admitted in Maternal and Child Hospital of Hubei Province between January 20 and February 10, 2020.

Results

All patients, aging from 25 to 31 years old, had the gestational week from 38th weeks to 41st weeks. All pregnant women did not have an antepartum fever but developed a low‐grade fever (37.5‐38.5℃) within 24 hours after delivery. All patients had normal liver and renal function, two patients had elevated plasma levels of the myocardial enzyme. Unusual chest imaging manifestations, featured with ground‐grass opacity, were frequently observed in bilateral (3 cases) or unilateral lobe (2 cases) by computed tomography (CT) scan. All labors smoothly processed, the Apgar scores were 10 one and five minutes after delivery, no complications were observed in the newborn.

Interpretation

Pregnancy and perinatal outcomes of patients with COVID‐19 should receive more attention. It is probable that pregnant women diagnosed with COVID‐19 have no fever before delivery. Their primary initial manifestations were merely low‐grade postpartum fever or mild respiratory symptoms. Therefore, the protective measures are necessary on admission; the instant CT scan and real‐time reverse‐transcriptase polymerase‐chain‐reaction (RT‐PCR) assay should be helpful in early diagnosis and avoid cross‐infection on the occasion that patients have fever and other respiratory signs.

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Pregnancy.

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#Maternal health care #management during the #outbreak of #coronavirus disease 2019 (#COVID19) (J Med Virol., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Medical Virology, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Maternal health care management during the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19)

Yu Chen MD,  Zhe Li MD,  Yuan‐Yuan Zhang MD,  Wei‐Hua Zhao MD, PhD,  Zhi‐Ying Yu MD

First published: 26 March 2020 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.25787

Funding information: Shenzhen Health Commission, SZSM201812041; Clinical Research Funding from Shenzhen Second People’s Hospital/the First Affiliated Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Science Center (No. 4001023); Shenzhen Science and Technology Innovation Committee, JCYJ20170817172241688; Shenzhen Science and Technology Innovation Committee, JCYJ20180228163529609

Editor: Yu Chen

This article has been accepted for publication and undergone full peer review but has not been through the copyediting, typesetting, pagination and proofreading process, which may lead to differences between this version and the Version of Record. Please cite this article as doi: 10.1002/jmv.25787

 

Abstract

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) is a novel type of highly contagious pneumonia caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS‐CoV‐2). Despite the strong efforts taken to control the epidemic, hundreds of thousands of people were infected worldwide by Mar. 11th, and was characterized as a pandemic by World Health Organization. Pregnant women are more susceptible to the virus due to immune and anatomic alteration, though hospital visits may increase the chance of infection, the lack of medical care during pregnancy may do more harm. Hence, a well‐managed system that allows pregnant women to access maternal health care with minimum exposure risk is desired during the outbreak. Here, we present the managing processes of three pregnant women that had a fever during hospitalization at gynecology or obstetrics department, then further summarize and demonstrate our maternal health care management strategies including antenatal care planning, patient triage based on risk level, admission control, and measures counteracting emergencies and newly discovered high risk cases at in‐patient department. In the meantime, we will explain the alterations we have done throughout different stages of the epidemic, and also review relative articles in both Chinese and English to compare our strategies with those of other areas. Although tens of COVID‐19 cases were confirmed in our hospital, no nosocomial infection has occurred and none of the pregnant woman registered in our hospital was reported to be infected.

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Pregnancy.

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#Neonatal Early-Onset #Infection With #SARS-CoV-2 in 33 Neonates Born to Mothers With #COVID19 in #Wuhan, #China (JAMA Pediatrics, summary)

[Source: JAMA Pediatrics, full page: (LINK). Summary, edited.]

Neonatal Early-Onset Infection With SARS-CoV-2 in 33 Neonates Born to Mothers With COVID-19 in Wuhan, China

Lingkong Zeng, MD1; Shiwen Xia, MD2; Wenhao Yuan, MD1; et al. Kai Yan, MD3; Feifan Xiao, MS3; Jianbo Shao, MD4; Wenhao Zhou, MD3

Author Affiliations: 1 Department of Neonatology, Institute of Maternal and Child Health, Wuhan Children’s Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China; 2 Department of Neonatology, Maternal and Child Health Hospital of Hubei Province, Wuhan, China; 3 National Children’s Medical Center, Children’s Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China; 4 Institute of Maternal and Child Health, Wuhan Children’s Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China

JAMA Pediatr. Published online March 26, 2020. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2020.0878

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The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread rapidly across the world. With the sharp increase in the number of infections, the number of pregnant women and children with COVID-19 is also on the rise. However, only 19 neonates born to affected mothers have been investigated, and to our knowledge, no information on early-onset infection in newborns has been published in previous studies.1,2

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Accepted for Publication: March 10, 2020.

