Higher #virulence of #swine #H1N2 #influenza viruses containing #avian-origin #HA and 2009 #pandemic PA and NP in #pigs and mice (Arch Virol., abstract)

[Source: Archives of Virology, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Higher virulence of swine H1N2 influenza viruses containing avian-origin HA and 2009 pandemic PA and NP in pigs and mice

Yunyueng Jang, Taehyun Seo & Sang Heui Seo

Archives of Virology (2020)

 

Abstract

Pigs are capable of harbouring influenza A viruses of human and avian origin in their respiratory tracts and thus act as an important intermediary host to generate novel influenza viruses with pandemic potential by genetic reassortment between the two viruses. Here, we show that two distinct H1N2 swine influenza viruses contain avian-like or classical swine-like hemagglutinins with polymerase acidic (PA) and nucleoprotein (NP) genes from 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses that were found to be circulating in Korean pigs in 2018. Swine H1N2 influenza virus containing an avian-like hemagglutinin gene had enhanced pathogenicity, causing severe interstitial pneumonia in infected pigs and mice. The mortality rate of mice infected with swine H1N2 influenza virus containing an avian-like hemagglutinin gene was higher by 100% when compared to that of mice infected with swine H1N2 influenza virus harbouring classical swine-like hemagglutinin. Further, chemokines attracting inflammatory cells were strongly induced in lung tissues of pigs and mice infected by swine H1N2 influenza virus containing an avian-like hemagglutinin gene. In conclusion, it is necessary for the well-being of humans and pigs to closely monitor swine influenza viruses containing avian-like hemagglutinin with PA and NP genes from 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses.

Keywords: Influenza A; Avian Influenza; Swine Influenza; H1N1pdm09; H1N2; Reassortant strain; Pigs; Animal models.

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#Reassortment and #adaptive #mutations of an emerging #avian #influenza virus #H7N4 subtype in #China (PLOS One, abstract)

[Source: PLOS One, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

OPEN ACCESS /  PEER-REVIEWED / RESEARCH ARTICLE

Reassortment and adaptive mutations of an emerging avian influenza virus H7N4 subtype in China

Bingqian Qu , Xue Li , Carol J. Cardona, Zheng Xing

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Published: January 17, 2020 / DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0227597

 

Abstract

Human infections with avian influenza viruses including H5, H7 and H9 hemagglutinin subtypes occur at a low rate. Among human infections with H7 viruses, regional outbreaks with H7N2, H7N3, H7N7 and H7N9 have been documented. Early in 2018, a human infection with a novel H7N4 avian influenza virus was reported in Jiangsu, China. This study is aimed at understanding the probable origin and molecular features of this emerging H7N4 virus. Genomic segments encoding hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) of H7Nx and HxN4 viruses were compared with this H7N4 strain by alignment and phylogenetic tree analysis. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the human H7N4 virus probably originated from multiple reassortments of avian H7N7 and H8N4 viruses for its HA and NA, respectively, and likely a regional uncharacterized virus for its internal segments. Our data excluded that circulating avian H9N2 viruses were the origin of the H7N4 internal segments, unlike the human H5N1 and H7N9 viruses that both had H9N2 backbones. This index case provided a unique opportunity to examine viral mutations by directly comparing the human isolate with its closest viral relatives isolated from avian species from the patient’s farm, which may suggest critical mutations required for viral adaptation in humans. Whole-genome scanning was performed and the sequences of the human and related avian H7N4 isolates were compared. Mutations in PB2 (E627K), PB2 (K683T), PB1-F2 (N47S), HA (N283D), HA(K321E), NA(A137V), NA(K296R) and M2 (C19Y) were identified in the human isolate while no mutations were found in PB1, NP, NS1, and NS2 of the human H7N4 compared to the avian H7N4 viruses. Our data in this report provide further evidence for the genesis of this novel H7N4 virus with a multi-reassortment model and show molecular changes that might be responsible for the transmission of this virus from chickens or ducks to and subsequent replication in humans.

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Citation: Qu B, Li X, Cardona CJ, Xing Z (2020) Reassortment and adaptive mutations of an emerging avian influenza virus H7N4 subtype in China. PLoS ONE 15(1): e0227597. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0227597

Editor: Florian Krammer, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, UNITED STATES

Received: August 26, 2019; Accepted: December 23, 2019; Published: January 17, 2020

Copyright: © 2020 Qu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Data Availability: All relevant data are within the manuscript

Funding: ZX; National Natural Science Foundation of China; Grant No. 81571993; www.nsfc.gov.cn/; The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Competing interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Keywords: Avian Influenza; H7N4; H7N7; H8N4; Reassortant strain; Human; China.

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Detection of a #Reassortant #H9N2 #Avian #Influenza Virus with #Intercontinental Gene Segments in a Resident #Australian Chestnut #Teal (Viruses, abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Viruses. 2020 Jan 13;12(1). pii: E88. doi: 10.3390/v12010088.

