#Influenza A in #Bovine Species: A Narrative Literature Review (Viruses, abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Viruses. 2019 Jun 17;11(6). pii: E561. doi: 10.3390/v11060561.

Influenza A in Bovine Species: A Narrative Literature Review.

Sreenivasan CC1, Thomas M2, Kaushik RS3, Wang D4,5, Li F6,7.

Author information: 1 Department of Biology and Microbiology, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007, USA. chithra.sreenivasan@sdstate.edu. 2 Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007, USA. milton.thomas@sdstate.edu. 3 Department of Biology and Microbiology, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007, USA. radhey.kaushik@sdstate.edu. 4 Department of Biology and Microbiology, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007, USA. dan.wang@sdstate.edu. 5 BioSystems Networks and Translational Research Center (BioSNTR), Brookings, SD 57007, USA. dan.wang@sdstate.edu. 6 Department of Biology and Microbiology, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007, USA. feng.li@sdstate.edu. 7 BioSystems Networks and Translational Research Center (BioSNTR), Brookings, SD 57007, USA. feng.li@sdstate.edu.

 

Abstract

It is quite intriguing that bovines were largely unaffected by influenza A, even though most of the domesticated and wild animals/birds at the human-animal interface succumbed to infection over the past few decades. Influenza A occurs on a very infrequent basis in bovine species and hence bovines were not considered to be susceptible hosts for influenza until the emergence of influenza D. This review describes a multifaceted chronological review of literature on influenza in cattle which comprises mainly of the natural infections/outbreaks, experimental studies, and pathological and seroepidemiological aspects of influenza A that have occurred in the past. The review also sheds light on the bovine models used in vitro and in vivo for influenza-related studies over recent years. Despite a few natural cases in the mid-twentieth century and seroprevalence of human, swine, and avian influenza viruses in bovines, the evolution and host adaptation of influenza A virus (IAV) in this species suffered a serious hindrance until the novel influenza D virus (IDV) emerged recently in cattle across the world. Supposedly, certain bovine host factors, particularly some serum components and secretory proteins, were reported to have anti-influenza properties, which could be an attributing factor for the resilient nature of bovines to IAV. Further studies are needed to identify the host-specific factors contributing to the differential pathogenetic mechanisms and disease progression of IAV in bovines compared to other susceptible mammalian hosts.

KEYWORDS: Influenza A; MDBK cells; bovine; bovine cell cultures; bovine respiratory disease; bronchopneumonia; cattle outbreaks; epizootic cough; host restriction; ruminants; seroprevalence

PMID: 31213032 DOI: 10.3390/v11060561

Keywords: Influenza A; Influenza D; Bovine.

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gimi69

I am an Italian blogger, active since 2005 with main focus on emerging infectious diseases such as avian influenza, SARS, antibiotics resistance, and many other global Health issues. Other fields of interest are: climate change, global warming, geological and biological sciences. My activity consists mainly in collection and analysis of news, public services updates, confronting sources and making decision about what are the 'signals' of an impending crisis (an outbreak, for example). When a signal is detected, I follow traces during the entire course of an event. I started in 2005 my blog ''A TIME'S MEMORY'', now with more than 40,000 posts and 3 millions of web interactions. Subsequently I added an Italian Language blog, then discontinued because of very low traffic and interest. I contributed for seven years to a public forum (FluTrackers.com) in the midst of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014, I left the site to continue alone my data tracking job.

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