A Confirmed Case of #SARS-CoV-2 Pneumonia with Routine RT – #PCR Negative and Virus #Variation in #Guangzhou, #China (Clin Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: Clinical Infectious Diseases, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

A Confirmed Case of SARS-CoV-2 Pneumonia with Routine RT-PCR Negative and Virus Variation in Guangzhou, China

Zhengtu Li, Yinhu Li, Lingdan Chen, Shaoqiang Li, Le Yu, Airu Zhu, Feng Yang, Qian Jiang, Liyan Chen, Jincun Zhao, Wenju Lu, Nanshan Zhong, Feng Ye

Clinical Infectious Diseases, ciaa941, https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciaa941

Published: 09 July 2020

 

Abstract

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pneumonia is a newly recognized disease, and its diagnosis is primarily confirmed by routine RT-PCR detection of SARS-CoV-2. However, we report a confirmed case of SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia with routine RT-PCR negative. This case has been finally diagnosed by Nanopore sequencing combined with antibody of SARS-CoV-2. Simultaneously, the ORF and NP gene variation of SARS-CoV-2 were found. This case has highlighted that false negative results could be present in the routine RT-PCR diagnosis, especially with virus variation. At the moment, Nanopore pathogen sequencing and antibody detection have been found effective in clinical diagnosis.

SARS-CoV-2, Pneumonia, Routine RT-PCR, Virus variation, Nanopore sequencing

Issue Section: Major Article

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© The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model)

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Diagnostic tests.

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#Household secondary #attack #rate of #COVID19 and associated #determinants in #Guangzhou, #China: a retrospective cohort study (Lancet Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: Lancet Infectious Diseases, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Household secondary attack rate of COVID-19 and associated determinants in Guangzhou, China: a retrospective cohort study

Qin-Long Jing, PhD †, Ming-Jin Liu, BS †, Zhou-Bin Zhang, MPH †, Li-Qun Fang, PhD †, Jun Yuan, MD †, An-Ran Zhang, BS, Natalie E Dean, BS, Lei Luo, PhD, Meng-Meng Ma, MD, Ira Longini, PhD, Eben Kenah, ScD, Ying Lu, MD, Yu Ma, MD, Neda Jalali, MS, Zhi-Cong Yang, MD, Yang Yang, PhD

Published: June 17, 2020 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(20)30471-0

 

Summary

Background

As of June 8, 2020, the global reported number of COVID-19 cases had reached more than 7 million with over 400 000 deaths. The household transmissibility of the causative pathogen, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), remains unclear. We aimed to estimate the secondary attack rate of SARS-CoV-2 among household and non-household close contacts in Guangzhou, China, using a statistical transmission model.

Methods

In this retrospective cohort study, we used a comprehensive contact tracing dataset from the Guangzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention to estimate the secondary attack rate of COVID-19 (defined as the probability that an infected individual will transmit the disease to a susceptible individual) among household and non-household contacts, using a statistical transmission model. We considered two alternative definitions of household contacts in the analysis: individuals who were either family members or close relatives, such as parents and parents-in-law, regardless of residential address, and individuals living at the same address regardless of relationship. We assessed the demographic determinants of transmissibility and the infectivity of COVID-19 cases during their incubation period.

Findings

Between Jan 7, 2020, and Feb 18, 2020, we traced 195 unrelated close contact groups (215 primary cases, 134 secondary or tertiary cases, and 1964 uninfected close contacts). By identifying households from these groups, assuming a mean incubation period of 5 days, a maximum infectious period of 13 days, and no case isolation, the estimated secondary attack rate among household contacts was 12·4% (95% CI 9·8–15·4) when household contacts were defined on the basis of close relatives and 17·1% (13·3–21·8) when household contacts were defined on the basis of residential address. Compared with the oldest age group (≥60 years), the risk of household infection was lower in the youngest age group (<20 years; odds ratio [OR] 0·23 [95% CI 0·11–0·46]) and among adults aged 20–59 years (OR 0·64 [95% CI 0·43–0·97]). Our results suggest greater infectivity during the incubation period than during the symptomatic period, although differences were not statistically significant (OR 0·61 [95% CI 0·27–1·38]). The estimated local reproductive number (R) based on observed contact frequencies of primary cases was 0·5 (95% CI 0·41–0·62) in Guangzhou. The projected local R, had there been no isolation of cases or quarantine of their contacts, was 0·6 (95% CI 0·49–0·74) when household was defined on the basis of close relatives.

