#GENOMIC CHARACTERISATION AND #PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF #SARS‐COV‐2 IN #ITALY (J Med Virol., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Medical Virology, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

GENOMIC CHARACTERISATION AND PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF SARS‐COV‐2 IN ITALY

Gianguglielmo Zehender,  Alessia Lai,  Annalisa Bergna,  Luca Meroni,  Agostino Riva, Claudia Balotta,  Maciej Tarkowski,  Arianna Gabrieli,  Dario Bernacchia,  Stefano Rusconi

First published: 29 March 2020 | DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.25794

This article has been accepted for publication and undergone full peer review but has not been through the copyediting, typesetting, pagination and proofreading process, which may lead to differences between this version and the Version of Record. Please cite this article as doi: 10.1002/jmv.25794

 

ABSTRACT

This report describes the isolation, molecular characterisation and phylogenetic analysis of the first three complete genomes of SARS‐CoV‐2 isolated from three patients involved in the first outbreak of COVID‐19 in Lombardy, Italy. Early molecular epidemiological tracing suggests that SARS‐CoV‐2 was present in Italy weeks before the first reported cases of infection.

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Italy.

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At the #Epicenter of the #Covid19 #Pandemic and #Humanitarian Crises in #Italy: Changing Perspectives on Preparation and Mitigation (N Eng J Med., abstract)

[Source: The New England Journal of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

At the Epicenter of the Covid-19 Pandemic and Humanitarian Crises in Italy: Changing Perspectives on Preparation and Mitigation

By Mirco Nacoti, MD, Andrea Ciocca, MEng, Angelo Giupponi, MD, Pietro Brambillasca, MD, Federico Lussana, MD, Michele Pisano, MD, Giuseppe Goisis, PhD, Daniele Bonacina, MD, Francesco Fazzi, MD, Richard Naspro, MD, et al.

March 21, 2020

 

Summary

In a pandemic, patient-centered care is inadequate and must be replaced by community-centered care. Solutions for Covid-19 are required for the entire population, not only for hospitals. The catastrophe unfolding in wealthy Lombardy could happen anywhere. Clinicians at a hospital at the epicenter call for a long-term plan for the next pandemic.
We work at the Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital in Bergamo, a brand-new state-of-the-art facility with 48 intensive-care beds. Despite being a relatively small city, this is the epicenter of the Italian epidemic, listing 4,305 cases at this moment — more than Milan or anywhere else in the country (Figure 1). Lombardy is one of the richest and most densely populated regions in Europe and is now the most severely affected one. The World Health Organization (WHO) reported 74,346 laboratory-confirmed cases in Europe on March 18 — 35,713 of them in Italy.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Italy; Society.

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A #doubt of multiple #introduction of #SARS‐CoV‐2 in #Italy: A preliminary overview (J Med Virol., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Medical Virology, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

A doubt of multiple introduction of SARS‐CoV‐2 in Italy: A preliminary overview

Marta Giovanetti,  Silvia Angeletti,  Domenico Benvenuto,  Massimo Ciccozzi

First published: 19 March 2020 | DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.25773

 

Abstract

The emergence of the novel betacoronavirus, recently renamed as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS‐CoV‐2) has raised serious concerns due to the virus’s rapid dissemination worldwide. Nevertheless, there is limited information about the genomic epidemiology of SARS‐CoV‐2 circulating in Italy from surveillance studies. The shortage of complete genomic sequences available impairs our understanding of the SARS‐CoV‐2 introduction and establishment in the country. To better understand its dynamics in Italy, we analyzed complete genomes of SARS‐CoV‐2 isolates, obtained directly from clinical samples. Our phylogenetic reconstructions suggest possible multiple introduction of SARS‐CoV‐2. Continued genomic surveillance strategies are needed to improve monitoring and understanding of the current SARS‐CoV‐2 epidemics, which might help to attenuate public health impact of infectious diseases.

 

Research Highlights

  • COVId‐19 epidemic spread in Italy.
  • Italian circulation started form mutiple introduction.
  • Genomic data availabilty can help in epidemiological dynamic understanding improvement.
  • Italian epidemic was probably caused by two independent introductions mediated by China and Germany.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Italy.

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Potential short-term #outcome of an #uncontrolled #COVID19 #epidemic in #Lombardy, #Italy, February to March 2020 (Euro Surveill., abstract)

[Source: Eurosurveillance, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Potential short-term outcome of an uncontrolled COVID-19 epidemic in Lombardy, Italy, February to March 2020

Giorgio Guzzetta1, Piero Poletti1, Marco Ajelli1, Filippo Trentini1, Valentina Marziano1, Danilo Cereda2, Marcello Tirani2,3, Giulio Diurno2, Annalisa Bodina2, Antonio Barone2, Lucia Crottogini2, Maria Gramegna2, Alessia Melegaro4,5, Stefano Merler1,5

Affiliations: 1 Bruno Kessler Foundation, Trento, Italy; 2 Lombardy Region, Directorate General for Health, UO Prevenzione, Milan, Italy; 3 Health Protection Agency of Pavia, Department of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, Pavia, Italy; 4 Bocconi University, Dondena Centre for Research on Social Dynamics and Public Policy, Milan, Italy; 5 These authors are joint senior authors and contributed equally to this work.

