#Neurological Manifestations of Hospitalized Patients with #COVID19 in #Wuhan, #China: A Retrospective Case Series Study (SSRN, abstract)

[Source: SSRN, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Neurological Manifestations of Hospitalized Patients with COVID-19 in Wuhan, China: A Retrospective Case Series Study

18 Pages Posted: 2 Mar 2020

Ling Mao, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (Formerly Tongi Medical University) – Department of Neurology; Mengdie Wang, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (Formerly Tongi Medical University) – Department of Neurology; Shengcai Chen, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (Formerly Tongi Medical University) – Department of Neurology; Quanwei He, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (Formerly Tongi Medical University) – Department of Neurology; Jiang Chang, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (Formerly Tongi Medical University) – Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics; Candong Hong, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (Formerly Tongi Medical University) – Department of Neurology; Yifan Zhou, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (Formerly Tongi Medical University) – Department of Neurology; David Wang, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center – Neurovascular Division; Xiaoping Miao, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (Formerly Tongi Medical University) – Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics; Yu Hu, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (Formerly Tongi Medical University) – Institute of Hematology; Huazhong University of Science and Technology (Formerly Tongi Medical University) – Collaborative Innovation Center of Hematology; Yanan Li, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (Formerly Tongi Medical University) – Department of Neurology; Huijuan Jin, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (Formerly Tongi Medical University) – Department of Neurology; Bo Hu, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (Formerly Tongi Medical University) – Department of Neurology

 

Abstract

Background:

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) from Wuhan China is serious and has the potential to become epidemic unfortunately worldwide. We aimed to describe the neurological manifestations of patients with COVID-19.

Methods:

In this retrospective, observational study, we enrolled two hundred fourteen hospitalized patients with laboratory confirmed diagnosis of severe acute respiratory syndrome from coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in three designated COVID-19 care hospitals of the Union Hospitals of Huazhong University of Science and Technology in Wuhan, China. Data were collected from 16 January 2020 to 19 February 2020. Neurological symptoms fall into three categories: central nervous system (CNS) symptoms or diseases (headache, dizziness, impaired consciousness, ataxia, acute cerebrovascular disease, and epilepsy), peripheral nervous system (PNS) symptoms (hypogeusia, hyposmia, hypopsia, and neuralgia), and skeletal muscle injury. Data of all neurological symptoms were checked by two trained neurologists.

Findings:

Of 214 patients studied, 88 (41.1%) were severe and 126 (58.9%) were non-severe patients. Compared with non-severe patients, severe patients were older (58.7 ± 15.0 years vs 48.9 ± 14.7 years), had more underlying disorders (42 [47.7%] vs 41 [32.5%]), especially hypertension (32 [36.4%] vs 19 [15.1%]), and showed less typical symptoms such as fever (40 [45.5%] vs 92 [73%]) and cough (30 [34.1%] vs 77 [61.1%]). Seventy-eight (36.4%) patients had neurologic manifestations. More severe patients were likely to have neurologic symptoms (40 [45.5%] vs 38 [30.2%]), such as acute cerebrovascular diseases (5 [5.7%] vs 1 [0.8%]), impaired consciousness (13 [14.8%] vs 3 [2.4%]) and skeletal muscle injury (17 [19.3%] vs 6 [4.8%]).

Interpretation:

Compared with non-severe patients with COVID-19, severe patients commonly had neurologic symptoms manifested as acute cerebrovascular diseases, impaired consciousness and skeletal muscle injury.

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Funding Statement: The authors stated: “None.”

Declaration of Interests: The authors declare no competing interests.

Ethics Approval Statement: The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of Union hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China. Verbal consent was obtained from patients before the enrollment.