Interpretation

SARS-CoV-2 is more transmissible in households than SARS-CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus. Older individuals (aged ≥60 years) are the most susceptible to household transmission of SARS-CoV-2. In addition to case finding and isolation, timely tracing and quarantine of close contacts should be implemented to prevent onward transmission during the viral incubation period.

Funding

US National Institutes of Health, Science and Technology Plan Project of Guangzhou, Project for Key Medicine Discipline Construction of Guangzhou Municipality, Key Research and Development Program of China.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Guangdong; China.

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#Clinical characteristics of patients infected with the novel 2019 #coronavirus (#SARS-Cov-2) in #Guangzhou, #China (Open Forum Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: Open Forum Infectious Diseases, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Clinical characteristics of patients infected with the novel 2019 coronavirus (SARS-Cov-2) in Guangzhou, China

Yaping Wang, Baolin Liao, Yan Guo, Feng Li, Chunliang Lei, Fuchun Zhang, Weiping Cai, Wenxin Hong, Yu Zeng, Shuang Qiu, Jian Wang, Yueping Li, Xilong Deng, Jianping Li, Guangming Xiao, Fengxia Guo, Xunxi Lai, Zhiwei Liang, Xueliang Wen, Pinghong Li, Qian Jiao, Fangfei Xiang, Yong Wang, Chenghui Ma, Zhiwei Xie, Weiyin Lin, Yanrong Wu, Xiaoping Tang, Linghua Li, Yujuan Guan

Open Forum Infectious Diseases, ofaa187, https://doi.org/10.1093/ofid/ofaa187

Published: 19 May 2020

 

Abstract

Background

The clinical manifestations and factors associated with the severity of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections outside of Wuhan are not clearly understood.

Methods

All laboratory-confirmed cases with SARS-Cov-2 infection hospitalized and monitored in Guangzhou Eighth People’s Hospital were recruited from 10 Jan to 20 Feb.

Results

A total of 275 patients were included in this study. The median patient age was 49 years, and 63.6% of them had exposure to Wuhan. The median virus incubation period was 6 days. Fever (70.5%) and dry cough (56.0%) were the most common symptoms. A decreased albumin level was found in 51.3% of patients, lymphopenia in 33.5%, and pneumonia based on chest computed tomography CT in 86%. Approximately 16% of patients (n = 45) had severe disease, and there were no deaths. Compared with patients with non-severe disease, those with severe disease were older, had a higher frequency of coexisting conditions and pneumonia, and had a shorter incubation period (all, P < 0.05). There were no differences between patients who likely contracted the virus in Wuhan, and those that had no exposure to Wuhan. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that older age, male sex, and decreased albumin level were independently associated with disease severity.

Conclusions

The frequency of patients with a severe SARS-CoV-2 infection in Guangzhou, China, was lower than in Wuhan, China. Early diagnosis and treatment is important for controlling SARS-CoV-2 infections.

SARS-CoV-2, epidemiology, clinical characteristics, risk factors, viral load

Issue Section: Major Article

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© The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America.

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial reproduction and distribution of the work, in any medium, provided the original work is not altered or transformed in any way, and that the work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Guangdong; China.

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Comments

Prolonged #Persistence of #SARS-CoV-2 #RNA in #Body #Fluids (Emerg Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  (CDC), Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Volume 26, Number 8—August 2020 | Dispatch

Prolonged Persistence of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in Body Fluids

Jiufeng Sun1, Jianpeng Xiao1, Ruilin Sun1, Xi Tang1, Chumin Liang, Huifang Lin, Lilian Zeng, Jianxiong Hu, Rinyu Yuan, Pingping Zhou, Jinju Peng, Qianlin Xiong, Fengfu Cui, Zhe Liu, Jing Lu, Junzhang Tian  , Wenjun Ma, and Changwen Ke

Author affiliations: Guangdong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou, China (J. Sun, J. Xiao, C. Liang, H. Lin, L. Zeng, J. Hu, R. Yuan, P. Zhou, J. Peng, Q. Xiong, F. Cui, Z. Liu, J. Lu, W. Ma, C. Ke); Guangdong Second Provincial General Hospital, Guangzhou (R. Sun, J. Tian); First People’s Hospital of Foshan, Foshan, China (X. Tang)

 

Abstract

We prospectively assessed 49 coronavirus disease cases in Guangdong, China, to estimate the frequency and duration of detectable severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 RNA in human body fluids. The prolonged persistence of virus RNA in various body fluids may guide the clinical diagnosis and prevention of onward virus transmission.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Guangdong; China.

