The #IHR(2005) and the re-establishment of #international #travel amidst the #COVID19 pandemic (J Trav Med., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Travel Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

The International Health Regulations (2005) and the re-establishment of international travel amidst the COVID-19 pandemic

Barbara J von Tigerstrom, Ph.D, Sam F Halabi, J.D, Kumanan R Wilson, M.D

Journal of Travel Medicine, taaa127, https://doi.org/10.1093/jtm/taaa127

Published: 04 August 2020

 

Highlight

As countries modify or lift travel restrictions implemented in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, some variation in approaches is to be expected, but harmonization is important to re-establishing international travel. Despite challenges, the International Health Regulations (2005) and WHO recommendations can provide a balance of consistency and flexibility.

Issue Section: Perspective

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This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; WHO; IHR(2005); Traveler Health.

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#COVID19 #cacophony: is there any orchestra conductor? (Lancet, summary)

[Source: The Lancet, full page: (LINK). Summary, edited.]

COVID-19 cacophony: is there any orchestra conductor?

Antoine Flahault

Published: March 18, 2020 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30675-9

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The first wave of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is currently invading the world, and several countries are now struggling to fight it or trying to delay its start to help smooth its peak size for the purpose of lowering morbidity and mortality, and thereby reduce the overall tension on their health-care system. China’s first major outbreaks of COVID-19 happened in January, 2020. Then South Korea, Iran, and Italy entered into this Ravel’s Bolero-like epidemic in late February and early March, 2020, and many other countries are preparing to play the same rhythmic pattern in the coming days and weeks.

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I declare no competing interests.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; WHO.

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#Scientists are sprinting to outpace the novel #coronavirus (Lancet, summary)

[Source: The Lancet, full page: (LINK). Summary, edited.]

Scientists are sprinting to outpace the novel coronavirus

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Soumya Swaminathan

Published: February 24, 2020 / DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30420-7

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The number of people with novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has risen above 75 000 globally, over 99% of whom are in China, with more than 900 cases in 25 other countries as of Feb 20, 2020.1,  2 Science, however, is stepping up to the challenge. Consider the example of Africa’s efforts to scale up its capacity to detect any cases of infection. On Feb 3, 2020, the only African countries with laboratories that could test for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) were South Africa and Senegal. This scarce capacity was a major concern for a continent bracing for possible infections. Just a fortnight later, WHO had sent testing kits to 27 countries on the continent, which are already being used.3

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TAG is the Director-General of WHO. SS is Chief Scientist at WHO. We declare no other competing interests.

Keywords: COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2; Pandemic preparedness.

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#PanStop: a decade of rapid #containment #exercises for #pandemic #preparedness in the #WHO Western #Pacific Region (Western Pac Surveill Response J., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Western Pac Surveill Response J. 2018 Winter; 9(5 Suppl 1): 71–74. Published online 2018 Dec 18. doi: 10.5365/wpsar.2018.9.5.012 | PMCID: PMC6902655

PanStop: a decade of rapid containment exercises for pandemic preparedness in the WHO Western Pacific Region

Edna Moturi,a Katherine Horton,a Leila Bell,a Lucy Breakwell,a and Erica Dueger a,b

Author information: {a} WHO Regional Office for the Western Pacific, Manila, Philippines. {b} Influenza Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, United States of America.

Correspondence to Erica Dueger (email: tni.ohw@raspw)

Copyright (c) 2018 The authors; licensee World Health Organization.

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution IGO License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo/legalcode), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. In any reproduction of this article there should not be any suggestion that WHO or this article endorse any specific organization or products. The use of the WHO logo is not permitted. This notice should be preserved along with the article’s original URL.