Keywords: Coronavirus; COVID-19; Neurological Manifestations; retrospective case series study

Suggested Citation: Mao, Ling and Wang, Mengdie and Chen, Shengcai and He, Quanwei and Chang, Jiang and Hong, Candong and Zhou, Yifan and Wang, David and Miao, Xiaoping and Hu, Yu and Li, Yanan and Jin, Huijuan and Hu, Bo, Neurological Manifestations of Hospitalized Patients with COVID-19 in Wuhan, China: A Retrospective Case Series Study (February 24, 2020). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3544840

Keywords: COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2; China; Neurology.

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#Neurodevelopmental #Abnormalities in #Children With In Utero #Zika Virus Exposure Without Congenital Zika Syndrome (JAMA Pediatr., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

JAMA Pediatr. 2020 Jan 6. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2019.5204. [Epub ahead of print]

Neurodevelopmental Abnormalities in Children With In Utero Zika Virus Exposure Without Congenital Zika Syndrome.

Mulkey SB1,2,3, Arroyave-Wessel M1, Peyton C4, Bulas DI1,5, Fourzali Y6, Jiang J1, Russo S1, McCarter R1, Msall ME7, du Plessis AJ1,2,3, DeBiasi RL1,2,8, Cure C9.

Author information: 1 Children’s National Hospital, Washington, DC. 2 Department of Pediatrics, The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC. 3 Department of Neurology, The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC. 4 Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois. 5 Department of Radiology, The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC. 6 Sabbag Radiologos, Barranquilla, Colombia. 7 Kennedy Research Center on Neurodevelopmental Disabilities, University of Chicago Comer Children’s Hospital, Chicago, Illinois. 8 Department of Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease, The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC. 9 BIOMELAB, Barranquilla, Colombia.

 

Abstract

IMPORTANCE:

The number of children who were born to mothers with Zika virus (ZIKV) infection during pregnancy but who did not have apparent disability at birth is large, warranting the study of the risk for neurodevelopmental impairment in this population without congenital Zika syndrome (CZS).

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate whether infants without CZS but who were exposed to ZIKV in utero have normal neurodevelopmental outcomes until 18 months of age.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

This cohort study prospectively enrolled a group of pregnant women with ZIKV in Atlántico Department, Colombia, and in Washington, DC. With this cohort, we performed a longitudinal study of infant neurodevelopment. Infants born between August 1, 2016, and November 30, 2017, were included if they were live born, had normal fetal brain findings on magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography, were normocephalic at birth, and had normal examination results without clinical evidence of CZS. Seventy-seven infants born in Colombia, but 0 infants born in the United States, met the inclusion criteria.

EXPOSURES:

Prenatal ZIKV exposure.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES:

Infant development was assessed by the Warner Initial Developmental Evaluation of Adaptive and Functional Skills (WIDEA) and the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) at 1 or 2 time points between 4 and 18 months of age. The WIDEA and AIMS scores were converted to z scores compared with normative samples. Longitudinal mixed-effects regression models based on bootstrap resampling methods estimated scores over time, accounting for gestational age at maternal ZIKV infection and infant age at assessment. Results were presented as slope coefficients with 2-tailed P values based on z statistics that tested whether the coefficient differed from 0 (no change).

RESULTS:

Of the 77 Colombian infants included in this cohort study, 70 (91%) had no CZS and underwent neurodevelopmental assessments. Forty infants (57%) were evaluated between 4 and 8 months of age at a median (interquartile range [IQR]) age of 5.9 (5.3-6.5) months, and 60 (86%) underwent assessment between 9 and 18 months of age at a median (IQR) age of 13.0 (11.2-16.4) months. The WIDEA total score (coefficients: age = -0.227 vs age2 = 0.006; P < .003) and self-care domain score (coefficients: age = -0.238 vs age2 = 0.01; P < .008) showed curvilinear associations with age. Other domain scores showed linear declines with increasing age based on coefficients for communication (-0.036; P = .001), social cognition (-0.10; P < .001), and mobility (-0.14; P < .001). The AIMS scores were similar to the normative sample over time (95% CI, -0.107 to 0.037; P = .34). Nineteen of 57 infants (33%) who underwent postnatal cranial ultrasonography had a nonspecific, mild finding. No difference was found in the decline of WIDEA z scores between infants with and those without cranial ultrasonography findings except for a complex interactive relationship involving the social cognition domain (P < .049). The AIMS z scores were lower in infants with nonspecific cranial ultrasonography findings (-0.49; P = .07).

