#Disparities in #Age-Specific #Morbidity and #Mortality from #SARS-CoV-2 in #China and the Republic of #Korea (Clin Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: Clinical Infectious Diseases, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Disparities in Age-Specific Morbidity and Mortality from SARS-CoV-2 in China and the Republic of Korea

Joseph P Dudley, Nam Taek Lee

Clinical Infectious Diseases, ciaa354, https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciaa354

Published: 31 March 2020

 

Abstract

We analyzed age- and sex-specific morbidity and mortality data from SARS-COV-2 pandemic in China and Republic of Korea (ROK). Data from China exhibit a Gaussian distribution with peak morbidity in the 50-59 years cohort, while the ROK data have a bimodal distribution with highest morbidity in the 20-29 years cohort.

Issue Section: Brief Report

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Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; China; S. Korea.

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#Transmission #Potential and #Severity of #COVID19 in South #Korea (Int J Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Int J Infect Dis 2020 Mar 17 [Online ahead of print]

Transmission Potential and Severity of COVID-19 in South Korea

Eunha Shim 1, Amna Tariq 2, Wongyeong Choi 3, Yiseul Lee 4, Gerardo Chowell 5

Affiliations: 1 Department of Mathematics, Soongsil University, 369 Sangdoro, Dongjak-Gu, Seoul, 06978 Republic of Korea. Electronic address: alicia@ssu.ac.kr. 2 Department of Population Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: atariq1@student.gsu.edu. 3 Department of Mathematics, Soongsil University, 369 Sangdoro, Dongjak-Gu, Seoul, 06978 Republic of Korea. Electronic address: chok10004@soongsil.ac.kr. 4 Department of Population Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: ylee97@student.gsu.edu. 5 Department of Population Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: gchowell@gsu.edu.

PMID: 32198088 DOI: 10.1016/j.ijid.2020.03.031

 

Abstract

Objectives:

Since the first case of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) identified on Jan 20, 2020 in South Korea, the number of cases rapidly increased, resulting in 6,284 cases including 42 deaths as of March 6, 2020. To examine the growth rate of the outbreak, we aimed to present the first study to report the reproduction number of COVID-19 in South Korea.

Methods:

The daily confirmed cases of COVID-19 in South Korea were extracted from publicly available sources. By using the empirical reporting delay distribution and simulating the generalized growth model, we estimated the effective reproduction number based on the discretized probability distribution of the generation interval.

Results:

We identified four major clusters and estimated the reproduction number at 1.5 (95% CI: 1.4-1.6). In addition, the intrinsic growth rate was estimated at 0.6 (95% CI: 0.6, 0.7) and the scaling of growth parameter was estimated at 0.8 (95% CI: 0.7, 0.8), indicating sub-exponential growth dynamics of COVID-19. The crude case fatality rate is higher among males (1.1%) compared to females (0.4%) and increases with older age.

Conclusions:

Our results indicate early sustained transmission of COVID-19 in South Korea and support the implementation of social distancing measures to rapidly control the outbreak.

Keywords: COVID-19; Korea; coronavirus; reproduction number.

Copyright © 2020. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Keywords: COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2; S. Korea.

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Identification of #Coronavirus Isolated From a Patient in #Korea With #COVID19 (Osong Public Health Res Perspect., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Osong Public Health Res Perspect, 11 (1), 3-7 Feb 2020

Identification of Coronavirus Isolated From a Patient in Korea With COVID-19

Jeong-Min Kim 1, Yoon-Seok Chung 1, Hye Jun Jo 1, Nam-Joo Lee 1, Mi Seon Kim 1, Sang Hee Woo 1, Sehee Park 1, Jee Woong Kim 2, Heui Man Kim 1, Myung-Guk Han 1

Affiliations: 1 Division of Viral Diseases, Center for Laboratory Control of Infectious Diseases, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Cheongju, Korea. 2 Division of Biosafety Evaluation and Control, National Institute of Health, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Cheongju, Korea.

PMID: 32149036 PMCID: PMC7045880 DOI: 10.24171/j.phrp.2020.11.1.02

 

Abstract

Objectives:

Following reports of patients with unexplained pneumonia at the end of December 2019 in Wuhan, China, the causative agent was identified as coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), and the 2019 novel coronavirus disease was named COVID-19 by the World Health Organization. Putative patients with COVID-19 have been identified in South Korea, and attempts have been made to isolate the pathogen from these patients.