 

Summary

Rapid containment (RC) is one of the five priority interventions of the World Health Organization (WHO) Strategic Action Plan for Pandemic Influenza; (1) it relies on the concept that mass prophylactic administration of antiviral drugs, combined with quarantine and social distancing measures, could contain or delay the international spread of an emerging influenza virus. (2, 3) During a RC operation, mass antiviral prophylaxis treatment and non-pharmaceutical interventions are rapidly implemented within a containment zone surrounding the initial cases; active surveillance and additional activities are extended to a broader buffer zone where cases are most likely to appear based on the movements of cases and contacts. (2, 4) The strategy is dependent on the rapid (within three to five days) detection, investigation and reporting of initial cases; the efficacy and availability of antivirals and vaccines; and timely risk assessment and decision-making. In the Western Pacific Region, a stockpile of antiviral medication and personal protective equipment acquired through donations from the Government of Japan is warehoused in Singapore under the auspices of the Association of South-eastern Asian Nations (ASEAN), (5) and is managed under contract by the Japan International Cooperation System (JICS). (5) These supplies are reserved for early intervention when initial signs of increased human-to-human transmission of a highly contagious influenza virus occur.

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Keywords: Pandemic Influenza; Pandemic Preparedness; Antivirals; Asia Region; WHO.

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#Preparedness for #influenza #vaccination during a #pandemic in the #WHO Western #Pacific Region (Western Pac Surveill Response J., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Western Pac Surveill Response J. 2018 Winter; 9(5 Suppl 1): 11–14. Published online 2018 Dec 20. doi: 10.5365/wpsar.2018.9.5.001 | PMCID: PMC6902652

Preparedness for influenza vaccination during a pandemic in the World Health Organization Western Pacific Region

Leila Bell,a Lisa Peters,a James D Heffelfinger,a Sheena G Sullivan,b,c Alba Vilajeliu,a Jinho Shin,a Joseph Bresee,d and Erica Dueger a,d

Author information: {a} WHO Regional Office for the Western Pacific, Emerging Diseases Surveillance and Response. {b} WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. {c} Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. {d} Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.

Corresponding author: Erica Dueger (email: tni.ohw@raspw)

Copyright (c) 2018 The authors; licensee World Health Organization.

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution IGO License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo/legalcode), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. In any reproduction of this article there should not be any suggestion that WHO or this article endorse any specific organization or products. The use of the WHO logo is not permitted. This notice should be preserved along with the article’s original URL.

 

Summary

Influenza vaccination is a key public health intervention for pandemic influenza as it can limit the burden of disease, especially in high-risk groups, minimize social disruption and reduce economic impact. (1) In the event of an influenza pandemic, large-scale production, distribution and administration of pandemic vaccines in the shortest time possible is required. In addition, monitoring vaccine effectiveness, coverage and adverse events following immunization (AEFI) is important. Since seasonal influenza vaccination programmes require annual planning in each of these areas, establishing and strengthening annual influenza programmes will contribute to pandemic preparedness. (2) This paper presents efforts made in the World Health Organization (WHO) Western Pacific Region to improve seasonal influenza vaccination and pandemic preparedness.

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Keywords: Pandemic Influenza; Pandemic preparedness; Vaccines; WHO; Asia Region.

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The #truth about #PHEICs (Lancet, summary)

[Source: The Lancet, full page: (LINK). Summary, edited.]

The truth about PHEICs

Johan Giesecke, on behalf of STAG-IH †

Published: July 05, 2019 / DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(19)31566-1

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The recent decision by the WHO Director-General that the Ebola virus outbreak in DR Congo does not constitute a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC)1
has generated controversy, as articulated by the Editors2 of The Lancet. Members of the WHO Strategic and Technical Advisory Group for Infectious Hazards (STAG-IH) have discussed this Editorial and would like to clarify the role of the International Health Regulations (IHR) and the designation of a PHEIC.

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I declare no competing interests.

Keywords: Ebola; IHR(2005); PHEIC; Global Health.

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The #politics of #PHEIC (Lancet, summary)

[Source: Lancet, full page: (LINK). Summary, edited.]

The politics of PHEIC

The Lancet

Published: June 18, 2019 / DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(19)31406-0

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An emergency committee decided on June 14 that the current Ebola virus disease outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo did not warrant a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC). It was the third time the committee has decided against a PHEIC declaration since this Ebola outbreak began in August, 2018, which has now affected over 2100 people. WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus agreed with the committee’s advice but asserted the outbreak remains an emergency.

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© 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords: Ebola; DRC; Uganda; WHO; PHEIC.

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