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE:

This study found that infants with in utero ZIKV exposure without CZS appeared at risk for abnormal neurodevelopmental outcomes in the first 18 months of life. Long-term neurodevelopmental surveillance of all newborns with ZIKV exposure is recommended.

PMID: 31904798 DOI: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2019.5204

Keywords: Zika Virus; Zika Congenital Infection; Psychiatry; Neurology.

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An #update on #Toscana virus #distribution, #genetics, medical and diagnostic aspects (Clin Microbiol Infect., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Clin Microbiol Infect. 2020 Jan 2. pii: S1198-743X(19)30672-X. doi: 10.1016/j.cmi.2019.12.015. [Epub ahead of print]

An update on Toscana virus distribution, genetics, medical and diagnostic aspects.

Ayhan N1, Charrel RN2.

Author information: 1 Unite des Virus Emergents (Aix-Marseille Univ – IRD 190 – Inserm 1207 – IHU Mediterranee Infection), Marseille, France; EA7310, Laboratoire de Virologie, Université de Corse-Inserm, Corte, France. 2 Unite des Virus Emergents (Aix-Marseille Univ – IRD 190 – Inserm 1207 – IHU Mediterranee Infection), Marseille, France. Electronic address: remi.charrel@univ-amu.fr.

 

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Toscana virus is an arbovirus transmitted by sand flies within the Mediterranean area where it can cause febrile illness and neuroinvasive infections during the seasonal circulation period of the vector. Although it is an important cause of meningitis and encephalitis, it remains a neglected virus with limited published data as demonstrated by less than 250 peer-reviewed articles since the 1970’s.

OBJECTIVES:

The last review article on Toscana virus was published in 2012. The aim was to compile peer-reviewed articles in order to provide an updated review highlighting recent findings to complement previous review articles.

SOURCES:

PubMed database was searched using the “Toscana virus” keyword from 2010 to present. A total of 152 articles were retrieved and identified studies were assessed for novel information on virus genetics, and geographic and medical aspects compared with existing knowledge reported in previous review articles.

CONTENT:

Studies addressing medical, veterinary and entomological aspects have provided evidence that Toscana virus is present in North Africa, in the Balkan Peninsula, and in most of the Mediterranean islands. Beside the two previously recognized genetic lineages, a novel evolutionary lineage has been identified in the Balkan Peninsula. Co-circulation of two genetic lineages has been demonstrated in France, in Turkey and in Croatia. In addition to meningitis and meningo-encephalitis that have been reported for forty years, various neuroinvasive forms have been recently reported such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, hydrocephalus, myositis, fasciitis, polymyeloradiculopathy, deafness, facial paralysis.

IMPLICATION:

Because it is endemic in countries bordering the Mediterranean, physicians should include Toscana virus in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with febrile illness and/or neurological manifestations.

Copyright © 2019. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

PMID: 31904562 DOI: 10.1016/j.cmi.2019.12.015

Keywords: Arbovirus; Toscana virus; Encephalitis; Meningitis; Neurology.

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#Review of #neuroimaging #findings in #congenital #Zika virus syndrome and its relation to the time of infection (Neuroradiol J., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Neuroradiol J. 2020 Jan 2:1971400919896264. doi: 10.1177/1971400919896264. [Epub ahead of print]

Review of neuroimaging findings in congenital Zika virus syndrome and its relation to the time of infection.

Radaelli G1, Lahorgue Nunes M1,2,3, Bernardi Soder R1,3, de Oliveira JM1, Thays Konat Bruzzo F1, Kalil Neto F1, Leal-Conceição E1, Wetters Portuguez M1,3, Costa da Costa J1,2,3.

