#Feeding Low-Income #Children during the #Covid19 #Pandemic (N Engl J Med., summary)

[Source: The New England Journal of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Summary, edited.]

Feeding Low-Income Children during the Covid-19 Pandemic

Caroline G. Dunn, Ph.D., R.D., Erica Kenney, Sc.D., M.P.H., Sheila E. Fleischhacker, J.D., Ph.D., and Sara N. Bleich, Ph.D.

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As Covid-19 spreads throughout the United States, schools and child care facilities are balancing their role of helping to prevent disease transmission with ensuring access to food for children who rely on the federal nutrition safety net. Together, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National School Lunch Program, School Breakfast Program, and Child and Adult Care Food Program serve nearly 35 million children daily, delivering vital nutrition and financial assistance to families in need.1 With such programs interrupted, an essential element of the Covid-19 response will be feeding children from low-income families.

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Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Poverty; Society; Pediatrics.

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#COVID19 #epidemic: disease characteristics in #children (J Med Virol., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Medical Virology, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

COVID‐19 epidemic: disease characteristics in children

She Jiatong,  Liu lanqin,  Liu Wenjun

First published: 31 March 2020 | DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.25807

This article has been accepted for publication and undergone full peer review but has not been through the copyediting, typesetting, pagination and proofreading process, which may lead to differences between this version and the Version of Record. Please cite this article as doi: 10.1002/jmv.25807

 

Abstract

In mid‐December 2019, a disease caused by infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus‐2 (SARS‐CoV‐2), which began in Wuhan, China, has spread throughout the country and many countries around the world. The number of children with coronavirus disease‐2019 (COVID‐19) has also increased significantly. Although information regarding the epidemiology of COVID‐19 in children has accumulated, relevant comprehensive reports are lacking. The present article reviews the epidemiological characteristics of COVID‐19 in children.

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Pediatrics.

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Detectable #SARS‐CoV‐2 Viral #RNA in #Feces of Three #Children during #Recovery Period of #COVID19 #Pneumonia (J Med Virol., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Medical Virology, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Detectable SARS‐CoV‐2 Viral RNA in Feces of Three Children during Recovery Period of COVID‐19 Pneumonia

Tongqiang Zhang,  Xiaojian Cui,  Xue Zhao,  Jinhu Wang,  Jiafeng Zheng,  Guifen Zheng, Wei Guo,  Chunquan Cai,  Sijia He,  Yongsheng Xu

First published: 29 March 2020 | DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.25795

This article has been accepted for publication and undergone full peer review but has not been through the copyediting, typesetting, pagination and proofreading process, which may lead to differences between this version and the Version of Record. Please cite this article as doi: 10.1002/jmv.25795

 

Abstract

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID‐19) is a newly emerging infectious disease caused by a novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS‐CoV‐2). After its first occurrence in Wuhan of China from December 2019, COVID‐19 rapidly spread around the world. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) statement on March 13, 2020, there had been over 132,500 confirmed cases globally. Nevertheless, the case reports of children are rare, which result in the lack of evidence for preventing and controlling of children’s infection. Here, we report 3 cases of SARS‐CoV‐2 infected children diagnosed from February 3 to February 17, 2020 in Tianjin, China. All of these three cases experienced mild illness and recovered soon after treatment, with the nucleic acid of throat swab turning negative within 14, 11, 7 days after diagnosis respectively. However, after been discharged, all the three cases were tested SARS‐CoV‐2 positive in the stool samples within 10 days, in spite of their remained negative nucleic acid in throat swab specimens. Therefore, it is necessary to be aware of the possibility of fecal‐oral transmission of SARS‐CoV‐2 infection, especially for children cases.

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Pediatrics.

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Retrospective Analysis of 61 Cases of #Children Died of #Viral #Pneumonia (Fa Yi Xue Za Zhi, abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Fa Yi Xue Za Zhi, 36 (2) 2020 Mar 25 [Online ahead of print]

Retrospective Analysis of 61 Cases of Children Died of Viral Pneumonia

[Article in English, Chinese]

X B Chen 1, S H Du 1, J C Lu 1, X H Tan 1, D R Li 1, X Yue 1, Q Wang 1, H J Wang 1, D F Qiao 1

Affiliation: 1 Department of Forensic Pathology, School of Forensic Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China.

PMID: 32212512 DOI: 10.12116/j.issn.1004-5619.2020.02.002

 

Abstract in English , Chinese

Objective

To retrospectively analyze the forensic and pathological postmortem examination and clinical data of children who died of viral pneumonia in identification of cause of death cases and to discuss the clinical characteristics and pathological features of viral pneumonia in children, in order to provide reference to pathological diagnosis of viral pneumonia in children caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection.

Methods

In this study, postmortem examination data from the institute of 61 cases of children whose cause of death were identified as viral pneumonia in recent years were collected. The gender, age, clinical symptoms and pathological features were comparatively analyzed.

