Use of #mosquito #repellents to protect against #Zika virus infection among #pregnant women in #Brazil (Public Health, abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Public Health. 2019 May 17;171:89-96. doi: 10.1016/j.puhe.2019.04.002. [Epub ahead of print]

Use of mosquito repellents to protect against Zika virus infection among pregnant women in Brazil.

Dantas Melo VA1, Santos Silva JR2, La Corte R3.

Author information: 1 Graduate Program in Parasitic Biology, Federal University of Sergipe, Avenue Marechal Rondon S/n. Jardim Rosa Elze, University City Professor José Aloísio de Campos São Cristovão, Brazil. 2 Graduate Program in Parasitic Biology, Federal University of Sergipe, Avenue Marechal Rondon S/n. Jardim Rosa Elze, University City Professor José Aloísio de Campos São Cristovão, Brazil; Department of Statistics and Actuarial Sciences, Federal University of Sergipe, Avenue Marechal Rondon S/n. Jardim Rosa Elze, University City Professor José Aloísio de Campos São Cristovão, Brazil. 3 Graduate Program in Parasitic Biology, Federal University of Sergipe, Avenue Marechal Rondon S/n. Jardim Rosa Elze, University City Professor José Aloísio de Campos São Cristovão, Brazil; Department of Morphology, Federal University of Sergipe, Avenue Marechal Rondon S/n. Jardim Rosa Elze, University City Professor José Aloísio de Campos São Cristovão, Brazil. Electronic address: rlacorte@ufs.br.

 

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate the use of repellents among pregnant women as a protective measure against infection with the Zika virus.

STUDY DESIGN:

Pregnant women (n = 177) were interviewed between November 2016 and February 2017 at Basic Health Units in the city of Propriá, state of Sergipe, Brazil. Two units were located in rural areas and eight in urban regions.

METHODS:

Data were analysed using descriptive statistical methods, the Chi-squared test or Fisher’s exact test and odds ratios. The independent variables were grouped by analysis of the main components, and adherence to the use of the repellent was analysed by the logistic regression method.

RESULTS:

A total of 100 women reported using repellents at the time of the interview (56%). The use of repellents was greater among women with higher levels of education (83%) than those with only high school (68%) or elementary school (36%) education. Women assisted by the income transfer programme (Bolsa Família) presented a 2.27 times greater chance of not using repellents compared with pregnant women who were not receiving benefits of the programme. Regarding the logistic regression model, we observed that low economic and social conditions of pregnant women, as well as their lack of advice, had a negative effect on the use of repellents.

CONCLUSIONS:

Repellents were generally used as a preventive measure in pregnant women with higher levels of schooling and fewer children. The relatively high cost of repellents was the main reason for non-use.

Copyright © 2019. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

KEYWORDS: Aedes aegypti; Pregnant women; Repellents; Vector control; Zika virus

PMID: 31112836 DOI: 10.1016/j.puhe.2019.04.002

Keywords: Zika Virus; Pregnancy; Society; Poverty; Mosquitoes repellents.

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Changing #Trends in #Opioid #Overdose #Deaths and #Prescription Opioid Receipt Among #Veterans (Am J Prev Med., abstract)

[Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Changing Trends in Opioid Overdose Deaths and Prescription Opioid Receipt Among Veterans

Lewei (Allison) Lin, MD, MS1,2, Talya Peltzman, MPH3, John F. McCarthy, PhD, MPH1,2,3, Elizabeth M. Oliva, PhD4,5, Jodie A. Trafton, PhD4,5, Amy S.B. Bohnert, PhD, MHS1,2

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2019.01.016

Published online: May 22, 2019

 

Abstract

Introduction

To inform overdose prevention, this study assessed both recent trends in opioid overdose mortality across opioid categories and receipt of prescription opioid analgesics among Veterans who died from overdose in the Veterans Health Administration.

Methods

Using Veterans Health Administration records linked to National Death Index data, annual cohorts (2010–2016) of Veterans who received Veterans Health Administration care were obtained and were examined by opioid overdose categories (natural/semisynthetic opioids, heroin, methadone, and other synthetic opioids) on (1) overdose rates and changes in rates adjusted for age, sex, and race/ethnicity; and (2) Veterans Health Administration prescription opioid receipt. Analyses were conducted in 2018.

Results

The overall rate of opioid overdose among Veterans increased from 14.47 per 100,000 person-years in 2010 to 21.08 per 100,000 person-years in 2016 (adjusted rate ratio=1.65, 95% CI=1.51, 1.81). There was a decline in methadone overdose (adjusted rate ratio=0.66, 95% CI=0.51, 0.84) and no significant change in natural/semisynthetic opioid overdose (adjusted rate ratio=1.08, 95% CI=0.94, 1.24). However, the synthetic opioid overdose rate (adjusted rate ratio=5.46, 95% CI=4.41, 6.75) and heroin overdose rate (adjusted rate ratio=4.91, 95% CI=3.92, 6.15) increased substantially. Among all opioid overdose decedents, prescription opioid receipt within 3 months before death declined from 54% in 2010 to 26% in 2016.

Conclusions

Opioid overdose rates among Veterans Health Administration Veterans increased because of increases in heroin and synthetic opioid overdose rates. Prescriptions of opioids declined among patients who died from all categories of opioid overdose; by 2016, only a minority received an opioid analgesic from Veterans Health Administration within 3 months of overdose. Future prevention efforts should extend beyond patients actively receiving opioid prescriptions.

Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Keywords: Opioids; Heroin; Drugs overdose; USA; Society.

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#Water and #Sanitation #Deficits Take a Toll in Armed #Conflict Regions (JAMA, summary)

[Source: Journal of American Medical Association, full page: (LINK). Summary, edited.]

Global Health / May 21, 2019

Water and Sanitation Deficits Take a Toll in Armed Conflict Regions

M.J. Friedrich

JAMA. 2019;321(19):1861. doi:10.1001/jama.2019.6186

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Diarrheal diseases resulting from scarce clean water and sanitation in countries with protracted armed conflicts take more children’s lives than the violence itself, according to a recent United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) report.

(…)

Keywords: Society; Poverty; Public Health; Wars.

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#Refugee and #migrant #health in the #European Region (Lancet, summary)

[Source: The Lancet, full page: (LINK). Summary, edited.]

Refugee and migrant health in the European Region

Ryoko Takahashi, Krista Kruja, Soorej Jose Puthoopparambil, Santino Severoni

Published: May 20, 2019 / DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(19)30282-X

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WHO is the respected authority in leading the production and use of core evidence for public health decision making.1 The Health Evidence Network (HEN) is an information service for public health decision makers in the WHO European Region and supports them to use the best available evidence.

(…)

We declare no competing interests.

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Article Info

Published: May 20, 2019

Identification: DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(19)30282-X

Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords: Migrants; Society; Politics; European Region; Public Health.

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#Privatisation of #immigration #detention facilities (Lancet, summary)

[Source: The Lancet, full page: (LINK). Summary, edited.]

Privatisation of immigration detention facilities

Altaf Saadi, Lello Tesema

Published: May 20, 2019 / DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(19)30351-4

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In December, 2018, two Guatemalan children, a 7-year-old girl and an 8-year-old boy, died while detained in immigration custody in the USA. Their tragic deaths should raise alarm about the dangerously substandard medical and mental health care at US immigration detention facilities.

(…)

We declare no competing interests.

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Article Info

Published: May 20, 2019

Identification: DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(19)30351-4

Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords: USA; Society; Politics; Migrants; Racism; Public Health.

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#Immigration in #Italy: the #medical #community’s role in #human #rights (Lancet, summary)

[Source: The Lancet, full page: (LINK). Summary, edited.]

Immigration in Italy: the medical community’s role in human rights

Raffaella Casolino

Published: May 20, 2019 / DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(19)30216-8

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Italy has been witnessing a rapid escalation towards racism and xenophobia since the new government came into power in June, 2018. On Nov 27, 2018, the lower house of the Italian Parliament approved the Decree-Law on Immigration and Security, which includes measures that would abolish humanitarian protection status for migrants, block asylum seekers from accessing reception centres focusing on social inclusion, and extend the duration of detention in return centres and hotspots. These measures fundamentally undermine international human rights principles. The day after approval, the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of the Interior declared that Italy would not sign the UN Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration or take part in an intergovernmental conference in Marrakech, Morocco, on Dec 10, 2018.

(…)

I declare no competing interests.

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Reference

UN Human Rights, Office of the high commissioner. Legal changes and climate of hatred threaten migrants’ rights in Italy, say UN experts. URL: https://www.ohchr.org/en/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=23908&LangID=E | Date: Nov 21, 2018 | Date accessed: November 28, 2018

 

Article Info

Published: May 20, 2019

Identification: DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(19)30216-8

Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords: Public Health; Society; Politics; Italy; Migrants; Racism.

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Participatory #Monitoring and #Evaluation of #Ebola #Response Activities in Lofa County, #Liberia: Some Lessons Learned (Int Q Community Health Educ., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Int Q Community Health Educ. 2019 May 12:272684X19846742. doi: 10.1177/0272684X19846742. [Epub ahead of print]

Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation of Ebola Response Activities in Lofa County, Liberia: Some Lessons Learned.

Hassaballa I1, Fawcett S2, Sepers C2, Reed FD2, Schultz J2, Munodawafa D3, Phori PM3, Chiriseri E4, Kouadio K3.

Author information: 1 Department of Psychology, The American University in Cairo, Egypt. 2 World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Community Health and Development, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA. 3 WHO Regional Office for Africa, Brazzaville, Republic of Congo. 4 Department of Community Medicine, Midlands State University, Gweru, Zimbabwe.

 

Abstract

To address the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children’s Fund led a multilevel and multisectoral intervention known as the Ebola response effort. Although surveillance systems were able to detect reduction in Ebola incidence, there was little understanding of the implemented activities within affected areas. To address this gap, this empirical case study examined (a) implementation of Ebola response activities and associated bending the curve of incidence of Ebola virus disease and (b) candidate factors associated with fuller implementation of the Ebola response effort. A mix of qualitative and quantitative methods were used to address these questions. A participatory monitoring and evaluation system was used to capture, code, characterize, and communicate nearly a hundred Ebola response activities implemented in Lofa County, a highly affected area in Liberia. The Ebola response effort was enabled by community engagement and collaboration across different sectors. Results showed fuller implementation corresponded with a marked reduction in Ebola virus disease. This report concludes with a discussion of how monitoring and evaluation can strengthen implementation of activities needed to address disease outbreaks.

KEYWORDS: Ebola; Liberia; Lofa County; participatory evaluation

PMID: 31081453 DOI: 10.1177/0272684X19846742

Keywords: Ebola; Liberia; Society.

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