Author information: 1 Brain Institute of Rio Grande do Sul (BraIns), Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. 2 CNPq, Brazil. 3 School of Medicine, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

 

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Many original articles and case series have been published emphasizing the neuroimaging findings of congenital Zika virus (ZIKV) infection. The majority of these studies do not follow a neuroradiological methodology to describe malformations and brain abnormalities resulting from ZIKV infection. The cause-and-effect correlation between the gestational period of maternal infection and the severity of encephalic changes at birth has rarely been reported. A systematic literature review was conducted on the neuroimaging findings in children affected with microcephaly due to ZIKV.

METHODS:

PubMed, Cochrane Library and Web of Science were searched for full-text articles published up to July 2019. Duplicate entries were removed. Two independent reviewers performed a quality assessment of all the studies included.

RESULTS:

A total of 2214 publications were identified. Of these 2170 were excluded by analysis of titles and abstracts, resulting in the inclusion of only eight articles. Chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests were performed with a 95% confidence interval to verify the statistically significant differences in the neuroradiological findings between the cases of ZIKV infection in the first or second trimester of gestation. The studies published so far have described image abnormalities at random, without utilizing any pre-established neuroradiological criteria, and imaging modalities with different sensitivity and accuracy have been used, which jeopardizes a reliable and adequate statistical analysis.

CONCLUSIONS:

Neuroimaging abnormalities are much more prevalent and severe when the infection by ZIKV is contracted in the first or second trimester of pregnancy.

KEYWORDS: Zika virus; magnetic resonance; microcephaly; tomography

PMID: 31896285 DOI: 10.1177/1971400919896264

Keywords: Zika Virus; Zika Congenital Syndrome; Neurology; Pediatrics; Imaging; Radiology.

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#Respiratory #illness and acute flaccid #myelitis in the #Tokai district in 2018 (Pediatr Int., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Pediatr Int. 2019 Dec 30. doi: 10.1111/ped.14128. [Epub ahead of print]

Respiratory illness and acute flaccid myelitis in the Tokai district in 2018.

Okumura A1, Numoto S1, Iwayama H1, Kurahashi H1, Natsume J2, Saitoh S3, Yoshikawa T4, Fukao T5, Hirayama M6, Takahashi Y2; Aichi Pediatric Clinical Study Group.

Author information: 1 Department of Pediatrics, Aichi Medical University, 1-1 Yazako Karimata, Nagakute, Aichi, 480-1195, Japan. 2 Department of Pediatrics, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi, 466-8550, Japan. 3 Department of Pediatrics, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi, 467-8601, Japan. 4 Department of Pediatrics, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, 1-98 Dengakugakubo, Kutsukake-cho, Toyoake, Aichi, 470-1192, Japan. 5 Department of Pediatrics, Gifu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu City, 501-1194, Japan. 6 Department of Pediatrics, Mie University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu, Mie, 5148507, Japan.

 

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

An outbreak of acute flaccid myelitis was chronologically correlated with that of severe respiratory illness in Japan in 2015. We hypothesized that increases in children hospitalized with severe respiratory illnesses might be associated with increase in acute flaccid myelitis also in autumn 2018.

METHODS:

We explored the temporal correlations between respiratory illness outbreaks and acute flaccid myelitis during autumn season between 2016 and 2018 using questionnaire surveys. One questionnaire explored the monthly numbers of children with acute flaccid myelitis, Guillain-Barre syndrome, and other acute flaccid paralyses. The other questionnaire explored the monthly numbers of children hospitalized with respiratory illnesses associated with wheezing. A correlation between the monthly numbers of children with acute flaccid myelitis and those with respiratory illness was analyzed by the Pearson correlation test.

RESULTS:

Although the number of patients hospitalized with respiratory illness did not correlate with the number of those admitted with myelitis, increases in children aged 7-12 and 13-19 years requiring ICU admission correlated temporally with an outbreak of acute flaccid myelitis.