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#Shenzhen’ #experience on containing 2019 novel #coronavirus-infected pneumonia #transmission (QJM Int J Med., summary)

[Source: QJM International Journal of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Summary, edited.]

Shenzhen’ experience on containing 2019 novel coronavirus-infected pneumonia transmission

Y Fang, S Zhang, Zhijian Yu, H Wang, Q Deng

QJM: An International Journal of Medicine,  hcaa112, https://doi.org/10.1093/qjmed/hcaa112

Published: 03 May 2020

Issue Section: Commentary

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The first novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2)-infected pneumonia (NCIP) patient outside Hubei Province was found in Shenzhen on 16 January 2020. It was an imported case from Wuhan city.1 As the largest migrant city in China, there are 1 030 000 migrants from Hubei Province, with 110 000 from Wuhan.2 At present, the number of infected cases (416 cases) in Shenzhen ranks top three in China outside Hubei. However, before the outbreak of NCIP, Shenzhen municipal government and hospitals had proactively taken forceful measures, which prevented the disease transmission in a powerful way at an early stage. As of 20 February, Shenzhen has not seen locally newly confirmed cases. Our hospital—Huazhong University of Science and Technology Union Shenzhen Hospital has not received newly confirmed cases for 30 days till 11 March. Meantime, till now, no medical workers have been infected. However, when the epidemic in under control and the number of newly added patients is dropping dramatically in China, the number of affected countries has tripled. There are 118 000 cases in 114 countries and 4291 people have lost their lives. Many medical workers have been infected and died. WHO made the assessment that COVID-19 can be characterized as a pandemic on 11 March 2020. We think that the epidemic prevention and control in Shenzhen are encouraging is partly because we acted ahead of time and have done a lot of work as below, so we hope to share our experience and help countries to combat the epidemic.

(…)

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; China.

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A #Tool to Early #Predict Severe #Coronavirus Disease 2019 (#COVID19) : A Multicenter Study using the #Risk #Nomogram in #Wuhan and #Guangdong, #China (Clin Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: Clinical Infectious Diseases, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

A Tool to Early Predict Severe Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) : A Multicenter Study using the Risk Nomogram in Wuhan and Guangdong, China

Jiao Gong, Jingyi Ou, Xueping Qiu, Yusheng Jie, Yaqiong Chen, Lianxiong Yuan, Jing Cao, Mingkai Tan, Wenxiong Xu, Fang Zheng, Yaling Shi, Bo Hu

Clinical Infectious Diseases, ciaa443, https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciaa443

Published: 16 April 2020

 

Abstract

Background

Due to no reliable risk stratification tool for severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients at admission, we aimed to construct an effective model for early identification of cases at high risk of progression to severe COVID-19.

Methods

In this retrospective three-centers study, 372 non-severe COVID-19 patients during hospitalization were followed for more than 15 days after admission. Patients who deteriorated to severe or critical COVID-19 and patients who kept non-severe state were assigned to the severe and non-severe group, respectively. Based on baseline data of the two groups, we constructed a risk prediction nomogram for severe COVID-19 and evaluated its performance.

Results

The training cohort consisted of 189 patients, while the two independent validation cohorts consisted of 165 and 18 patients. Among all cases, 72 (19.35%) patients developed severe COVID-19. We found that old age, and higher serum lactate dehydrogenase, C-reactive protein, the coefficient of variation of red blood cell distribution width, blood urea nitrogen, direct bilirubin, lower albumin, are associated with severe COVID-19. We generated the nomogram for early identifying severe COVID-19 in the training cohort (AUC 0.912 [95% CI 0.846-0.978], sensitivity 85.71%, specificity 87.58%); in validation cohort (0.853 [0.790-0.916], 77.5%, 78.4%). The calibration curve for probability of severe COVID-19 showed optimal agreement between prediction by nomogram and actual observation. Decision curve and clinical impact curve analysis indicated that nomogram conferred high clinical net benefit.

Conclusion

Our nomogram could help clinicians to early identify patients who will exacerbate to severe COVID-19, which will enable better centralized management and early treatment of severe patients.

COVID-19, Nomogram, Severe COVID-19 prediction, Risk stratification

Issue Section: Major ArticleThis content is only available as a PDF.