Methods:

Upper and lower respiratory tract secretion samples from putative patients with COVID-19 were inoculated onto cells to isolate the virus. Full genome sequencing and electron microscopy were used to identify the virus.

Results:

The virus replicated in Vero cells and cytopathic effects were observed. Full genome sequencing showed that the virus genome exhibited sequence homology of more than 99.9% with SARS-CoV-2 which was isolated from patients from other countries, for instance China. Sequence homology of SARS-CoV-2 with SARS-CoV, and MERS-CoV was 77.5% and 50%, respectively. Coronavirus-specific morphology was observed by electron microscopy in virus-infected Vero cells.

Conclusion:

SARS-CoV-2 was isolated from putative patients with unexplained pneumonia and intermittent coughing and fever. The isolated virus was named BetaCoV/Korea/KCDC03/2020.

Keywords: COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2; coronavirus; isolation; pneumonia.

Copyright ©2020, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Conflict of interest statement: Conflicts of Interest The authors have no conflicts of interest to declare.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; S. Korea.

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Case of the Index Patient Who Caused Tertiary Transmission of #Coronavirus Disease 2019 in #Korea: the Application of #Lopinavir / Ritonavir for the #Treatment of #COVID19 Pneumonia Monitored by Quantitative RT-PCR (J Korean Med Sci., summary)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

J Korean Med Sci. 2020 Feb 24; 35(7): e88. Published online 2020 Feb 20. doi: 10.3346/jkms.2020.35.e88

PMCID: PMC7036343 PMID: 32080992

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Letter to the Editor: Case of the Index Patient Who Caused Tertiary Transmission of Coronavirus Disease 2019 in Korea: the Application of Lopinavir/Ritonavir for the Treatment of COVID-19 Pneumonia Monitored by Quantitative RT-PCR

Jin Yong Kim

See the article “Case of the Index Patient Who Caused Tertiary Transmission of Coronavirus Disease 2019 in Korea: the Application of Lopinavir/Ritonavir for the Treatment of COVID-19 Pneumonia Monitored by Quantitative RT-PCR” , e79.

I am grateful that Dr. Lim and his colleagues reported a case of COVID-19 that caused tertiary transmission in Korea and added information about the novel infectious disease.1 In this report, the authors emphasized the decrease in viral titer due to the effects of antiviral administration. However, I would like to discuss what to look out for when interpreting the causal relationship between laboratory results and therapeutic effects.

(…)

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Disclosure: The author has no potential conflicts of interest to disclose.

Keywords: COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2; Antivirals; Lopinavir; Ritonavir; S. Korea.

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Case of the #Index #Patient Who Caused Tertiary #Transmission of #Coronavirus Disease 2019 in #Korea: the Application of #Lopinavir/Ritonavir for the #Treatment of #COVID19 Pneumonia Monitored by Quantitative RT-PCR (J Korean Med Sci., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

J Korean Med Sci. 2020 Feb 17; 35(6): e79. Published online 2020 Feb 14. doi: 10.3346/jkms.2020.35.e79

PMCID: PMC7025910 PMID: 32056407

Case of the Index Patient Who Caused Tertiary Transmission of Coronavirus Disease 2019 in Korea: the Application of Lopinavir/Ritonavir for the Treatment of COVID-19 Pneumonia Monitored by Quantitative RT-PCR

Jaegyun Lim,1 Seunghyun Jeon,2 Hyun-Young Shin,3 Moon Jung Kim,1 Yu Min Seong,4 Wang Jun Lee,5 Kang-Won Choe,6 Yu Min Kang,6 Baeckseung Lee, 7 and Sang-Joon Park 8

 

Abstract

Since mid-December of 2019, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been spreading from Wuhan, China. The confirmed COVID-19 patients in South Korea are those who came from or visited China. As secondary transmissions have occurred and the speed of transmission is accelerating, there are rising concerns about community infections. The 54-year old male is the third patient diagnosed with COVID-19 in Korea. He is a worker for a clothing business and had mild respiratory symptoms and intermittent fever in the beginning of hospitalization, and pneumonia symptoms on chest computerized tomography scan on day 6 of admission. This patient caused one case of secondary transmission and three cases of tertiary transmission. Hereby, we report the clinical findings of the index patient who was the first to cause tertiary transmission outside China. Interestingly, after lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra, AbbVie) was administered, β-coronavirus viral loads significantly decreased and no or little coronavirus titers were observed.