Detection of a Reassortant H9N2 Avian Influenza Virus with Intercontinental Gene Segments in a Resident Australian Chestnut Teal.

Bhatta TR1,2, Chamings A1,2, Vibin J1,2, Klaassen M1,3, Alexandersen S1,2,4.

Author information: 1 Geelong Centre for Emerging Infectious Diseases, Geelong, Victoria 3220, Australia. 2 School of Medicine, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria 3220, Australia. 3 Centre for Integrative Ecology, Deakin University, Victoria 3220, Australia. 4 Barwon Health, University Hospital Geelong, Geelong, Victoria 3220, Australia.

 

Abstract

The present study reports the genetic characterization of a low-pathogenicity H9N2 avian influenza virus, initially from a pool and subsequently from individual faecal samples collected from Chestnut teals (Anas castanea) in southeastern Australia. Phylogenetic analyses of six full gene segments and two partial gene segments obtained from next-generation sequencing showed that this avian influenza virus, A/Chestnut teal/Australia/CT08.18/12952/2018 (H9N2), was a typical, low-pathogenicity, Eurasian aquatic bird lineage H9N2 virus, albeit containing the North American lineage nucleoprotein (NP) gene segment detected previously in Australian wild birds. This is the first report of a H9N2 avian influenza virus in resident wild birds in Australia, and although not in itself a cause of concern, is a clear indication of spillover and likely reassortment of influenza viruses between migratory and resident birds, and an indication that any lineage could potentially be introduced in this way.

KEYWORDS: Chestnut teal; Eurasian lineage; H9N2; avian influenza virus; low pathogenicity; phylogenetic analysis; reassortant

PMID: 31940999 DOI: 10.3390/v12010088

Keywords: Avian Influenza; H9N2; Wild Birds; Reassortant strain; Australia.

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#Human #infection with a novel #reassortant #Eurasian-avian lineage #swine #H1N1 virus in northern #China (Emerg Microbes Infect., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Emerg Microbes Infect. 2019;8(1):1535-1545. doi: 10.1080/22221751.2019.1679611.

Human infection with a novel reassortant Eurasian-avian lineage swine H1N1 virus in northern China.

Li X1, Guo L1, Liu C2, Cheng Y3, Kong M1, Yang L3, Zhuang Z1, Liu J3, Zou M1, Dong X1, Su X1, Gu Q1.

Author information: 1 Tianjin Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China. 2 Jizhou District Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China. 3 Chinese National Influenza Center, National Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.

 

Abstract

Influenza A virus infections occur in different species, causing mild to severe respiratory symptoms that lead to a heavy disease burden. Eurasian avian-like swine influenza A(H1N1) viruses (EAS-H1N1) are predominant in pigs and occasionally infect humans. An influenza A(H1N1) virus was isolated from a boy who was suffering from fever and headache and designated as A/Tianjin-baodi/1606/2018(H1N1). Full-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis revealed that A/Tianjin-baodi/1606/2018(H1N1) is a novel reassortant EAS-H1N1 containing gene segments from EAS-H1N1 (HA and NA), classical swine H1N1(NS) and A(H1N1)pdm09(PB2, PB2, PA, NP and M) viruses. The isolation and analysis of A/Tianjin-baodi/1606/2018(H1) provide further evidence that EAS-H1N1 poses a threat to human health and greater attention should be paid to surveillance of influenza virus infection in pigs and humans.

KEYWORDS: EAS-H1N1; Influenza A virus; Phylogenetic analysis; molecular characteristics; triple-reassortant

PMID: 31661383 PMCID: PMC6830285 DOI: 10.1080/22221751.2019.1679611 [Indexed for MEDLINE] Free PMC Article

Keywords: Influenza A; Swine Influenza; H1N1; H1N1pdm09; Reassortant strain; Human; China.

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#Interspecies #Transmission of #Reassortant #Swine #Influenza A Virus Containing #Genes from Swine Influenza A #H1N1pdm09 and A(#H1N2) Viruses (Emerg Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Volume 26, Number 2—February 2020 / Research

Interspecies Transmission of Reassortant Swine Influenza A Virus Containing Genes from Swine Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H1N2) Viruses

Helen E. Everett  , Bethany Nash, Brandon Z. Londt1, Michael D. Kelly, Vivien Coward, Alejandro Nunez, Pauline M. van Diemen, Ian H. Brown, and Sharon M. Brookes

Author affiliations: Animal and Plant Health Agency, Weybridge, UK

 

Abstract

Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 (pH1N1) virus has become established in swine in the United Kingdom and currently co-circulates with previously enzootic swine influenza A virus (IAV) strains, including avian-like H1N1 and human-like H1N2 viruses. During 2010, a swine influenza A reassortant virus, H1N2r, which caused mild clinical disease in pigs in the United Kingdom, was isolated. This reassortant virus has a novel gene constellation, incorporating the internal gene cassette of pH1N1-origin viruses and hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of swine IAV H1N2 origin. We investigated the pathogenesis and infection dynamics of the H1N2r isolate in pigs (the natural host) and in ferrets, which represent a human model of infection. Clinical and virologic parameters were mild in both species and both intraspecies and interspecies transmission was observed when initiated from either infected pigs or infected ferrets. This novel reassortant virus has zoonotic and reverse zoonotic potential, but no apparent increased virulence or transmissibility, in comparison to pH1N1.