Author notes: These authors contributed equally to this work.

© The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model)

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Guangdong; Hubei; China.

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#Genomic #epidemiology of #SARS-CoV-2 in #Guangdong Province, #China (Cell Press, abstract)

[Source: Cell Press, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Journal pre-proof | DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2020.04.023

This is a PDF file of an accepted peer-reviewed article but is not yet the definitive version  of record. This version will undergo additional copyediting, typesetting and  review before it is published in its final form, but we are providing this version to give  early visibility of the article. Please note that, during the production process, errors may  be discovered which could affect the content, and all legal disclaimers that apply to the  journal pertain.

© 2020 The Author(s).

Genomic epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 in Guangdong Province, China

Jing Lu1,2,10, Louis du Plessis3,10, Zhe Liu1,2,10, Verity Hill4,10, Min Kang2, Huifang Lin1,2, Jiufeng Sun1,2, Sarah François3, Moritz U G Kraemer3, Nuno R Faria3, John T McCrone4, Jinju Peng1,2, Qianling Xiong1,2, Runyu Yuan1,2, Lilian Zeng1,2, Pingping Zhou1,2, Chumin Liang1,2, Lina Yi1,2, Jun Liu2, Jianpeng Xiao1,2, Jianxiong Hu1,2, Tao Liu1,2, Wenjun Ma1,2, Wei Li2, Juan Su2, Huanying Zheng2, Bo Peng5, Shisong Fang5,  Wenzhe Su6, Kuibiao Li6, Ruilin Sun7, Ru Bai7, Xi Tang8, Minfeng Liang8, Josh Quick9, Tie Song2, Andrew Rambaut4, Nick Loman9, Jayna Raghwani3, Oliver G Pybus3,11*, Changwen Ke2*

Affiliations: 1 Guangdong Provincial Institution of Public Health, Guangzhou 511430, China; 2 Guangdong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou 511430, China; 3 Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3SZ, UK; 4 Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh EH8 9YL, UK; 5 Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen 518055, China; 6 Guangzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou 510440, China; 7 Guangdong Provincial Second People’s Hospital, Guangzhou 510320, China; 8 Foshan First People’s Hospital, Foshan 528000, China; 9 Institute of Microbiology and Infection, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK; 10 These authors contributed equally; 11 Lead contact

* Correspondence: oliver.pybus@zoo.ox.ac.uk (O.G.P.), kecw1965@aliyun.com (C.K.)

 

Summary

COVID-19 is caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection and was first reported in central China in  December 2019. Extensive molecular surveillance in Guangdong, China’s most populous  province, during early 2020 resulted in 1,388 reported RNA-positive cases from 1.6  million tests. In order to understand the molecular epidemiology and genetic diversity of  SARS-CoV-2 in China we generated 53 genomes from infected individuals in Guangdong using a combination of metagenomic sequencing and tiling amplicon  approaches. Combined epidemiological and phylogenetic analyses indicate multiple independent introductions to Guangdong, although phylogenetic clustering is uncertain  due to low virus genetic variation early in the pandemic. Our results illustrate how the  timing, size and duration of putative local transmission chains were constrained by  national travel restrictions and by the province’s large-scale intensive surveillance and  intervention measures. Despite these successes, COVID-19 surveillance in Guangdong is  still required as the number of cases imported from other countries has increased.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Genetics; China; Guangdong.

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#Incidence of Novel #Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) #Infection Among People Under #Home #Quarantine in #Shenzhen, #China (Travel Med Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Travel Med Infect Dis, 101660 2020 Apr 2 [Online ahead of print]

Incidence of Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Infection Among People Under Home Quarantine in Shenzhen, China

Jingzhong Wang 1, Yi Liao 1, Xiaoyang Wang 2, Yichong Li 2, Dan Jiang 3, Jianfan He 4, Shunxiang Zhang 5, Junjie Xia 6

Affiliations: 1 Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen, China. 2 Shenzhen Municipal Health Commission, Shenzhen, China. 3 BGI Group, Shenzhen, China. 4 Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen, China. Electronic address: 912924370@qq.com. 5 Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen, China. Electronic address: zhangsx@szcdc.net. 6 Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen, China. Electronic address: 13602679063@139.co.

PMID: 32247931 DOI: 10.1016/j.tmaid.2020.101660

 

Abstract

Background:

Since the outbreak of 2019-nCoV in December, Chinese government has implemented various measures including travel bans, centralized treatments, and home quarantines to slowing the transmission across the country. In this study, we aimed to estimate the incidence of 2019-nCoV infection among people under home quarantine in Shenzhen, China.