Results

Among the 61 cases of children who died of viral pneumonia, most were within 2 years old (83.61%), and a large proportion died within 2 weeks after the onset of the disease (91.80%). General changes in postmortem examination included respiratory mucosal hyperemia, pleural effusion, pulmonary swelling, variegated pulmonary pleura and serosa, focal hemorrhage and edema of the cut surface of the lung. A large proportion of children had enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes (83.61%), and 21.31% of children had thymic dysplasia. Histopathological changes included pulmonary alveoli and interstitial edema, pulmonary hemorrhage, alveolar epithelial shedding, serous and (or) fibrous exudation in the alveoli, formation of viral inclusions, formation of transparent membranes, infiltration of inflammatory cells that mainly consisted of macrophages and lymphocytes in interstitial substance and alveoli. Viral infections often affected the heart and gastrointestinal tract.

Conclusion

The clinical symptoms of children with viral pneumonia are difficult to notice, and because their immune system is not fully developed and they have poor autoimmunity, they can easily get into a critical condition and even die. Through analysis of the characteristics of forensic autopsy and histopathological changes, this study could provide reference for pathological diagnosis of viral pneumonia.

Keywords: forensic pathology; viral pneumonia; autopsy; children; cases analysis.

Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine.

Conflict of interest statement – The authors of this article and the planning committee members and staff have no relevant financial relationships with commercial interests to disclose.

Keywords: Pneumonia; Pediatrics; China.

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#Neonatal Early-Onset #Infection With #SARS-CoV-2 in 33 Neonates Born to Mothers With #COVID19 in #Wuhan, #China (JAMA Pediatrics, summary)

[Source: JAMA Pediatrics, full page: (LINK). Summary, edited.]

Neonatal Early-Onset Infection With SARS-CoV-2 in 33 Neonates Born to Mothers With COVID-19 in Wuhan, China

Lingkong Zeng, MD1; Shiwen Xia, MD2; Wenhao Yuan, MD1; et al. Kai Yan, MD3; Feifan Xiao, MS3; Jianbo Shao, MD4; Wenhao Zhou, MD3

Author Affiliations: 1 Department of Neonatology, Institute of Maternal and Child Health, Wuhan Children’s Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China; 2 Department of Neonatology, Maternal and Child Health Hospital of Hubei Province, Wuhan, China; 3 National Children’s Medical Center, Children’s Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China; 4 Institute of Maternal and Child Health, Wuhan Children’s Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China

JAMA Pediatr. Published online March 26, 2020. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2020.0878

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The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread rapidly across the world. With the sharp increase in the number of infections, the number of pregnant women and children with COVID-19 is also on the rise. However, only 19 neonates born to affected mothers have been investigated, and to our knowledge, no information on early-onset infection in newborns has been published in previous studies.1,2

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Accepted for Publication: March 10, 2020.

Corresponding Author: Wenhao Zhou, MD, National Children’s Medical Center, Children’s Hospital of Fudan University, 399 Wanyuan Rd, Shanghai 201102, China (zhouwenhao@fudan.edu.cn).

Published Online: March 26, 2020. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2020.0878

Author Contributions: Dr Zeng had full access to all of the data in the study and takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis.

Concept and design: Zeng, Shao, Zhou.

Acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of data: All authors.

Drafting of the manuscript: All authors.

Critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content: Xia, Yuan, Xiao, Shao, Zhou.

Statistical analysis: Zeng, Yuan, Yan, Xiao.

Administrative, technical, or material support: Zeng, Xia, Yan, Shao, Zhou.

Supervision: Shao, Zhou.

Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported.

Additional Contributions: We thank Shoo K. Lee, MD, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Department of Public Health, University of Toronto, for editing assistance. He was compensated for his contribution. We thank the patients’ families for granting permission to publish this information.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Pregnancy; Pediatrics.

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#Challenges posed by #COVID19 to #children with #cancer (Lancet Oncology, summary)

[Source: Lancet Oncology, full page: (LINK). Summary, edited.]

Challenges posed by COVID-19 to children with cancer

Rishi S Kotecha

Published: March 25, 2020 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S1470-2045(20)30205-9

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The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has rapidly escalated into a global crisis. Although children are less likely to develop severe illness than adults, a study1
has now highlighted that infants and younger children (ie, ≤5 years) are more likely to develop severe clinical manifestations than older children (ie, ≥6 years), with immaturity of the immune system cited as a potential explanation. In turn, it is known that viral infections, including with other human coronaviruses, are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised children.2

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Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Pediatrics; Cancer.

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#COVID19 in #children: the #link in the #transmission #chain (Lancet Infect Dis., summary)

[Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, full page: (LINK). Summary, edited.]

COVID-19 in children: the link in the transmission chain

Alyson A Kelvin, Scott Halperin

Published: March 25, 2020 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(20)30236-X

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Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), emerged from Wuhan, Hubei province, China, in late 2019 and has now reached pandemic status.1 Coronaviruses typically cause mild upper respiratory tract infections;2  however, SARS-CoV-2,3 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV),4 and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV)5  have all been associated with severe illness and death. Common symptoms reported in adults with COVID-19 are fever, dry cough, and fatigue; severe cases have been associated with dyspnoea and bilateral ground-glass opacities on chest CT.3

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Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Pediatrics.

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