Keywords: Swine Influenza; Influenza A; Reassortant strain; H1N1pdm09; H1N2; Pigs; UK.

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Emergence of an #Eurasian #avian-like #swine #influenza A (#H1N1) virus from #mink in #China (Vet Microbiol., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Vet Microbiol. 2020 Jan;240:108509. doi: 10.1016/j.vetmic.2019.108509. Epub 2019 Nov 22.

Emergence of an Eurasian avian-like swine influenza A (H1N1) virus from mink in China.

Liu J1, Li Z1, Cui Y1, Yang H1, Shan H1, Zhang C2.

Author information: 1 College of Veterinary Medicine, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao, China. 2 College of Veterinary Medicine, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao, China. Electronic address: zhangchuanmei100@163.com.

 

Abstract

We evaluated the phenotype and genotype of a fatal influenza/canine distemper virus coinfection found in farmed mink in China. We identified a novel subtype H1N1 influenza virus strain from the lungs of infected mink designated A/Mink/Shandong/1121/2017 (H1N1). The results of phylogenetic analysis of 8 gene fragments of the H1N1 strain showed the virus was a swine origin triple-reassortant H1N1 influenza virus: with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 segments (PB2, PB1, PA, NP and M), Eurasian avian-like H1N1 swine segments (HA and NA) and classical swine (NS) lineages. The EID50/0.2 mL of this strain was 10-6.2 and pathogenicity tests were 100 % lethal in a mouse model of infection. We found that while not lethal and lacking any overt signs of infection in mink, the virus could proliferate in the upper respiratory tracts and the animals were converted to seropositive for the HA protein.

Copyright © 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS: Eurasian avian-like swine influenza virus; H1N1; Mink influenza virus; Phylogenetic analysis; Reassortment

PMID: 31902506 DOI: 10.1016/j.vetmic.2019.108509

Keywords: Avian Influenza; Swine Influenza; H1N1pdm09; H1N1; Reassortant strain; Wildlife; China.

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#H3N2 #avian #influenza viruses detected in live #poultry #markets in #China bind to #human-type #receptors and transmit in guinea pigs and ferrets (Emerg Microbes Infect., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Emerg Microbes Infect. 2019;8(1):1280-1290. doi: 10.1080/22221751.2019.1660590.

H3N2 avian influenza viruses detected in live poultry markets in China bind to human-type receptors and transmit in guinea pigs and ferrets.

Guan L1, Shi J1, Kong X1, Ma S1, Zhang Y1, Yin X1, He X1, Liu L1, Suzuki Y2, Li C1, Deng G1, Chen H1.

Author information: 1 State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Harbin Veterinary Research Institute, CAAS , Harbin , People’s Republic of China. 2 College of Life and Health Sciences, Chubu University , Aichi , Japan.

 

Abstract

The H3N2 influenza viruses became widespread in humans during the 1968 H3N2 pandemic and have been a major cause of influenza epidemics ever since. Different lineages of H3N2 influenza viruses are also commonly found in animals. If a different lineage of H3N2 virus jumps to humans, a human influenza pandemic could occur with devastating consequences. Here, we studied the genetics, receptor-binding properties, and replication and transmission in mammals of 15 H3N2 avian influenza viruses detected in live poultry markets in China. We found that the H3N2 avian influenza viruses are complicated reassortants with distinct replication phenotypes in mice. Five viruses replicated efficiently in mice and bound to both human-type and avian-type receptors. These viruses transmitted efficiently to direct-contact guinea pigs, and three of them also transmitted among guinea pigs and ferrets via respiratory droplets. Moreover, ferret antiserum induced by human H3N2 viruses did not react with any of the H3N2 avian influenza viruses. Our study demonstrates that the H3N2 avian influenza viruses pose a clear threat to human health and emphasizes the need for continued surveillance and evaluation of the H3N2 influenza viruses circulating in nature.

KEYWORDS: Avian influenza virus; H3N2; ferret; guinea pig; transmission

PMID: 31495283 PMCID: PMC6746299 DOI: 10.1080/22221751.2019.1660590 [Indexed for MEDLINE] Free PMC Article

Keywords: Avian Influenza; H3N2; Reassortant strain; Poultry; China; Animal models.

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