Methods:

We used a stratified multistage random sampling method to recruit participants and collected demographic information and laboratory results of people under home quarantine. We conducted descriptive analysis to estimate the basic characteristics and to calculate the incidence in out study population.

Results:

A total of 2004 people under home quarantine participated in this study, of which 1637 participants finished the questionnaire with a response rate of 81.7%. Mean age of the participants was 33.7 years, ranging from 0.3 to 80.2 years. Of people who provided clear travel history, 129 people have traveled to Wuhan city and 1,046 people have traveled to other cities in Hubei province within 14 days before the home quarantine. Few (less than 1%) participants reported contact history with confirmed or suspected cases during their trip and most of these arrived at Shenzhen between Jan 24, 2020 to Jan 27, 2020. The incidence of COVID-19 in the sample was 1.5‰ (95% CI: 0.31‰-4.37‰).

Conclusion:

Home quarantine has been effective in preventing the early transmission of COVID-19, but that more needs to be done to improve early detection of COVID-19 infection.

Keywords: 2019-nCoV; Home quarantine; Incidence analysis; Travel history.

Copyright © 2020. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; China; Quarantine.

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#Challenges of #SARS-CoV-2 and #lessons learnt from SARS in #Guangdong Province, #China (J Clin Virol., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Clinical Virology, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Journal of Clinical Virology | Available online 3 April 2020, 104341 | In Press, Journal Pre-proof | Short communication

Challenges of SARS-CoV-2 and lessons learnt from SARS in Guangdong Province, China

Junguo Zhang a, Guanwen Lin b, Jie Zeng a, Jianguo Lin c, Junzhang Tian a, Guowei Li ad

{a} Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Methodology (CCEM), Guangdong Second Provincial General Hospital, Guangzhou, China; {b} Department of Infection Management, Guangdong Second Provincial General Hospital, Guangzhou, China; {c} P3 Biosafety Level Laboratory, Guangdong Second Provincial General Hospital, Guangzhou, China; {d} Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact (HEI), McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada

Received 26 February 2020, Accepted 25 March 2020, Available online 3 April 2020.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2020.104341

 

Highlights

  • It is the primary principle of ‘early detection, early reporting, early isolation, and early treatment’ in Guangdong for the combat of SARS-CoV-2 outbreak.

 

Abstract

With lessons learnt from the SARS outbreak in 2003, Guangdong Province is taking the lead in bringing COVID-19 under control by multiple strict regulations in combination with effective healthcare provision.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2 – COVID-19 – Guangdong Province

© 2020 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; SARS; China; Guangdong.

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#Shenzhen’ #Experience on #Containing 2019 Novel #Coronavirus-Infected Pneumonia #Transmission (QJM Int J Med., abstract)

[Source: QJM International Journal of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Summary, edited.]

Shenzhen’ Experience on Containing 2019 Novel Coronavirus-Infected Pneumonia Transmission

Yeqing Fang*1, Songrong Zhang*2, Zhijian Yu*1, Hongyan Wang1, Qiwen Deng1#

1.Huazhong University of Science and Technology Union Shenzhen Hospital, Shenzhen,
Guangdong Province,518012,China; 2.Science and Education Management Department, Shenzhen Baoan People’s Hospital, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518101, China; 3.# Corresponding Authors: Qiwen Deng, Email: qiwendeng@hotmail.com; 4.* Yeqing Fang, Songrong Zhang, Zhijian Yu contributed equally.

___

The first Novel Coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2)-Infected pneumonia (NCIP) patient outside Hubei Province was found in Shenzhen on January 16, 2020. It was an imported case  from Wuhan city[1]. As the largest migrant city in China, there are 1,030,000 migrants  from Hubei Province, with 110,000 from Wuhan[2]. At present, the number of infected  cases (416 cases) in Shenzhen ranks top three in China outside Hubei. However, before  the outbreak of NCIP, Shenzhen municipal government and hospitals had proactively  taken forceful measures, which prevented the disease transmission in a powerful way at  an early stage. As of February 20, Shenzhen has not seen locally newly confirmed cases.  Our hospital—Huazhong University of Science and Technology Union Shenzhen Hospital  has not received newly confirmed cases for 30 days till March 11. Meantime, till now, no medical workers have been infected.

(…)

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; China; Guangdong.

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