CONCLUSIONS:

An increase in intensive care unit admissions to treat respiratory disease occurred in association with a cluster of acute flaccid myelitis. An increase in the number of ICU admission due to respiratory illness may be a clue to expect the occurrence of acute flaccid myelitis.

© 2019 Japan Pediatric Society.

KEYWORDS: acute flaccid myelitis; enterovirus D68; outbreak; respiratory illness; temporal correlation

PMID: 31886594 DOI: 10.1111/ped.14128

Keywords: EV-D68; Pediatrics; Japan; AFM.

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#Neurodevelopment of Nonmicrocephalic #Children, After 18 Months of Life, Exposed Prenatally to #Zika Virus (J Child Neurol., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

J Child Neurol. 2019 Dec 26:883073819892128. doi: 10.1177/0883073819892128. [Epub ahead of print]

Neurodevelopment of Nonmicrocephalic Children, After 18 Months of Life, Exposed Prenatally to Zika Virus.

Gerzson LR1, de Almeida CS2, da Silva JH3, Feitosa MMA4, de Oliveira LN5, Schuler-Faccini L6.

Author information: 1 Graduate Program in Child and Adolescent Health, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil. 2 Department of Physiotherapy, Physical Education and Dance, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil. 3 Graduate Program in Genetics and Molecular Biology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil. 4 Federal University of Amazonas, Manaus, Brazil. 5 Graduate Program in Science of Information, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil. 6 SIAT, Information Service on Teratogenic Agents, Medical Genetics Service, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil.

 

Abstract

The aim of this work was to evaluate the cognitive, language, and motor development, after 18 months of life, of nonmicrocephalic children born to mothers with Zika virus infection during pregnancy. Participants were 37 children aged 18-29 months divided into 2 groups: 17 nonmicrocephalic children born to mothers who had Zika virus infection during pregnancy (ZIKVG) and 20 nonmicrocephalic children with no maternal history of infection matched by sex and age (control group). A semistructured interview and the Bayley Scale of Infant and Toddler Development (Bayley III) were used for their evaluation. One child in the ZIKVG presented low cognitive score, the same in the control group. There were no statistical differences between the 2 groups regarding cognitive, language, and motor development. This sample, although small, showed that a significant proportion of nonmicrocephalic children exposed prenatally to Zika virus had normal development. A longer follow-up is necessary to observe if no other adverse outcomes will appear in the future.

KEYWORDS: Bayley III; ZIKV; child development; physiotherapy

PMID: 31878830 DOI: 10.1177/0883073819892128

Keywords: Zika Virus; Pregnancy; Pediatrics; Neurology.

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Delayed-onset #paraparesis in #Lassa fever: A case report (Int J Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Int J Infect Dis. 2019 Dec 19. pii: S1201-9712(19)30495-3. doi: 10.1016/j.ijid.2019.12.022. [Epub ahead of print]

Delayed-onset paraparesis in Lassa fever: A case report.

Duvignaud A1, Doutchi M2, Abejegah C3, Etafo I4, Jaspard M5, Serra B6, Tricaud E7, Levy-Marchal C8, Anglaret X9, Ahmed LA10, Adedosu AN11, Malvy D12, Ayodeji OO13.