Corresponding Author: Wenhao Zhou, MD, National Children’s Medical Center, Children’s Hospital of Fudan University, 399 Wanyuan Rd, Shanghai 201102, China (zhouwenhao@fudan.edu.cn).

Published Online: March 26, 2020. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2020.0878

Author Contributions: Dr Zeng had full access to all of the data in the study and takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis.

Concept and design: Zeng, Shao, Zhou.

Acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data: All authors.

Drafting of the manuscript: All authors.

Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: Xia, Yuan, Xiao, Shao, Zhou.

Statistical analysis: Zeng, Yuan, Yan, Xiao.

Administrative, technical, or material support: Zeng, Xia, Yan, Shao, Zhou.

Supervision: Shao, Zhou.

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported.

Additional Contributions: We thank Shoo K. Lee, MD, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Department of Public Health, University of Toronto, for editing assistance. He was compensated for his contribution. We thank the patients’ families for granting permission to publish this information.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Pregnancy; Pediatrics.

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#Antibodies in #Infants Born to #Mothers With #COVID19 #Pneumonia (JAMA, summary)

[Source: JAMA, full page: (LINK). Summary, edited.]

Antibodies in Infants Born to Mothers With COVID-19 Pneumonia

Hui Zeng, MD1; Chen Xu, BS1; Junli Fan, MD1; et al. Yueting Tang, PhD1; Qiaoling Deng, MD1; Wei Zhang, MD, PhD2; Xinghua Long, MD, PhD1

Author Affiliations: 1 Department of Laboratory Medicine, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China; 2 Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, China

JAMA. Published online March 26, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.4861

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Tests for IgG and IgM antibodies for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) became available in February 2020. On March 4, 2020, the seventh edition of the New Coronavirus Pneumonia Prevention and Control Protocol for the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was released by the National Health Commission of the People’s Republic of China and added serological diagnostic criteria.1 A previous study of 9 pregnant women and their infants found no maternal-infant transmission of SARS-CoV-2 based on reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).2 We applied these new criteria to 6 pregnant women with confirmed COVID-19 and their infants because serologic criteria would allow more detailed investigation of infection in newborns.

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Section Editor: Jody W. Zylke, MD, Deputy Editor.

Corresponding Authors: Xinghua Long, MD, PhD (zhoulongxinghua@qq.com) and Wei Zhang, MD, PhD (zw6676@163.com), Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 169 Donghu Rd, Wuhan, China.

Published Online: March 26, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.4861

Author Contributions: Drs Long and Zhang had full access to all the data in the study and take responsibility for the integrity of the data and accuracy of the data analysis. Dr Zeng and Ms Xu contributed equally to the study.

Concept and design: Zeng, Xu, Long.

Acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data: Fan, Tang, Deng, Zhang.

Drafting of the manuscript: Zeng, Xu, Long.

Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: Fang, Tang, Deng, Zhang.

Statistical analysis: Zeng, Xu, Fan, Tang, Deng.

Obtained funding: Long.

Supervision: Zhang.

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported.

Funding/Support: This study was supported by grants 81272372 from the National Natural Science Foundation of China and znpy2016033 from Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University Science, Technology, and Innovation Seed Fund.

Role of the Funder/Sponsor: The sponsors had no role in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript; and decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Pregnancy.

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Possible #Vertical #Transmission of #SARS-CoV-2 From an Infected #Mother to Her #Newborn (JAMA, summary)

[Source: JAMA, full page: (LINK). Summary, edited.]

Possible Vertical Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 From an Infected Mother to Her Newborn
Lan Dong, MD1; Jinhua Tian, MD1; Songming He, MD1; et al. Chuchao Zhu, MD2; Jian Wang, MD3; Chen Liu, MD3; Jing Yang, MD1

Author Affiliations: 1 Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, China; 2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, General Hospital of Central Command Theater in PLA, Wuhan, Hubei, China; 3 Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital to Army Medical University, Chongqing, China

JAMA. Published online March 26, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.4621

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Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is highly infectious, with multiple possible routes of transmission.1-3 Controversy exists regarding whether SARS-CoV-2 can be transmitted in utero from an infected mother to her infant before birth. A series of 9 pregnant women found no mother-child transmission.4 We report a newborn with elevated IgM antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 born to a mother with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

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Section Editor: Jody W. Zylke, MD, Deputy Editor.

Corresponding Authors: Jing Yang, MD, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, 283 Jiefang Rd, Wuhan, Hubei 430060, China (13507182023@163.com); Chen Liu, MD, Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital to Army Medical University, 30 Gao Tan Yan St, Chongqing 400038, China (liuchen@aifmri.com).