Keywords: Coronavirus, COVID-19, Pneumonia, Tertiary Infection, Viral Load, Real-Time Reverse-Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction

Keywords: COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2; Antivirals; Lopinavir; Ritonavir; S. Korea.

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#Epidemiologic Characteristics of Early Cases With 2019 Novel #Coronavirus (#2019nCoV) Disease in Republic of #Korea (Epidemiol Infect., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Epidemiol Health, e2020007 2020 Feb 9 [Online ahead of print]

Epidemiologic Characteristics of Early Cases With 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Disease in Republic of Korea

Moran Ki 1, Task Force For -nCoV 2

Affiliations: 1 Department of Cancer Control and Population Health, Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Korea. 2 The Korean Society for Preventive Medicine & Korean Society of Epidemiology.

PMID: 32035431 DOI: 10.4178/epih.e2020007

 

Abstract

Since the first case of 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) in South Korea was confirmed on January 20, 2020, there have been 24 confirmed cases of 2019-nCoV. The majority of these cases (58.3%; n=14) were male, with a median age of 42 years (range, 21-62 years). Of the confirmed cases, 15 were index cases (63%), six were first-generation patients (24%), and three were second-generation patients (12.5%). All the first- and second-generation patients were family members or close acquaintances of index cases. All the index cases entered the South Korea from January 19 to 24, 2020. The average incubation period was 3.6 days (median, 4 days) and the reproduction number (R0) was calculated as 0.5. Two of the confirmed cases were asymptomatic. As of February 8, 22 patients with 2019-nCoV are hospitalized in South Korea, and 2 have been discharged from the hospital. The epidemiological indicators will be revised as new information becomes available in the future. Sharing epidemiological information among researchers around the world is essential for efficient preparations and responses to new infectious diseases.

Keywords: Epidemiology; Isolation; Outbreak; Quarantine; Republic of Korea; novel Coronavirus.

Keywords: 2019-nCoV; S. Korea.

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The First Case of 2019 Novel #Coronavirus #Pneumonia Imported Into #Korea From Wuhan, #China: Implication for #IPC Measures (J Korean Med Sci., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

J Korean Med Sci, 35 (5), e61 2020 Feb 10

The First Case of 2019 Novel Coronavirus Pneumonia Imported Into Korea From Wuhan, China: Implication for Infection Prevention and Control Measures

Jin Yong Kim # 1 2 3, Pyoeng Gyun Choe # 4, Yoonju Oh 1, Kyung Joong Oh 5, Jinsil Kim 2, So Jeong Park 2, Ji Hye Park 2, Hye Kyoung Na 3, Myoung Don Oh 6

Affiliations: 1 Department of Internal Medicine, Incheon Medical Center, Incheon, Korea. 2 Infection Control Office, Incheon Medical Center, Incheon, Korea. 3 Designated Isolation Unit, Incheon Medical Center, Incheon, Korea. 4 Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. 5 Department of Radiology, Incheon Medical Center, Incheon, Korea. 6 Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. mdohmd@snu.ac.kr.

#Contributed equally.

PMID: 32030925  DOI: 10.3346/jkms.2020.35.e61

 

Abstract

In December 2019, a viral pneumonia outbreak caused by a novel betacoronavirus, the 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV), began in Wuhan, China. We report the epidemiological and clinical features of the first patient with 2019-nCoV pneumonia imported into Korea from Wuhan. This report suggests that in the early phase of 2019-nCoV pneumonia, chest radiography would miss patients with pneumonia and highlights taking travel history is of paramount importance for early detection and isolation of 2019-nCoV cases.

Keywords: 2019-nCoV; Coronavirus; Outbreak; Pneumonia; Radiography.

© 2020 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

Keywords: 2019-nCoV; China; S. Korea.

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