Correspondence:  Alessia Melegaro

Citation style for this article: Guzzetta Giorgio, Poletti Piero, Ajelli Marco, Trentini Filippo, Marziano Valentina, Cereda Danilo, Tirani Marcello, Diurno Giulio, Bodina Annalisa, Barone Antonio, Crottogini Lucia, Gramegna Maria, Melegaro Alessia, Merler Stefano. Potential short-term outcome of an uncontrolled COVID-19 epidemic in Lombardy, Italy, February to March 2020. Euro Surveill. 2020;25(12):pii=2000293. https://doi.org/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2020.25.12.2000293

Received: 12 Mar 2020;   Accepted: 25 Mar 2020

 

Abstract

Sustained coronavirus disease (COVID-19) transmission is ongoing in Italy, with 7,375 reported cases and 366 deaths by 8 March 2020. We provide a model-based evaluation of patient records from Lombardy, predicting the impact of an uncontrolled epidemic on the healthcare system. It has the potential to cause more than 250,039 (95% credible interval (CrI): 147,717–459,890) cases within 3 weeks, including 37,194 (95% CrI: 22,250–67,632) patients requiring intensive care. Aggressive containment strategies are required.

©  This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Intensive Care; Italy.

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#CFR and Characteristics of #Patients #Dying in Relation to #COVID19 in #Italy (JAMA, summary)

[Source: JAMA, full page: (LINK). Summary, edited.]

Case-Fatality Rate and Characteristics of Patients Dying in Relation to COVID-19 in Italy

Graziano Onder, MD, PhD1; Giovanni Rezza, MD2; Silvio Brusaferro, MD3

Author Affiliations: 1 Department of Cardiovascular, Endocrine-Metabolic Diseases and Aging, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy; 2 Department of Infectious Diseases, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy; 3 Office of the President, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy

JAMA. Published online March 23, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.4683

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Only 3 cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) were identified in Italy in the first half of February 2020 and all involved people who had recently traveled to China. On February 20, 2020, a severe case of pneumonia due to SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) was diagnosed in northern Italy’s Lombardy region in a man in his 30s who had no history of possible exposure abroad. Within 14 days, many other cases of COVID-19 in the surrounding area were diagnosed, including a substantial number of critically ill patients.1 On the basis of the number of cases and of the advanced stage of the disease it was hypothesized that the virus had been circulating within the population since January.

(…)

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Corresponding Author: Graziano Onder, MD, PhD, Department of Cardiovascular, Endocrine-Metabolic Diseases and Aging, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Via Giano della Bella, 34-0161 Roma, Italy (graziano.onder@iss.it).

Published Online: March 23, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.4683

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported.

Additional Contributions: We thank the following members of the COVID-19 Surveillance Group who were involved in the collection of data used in this report: Xanthi Andrianou, Antonino Bella, Stefania Bellino, Stefano Boros, Marco Canevelli, Maria Rita Castrucci, Alessandra Ciervo, Fortunato D’Ancona, Martina Del Manso, Chiara Donfrancesco, Massimo Fabiani, Antonietta Filia, Cinzia Lo Noce, Alberto Mateo Urdiales, Luigi Palmieri, Patrizio Pezzotti, Ornella Punzo, Valeria Raparelli, Flavia Riccardo, Maria Cristina Rota, Andrea Siddu, Paola Stefanelli, Brigid Unim, Nicola Vanacore.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Italy.

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#COVID19 in #Europe: the #Italian #lesson (Lancet, summary)

[Source: The Lancet, full page: (LINK). Summary, edited.]

COVID-19 in Europe: the Italian lesson

We declare no competing interests.

*Andrea Saglietto, Fabrizio D’Ascenzo, Giuseppe Biondi Zoccai, Gaetano Maria De Ferrari

Division of Cardiology, Department of Medical Sciences, Città della Salute e della Scienza Hospital, University of Turin, Turin 10126, Italy (AS, FD’A, GMDF); Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Sapienza University of Rome, Latina, Italy (GBZ); and Mediterranea Cardiocentro, Napoli, Italy (GBZ)

Published Online March 23, 2020 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30690-5

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Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 is rapidly spreading worldwide,1 and WHO declared the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak a pandemic on March 11, 2020.2 The outbreak has hit Europe; as of March 20, 2020, Italy has the second-largest number of confirmed cases, after China. As elegantly presented by Andrea Remuzzi and Giuseppe Remuzzi,3 a rapid surge of cases is posing a serious threat to the Italian national health system because of the limited capacity of intensive care unit departments

(…)

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Italy.

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A #Doubt of Multiple #Introduction of #SARS-CoV-2 in #Italy: A Preliminary Overview (J Med Virol., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

J Med Virol 2020 Mar 19 [Online ahead of print]

A Doubt of Multiple Introduction of SARS-CoV-2 in Italy: A Preliminary Overview

Marta Giovanetti 1 2, Silvia Angeletti 3, Domenico Benvenuto 4, Massimo Ciccozzi 4

Affiliations: 1 Laboratório de Flavivírus, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 2 Laboratório de Genética Celular e Molecular, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. 3 Unit of Clinical Laboratory Science, University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome, Italy. 4 Unit of Medical Statistics and Molecular Epidemiology, University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome, Italy.

PMID: 32190908 DOI: 10.1002/jmv.25773

 

Abstract

The emergence of the novel beta Coronavirus, recently renamed as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, SARS-CoV-2, has raised serious concerns due to the virus rapid dissemination worldwide. Nevertheless, there is limited information about the genomic epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 circulating in Italy from surveillance studies. The shortage of complete genomic sequences available impairs our understanding of the SARS-CoV-2 introduction and establishment in the country. To better understand its dynamics in Italy, we analysed complete genomes of SARS-CoV-2 isolates, obtained directly from clinical samples. Our phylogenetic reconstructions suggest possible multiple introduction of SARS-CoV-2. Continued genomic surveillance strategies are needed to improve monitoring and understanding of the currently SARS-CoV-2 epidemics, which might help to attenuate public health impact of infectious diseases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Keywords: COVID-2019; Italian outbreak; phylogenetic inference.

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Italy; Genetics.

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