Published Online: March 26, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.4621

Author Contributions: Drs Liu and Yang had full access to all of the data in the study and take responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis. Drs Dong and Tian contributed equally to the study. Drs Liu and Yang contributed equally as senior authors.

Concept and design: Wang, Liu, Yang.

Acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data: Dong, Tian, He, Zhu.

Drafting of the manuscript: Dong, Tian, He, Zhu, Liu.

Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: Zhu, Wang, Liu, Yang.

Statistical analysis: Dong, Tian, He, Liu.

Obtained funding: Zhu, Wang, Liu, Yang.

Supervision: Zhu, Yang.

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported.

Funding/Support: This work was supported by the Chongqing Key technology and application demonstration of medical imaging depth intelligent diagnostic platform (cstc2018jszx-cyztzxX0017), the National Key Research and Development Project (2018YFC1002804, 2016YFC1000600), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 81771618 and No. 81801524).

Role of the Funder/Sponsor: The funders had no role in the design and conduct of the study; collection, management, analysis, and interpretation of the data; preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript; and decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

Additional Contributions: We thank the family members who were involved in this study and we thank the patient for granting permission to publish this information.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Pregnancy.

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#Clinical #features and #obstetric and #neonatal #outcomes of #pregnant patients with #COVID19 in #Wuhan, #China: a retrospective, single-centre, descriptive study (Lancet Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Clinical features and obstetric and neonatal outcomes of pregnant patients with COVID-19 in Wuhan, China: a retrospective, single-centre, descriptive study

Nan Yu, PhD †, Wei Li, PhD †, Qingling Kang, PhD, Zhi Xiong, PhD, Shaoshuai Wang, PhD, Xingguang Lin, PhD, Yanyan Liu, PhD, Juan Xiao, PhD, Haiyi Liu, PhD, Prof Dongrui Deng, PhD, Prof Suhua Chen, PhD, Prof Wanjiang Zeng, PhD, Prof Ling Feng, PhD, Jianli Wu, PhD

Published: March 24, 2020 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(20)30176-6

 

Summary

Background

In December, 2019, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) emerged in Wuhan, China. The number of affected pregnant women is increasing, but scarce information is available about the clinical features of COVID-19 in pregnancy. This study aimed to clarify the clinical features and obstetric and neonatal outcomes of pregnant patients with COVID-19.

Methods

In this retrospective, single-centre study, we included all pregnant women with COVID-19 who were admitted to Tongji Hospital in Wuhan, China. Clinical features, treatments, and maternal and fetal outcomes were assessed.

Findings

Seven patients, admitted to Tongji Hospital from Jan 1, to Feb 8, 2020, were included in our study. The mean age of the patients was 32 years (range 29–34 years) and the mean gestational age was 39 weeks plus 1 day (range 37 weeks to 41 weeks plus 2 days). Clinical manifestations were fever (six [86%] patients), cough (one [14%] patient), shortness of breath (one [14%] patient), and diarrhoea (one [14%] patient). All the patients had caesarean section within 3 days of clinical presentation with an average gestational age of 39 weeks plus 2 days. The final date of follow-up was Feb 12, 2020. The outcomes of the pregnant women and neonates were good. Three neonates were tested for SARS-CoV-2 and one neonate was infected with SARS-CoV-2 36 h after birth.

Interpretation

The maternal, fetal, and neonatal outcomes of patients who were infected in late pregnancy appeared very good, and these outcomes were achieved with intensive, active management that might be the best practice in the absence of more robust data. The clinical characteristics of these patients with COVID-19 during pregnancy were similar to those of non-pregnant adults with COVID-19 that have been reported in the literature.

Funding

National Natural Science Foundation of China, Hubei Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Pregnancy; Pediatrics.

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Under the #epidemic #situation of #COVID19, should special #attention to #pregnant women be given? (J Med Virol., summary)

[Source: Journal of Medical Virology, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Under the epidemic situation of COVID‐19, should special attention to pregnant women be given?

Jian Jiao

First published: 17 March 2020 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.25771

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The sudden outbreak and spread of COVID‐19 in this spring led to a serious challenge to the global public health system. So far, the number of cases in the mainland of China has exceeded 80 000, more than 3000 people died of this disease. The latest data showed that in addition to China’s neighboring countries like Japan, South Korea, Thailand and India, severe outbreaks have also occurred in Italy and many other countries around the world. As dated on 12th March, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared that the confirmed cases reported outside China rise to more than 30 000. WHO had announced that “this is not a drill, it’s a global pandemic.”

(…)

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Pregnancy.

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