Author information: 1 Inserm U1219, University of Bordeaux, 146 Rue Léo Saignat, 33076 Bordeaux, France; Department of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Division of Tropical Medicine and Clinical International Health, CHU de Bordeaux, Hôpital Pellegrin, Place Amélie Raba Léon, 33076 Bordeaux, France; Programme PAC-CI/ANRS Research Site, CHU de Treichville, 18 BP 1954 Abidjan 18, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. Electronic address: alex.duvignaud@gmail.com. 2 The Alliance for International Medical Action, Route de l’Aéroport, Rue NG 96 BP: 15530, Dakar, Senegal; Department of Infectious Diseases, Centre Hospitalier National de Zinder, Zinder, Niger. Electronic address: m.doutchi@yahoo.fr. 3 Infection Control and Research Centre, Community Health Department, Federal Medical Centre Owo, Michael Adekun Ajasin Road, PMB 1053, Owo, Ondo State, Nigeria. Electronic address: cabejegah2007@gmail.com. 4 Infection Control and Research Centre, Community Health Department, Federal Medical Centre Owo, Michael Adekun Ajasin Road, PMB 1053, Owo, Ondo State, Nigeria. Electronic address: eziunorijeoma2014@yahoo.com. 5 Inserm U1219, University of Bordeaux, 146 Rue Léo Saignat, 33076 Bordeaux, France; Programme PAC-CI/ANRS Research Site, CHU de Treichville, 18 BP 1954 Abidjan 18, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire; The Alliance for International Medical Action, Route de l’Aéroport, Rue NG 96 BP: 15530, Dakar, Senegal. Electronic address: marie.jaspard@coral.alima.ngo. 6 Inserm U1219, University of Bordeaux, 146 Rue Léo Saignat, 33076 Bordeaux, France; Programme PAC-CI/ANRS Research Site, CHU de Treichville, 18 BP 1954 Abidjan 18, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire; The Alliance for International Medical Action, Route de l’Aéroport, Rue NG 96 BP: 15530, Dakar, Senegal. Electronic address: beatrice.serra33@gmail.com. 7 Imagerie médicale du 109, Rue de Messei, Flers, France. Electronic address: elise.tricaud@gmail.com. 8 The Alliance for International Medical Action, Route de l’Aéroport, Rue NG 96 BP: 15530, Dakar, Senegal. Electronic address: claire.levy-marchal@coral.alima.ngo. 9 Inserm U1219, University of Bordeaux, 146 Rue Léo Saignat, 33076 Bordeaux, France; Programme PAC-CI/ANRS Research Site, CHU de Treichville, 18 BP 1954 Abidjan 18, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. Electronic address: Xavier.Anglaret@u-bordeaux.fr. 10 Department of Family Medicine, Federal Medical Centre Owo, Michael Adekun Ajasin Road, PMB 1053, Owo, Ondo State, Nigeria. Electronic address: akahmed2@yahoo.co.uk. 11 Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Laboratory, Federal Medical Centre Owo, Michael Adekun Ajasin Road, PMB 1053, Owo, Ondo State, Nigeria. Electronic address: nelsonadedosu@gmail.com. 12 Inserm U1219, University of Bordeaux, 146 Rue Léo Saignat, 33076 Bordeaux, France; Department of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Division of Tropical Medicine and Clinical International Health, CHU de Bordeaux, Hôpital Pellegrin, Place Amélie Raba Léon, 33076 Bordeaux, France; Programme PAC-CI/ANRS Research Site, CHU de Treichville, 18 BP 1954 Abidjan 18, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. Electronic address: denis.malvy@chu-bordeaux.fr. 13 Infection Control and Research Centre, Community Health Department, Federal Medical Centre Owo, Michael Adekun Ajasin Road, PMB 1053, Owo, Ondo State, Nigeria. Electronic address: femiayodeji@yahoo.com.

 

Abstract

Lassa fever (LF) is an endemic viral hemorrhagic fever in West Africa. Among the serious complications of the disease are neurological manifestations whose spectrum is incompletely known. Here we report the case of a 61-year-old man who developed a delayed-onset paraparesis a few weeks after getting infected with Lassa virus thereby suggesting a possible association between LF and spinal cord disorders.

Copyright © 2019. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

KEYWORDS: Acute Kidney Injury; Central Nervous System; Lassa fever; Myelitis; Nigeria; Paraparesis

PMID: 31866549 DOI: 10.1016/j.ijid.2019.12.022

Keywords: Lassa fever; Paraparesis; Neurology.

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