#Seroprevalence of #SFTS #Phlebovirus in Domesticated #Deer in South #Korea (Virol Sin., abstract)

[Source: Virologica Sinica, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Seroprevalence of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Phlebovirus in Domesticated Deer in South Korea

Authors: Min-Ah Yu, Kwang-Min Yu, Su-Jin Park, Young-Il Kim, Norbert John Robles, Young-Jae Si, Eun-Ha Kim, Hyeok-Il Kwon, Hye Won Jeong, Min-Suk Song, Seok-Yong Kim, Young Ki Choi

Research Article / First Online: 25 June 2019

 

Abstract

Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome phlebovirus (SFTSV) has a wide host range. Not only has it been found in humans, but also in many wild and domesticated animals. The infection of breeding deer on farms is a particularly worrisome public health concern due to the large amount of human contact and the diverse use of deer products, including raw blood. To investigate the prevalence of breeding domesticated deer, we examined the SFTSV infection rate on deer farms in South Korea from 2015 to 2017. Of the 215 collected blood samples, 0.9% (2/215) were found to be positive for viral RNA by PCR, and sequence analysis showed the highest homology with the KADGH human isolate. Both SFTSV-specific recombinant N and Gn protein-based ELISAs revealed that 14.0% (30/215) and 7.9% (17/215) of collected blood specimens were positive for SFTSV antibody. These results demonstrate that the breeding farm deer are exposed to SFTSV and could be a potential infection source for humans through direct contact or consumption of byproducts.

Keywords: Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome phlebovirus (SFTSV) – Breeding deer – Seroprevalence – South Korea

 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank all involved staffs in the diagnosis of SFTS during this study. We thank veterinarians at Sejeong Farms for collecting the samples. This work was supported by the Ministry of Health & Welfare (government—wide R&D fund project for infectious disease research (HG18C0029).

Author Contributions

M-AY and YKC conceptualized the study. M-AY, KMY, S-JP, Y-IK, NJR, Y-JS, E-HK, and H-IK, conducted the investigation. HWJ, M-SS, S-YK and YKC wrote the paper.

 

Compliance with Ethical Stanadards

Conflict of interest

The authors do not have any competing interests to declare.

Animal and Human Rights Statement

This work was supported by the Ministry of Health & Welfare (government – wide R&D fund project for infectious disease research (HG18C0029). Deer serum samples for the study were collected with the deer owner’s approval, and the experiments were conducted under the guidelines of the Chungbuk National University.

Keywords: SFTS; Phlebovirus; Livestock; Deers; S. Korea.

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SNX11 Identified as an Essential #Host Factor for #SFTS Virus #Infection by #CRISPR Knockout Screening (Virol Sin., abstract)

[Source: Virologica Sinica, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

SNX11 Identified as an Essential Host Factor for SFTS Virus Infection by CRISPR Knockout Screening

Authors: Tiezhu Liu, Jiajia Li, Yang Liu, Yuanyuan Qu, Aqian Li, Chuan Li, Quanfu Zhang,Wei Wu, Jiandong Li, Yan Liu, Dexin Li, Shiwen Wang, Mifang Liang

Research Article / First Online: 18 June 2019

 

Abstract

Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) is a highly pathogenic tick-borne bunyavirus that causes lethal infectious disease and severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) in humans. The molecular mechanisms and host cellular factors required for SFTSV infection remain uncharacterized. Using a genome-wide CRISPR-based screening strategy, we identified a host cellular protein, sorting nexin 11 (SNX11) which is involved in the intracellular endosomal trafficking pathway, as an essential cell factor for SFTSV infection. An SNX11-KO HeLa cell line was established, and SFTSV replication was significantly reduced. The glycoproteins of SFTSV were detected and remained in later endosomal compartments but were not detectable in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or Golgi apparatus. pH values in the endosomal compartments of the SNX11-KO cells increased compared with the pH of normal HeLa cells, and lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1) expression was significantly elevated in the SNX11-KO cells. Overall, these results indicated that penetration of SFTSV from the endolysosomes into the cytoplasm of host cells was blocked in the cells lacking SNX11. Our study for the first time provides insight into the important role of the SNX11 as an essential host factor in the intracellular trafficking and penetrating process of SFTSV infection via potential regulation of viral protein sorting, membrane fusion, and other endocytic machinery.

Keywords: CRISPR – screen – Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) – Host factor – Sorting nexin 11 (SNX11)

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article ( https://doi.org/10.1007/s12250-019-00141-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National Key Project for Infectious Disease from the Ministry of Science and Technology (Grant No. 2018ZX10711-001).

Author Contributions

TL performed the experiments and wrote the paper; Jiajia Li, YL, and YQ performed the experiments; AL, QZ, CL, WW, YL, and Jiandong Li contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools. Jiajia Li, TL, ML, YL, Jiandong Li, and DL analyzed and discussed the data. ML and SW designed the project and edited the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

 

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Animal and Human Rights Statement

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

Keywords: SFTS virus; Bunyavirus; CRISPR; Viral pathogenesis.

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#Prevalence and Molecular #Phylogenetic Analysis of #SFTS Virus in Domestic #Animals and #Rodents in #Hubei Province, #China (Virol Sin., abstract)

[Source: Virologica Sinica, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Prevalence and Molecular Phylogenetic Analysis of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus in Domestic Animals and Rodents in Hubei Province, China

Authors: Jing Cheng, Li Zhang, Bing Hu, Qin Wang, Ran Wu, Faxian Zhan, Shuang Rong,
Jianbo Zhan

LETTER / First Online: 03 June 2019

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Dear Editor,

In 2009, an outbreak of an unknown infectious disease occurred in rural areas of Hubei Province, China, affecting 17 persons, five of whom died. It was initially suspected to be human anaplasmosis (Zhang et al.2008). However, the laboratory evidence was insufficient to verify the diagnosis in most cases. In March 2011, a new virus was isolated from a patient’s blood and named severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) virus (SFTSV) in the Bunyaviridae (Yu et al.2011). The main signs and symptoms of SFTS are fever, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, and a decreased platelet count (Yu et al.2011; McMullan et al.2012; Zhang et al.2017; Hu et al.2018). Similar viruses have recently been identified in the United States, South Korea, and Japan (McMullan et al.2012; Kim et al.2013; Takahashi et al.2014; Zhan et al.2017a, b). The disease has a high mortality rate (12%–30%) (Yu et al.2011; Liu et al.2013). Based on the detection of SFTSV in Haemaphysalis longicornis ticks (Yu et…

(…)

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Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article ( https://doi.org/10.1007/s12250-019-00119-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was supported by the China Mega-Project for Infectious Diseases of the Ministry of Science and Technology and Ministry of Health of the People’s Republic of China (2018ZX10201002009007/2017ZX10103005003), a grant from Science and Technology Department of Hubei Province (2018CFB630), and a grant from the Opening Research Fund Program of the State Key Laboratory of Virology of China, Wuhan University (2017KF003), and a grant from Open Fund for Occupational Hazard and Identification in key Laboratory of Hubei Province (OHIC2017G02). We thank Prof. Mifang Liang and Prof. Quanfu Zhang (National Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) for guidance and technical support. We also thank all workers involved in clinical sample collection.

 

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Animal and Human Rights Statement

This research was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of Hubei province, which uses international guidelines for the care and use of animals have been followed. Informed consent was obtained from all study participants.

Keywords: SFTS; Wildlife; Hubei; China.

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Preexisting #chronic #conditions for #fatal #outcome among #SFTS patients: An observational Cohort Study (PLoS Negl Trop Dis., abstract)

[Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

OPEN ACCESS /  PEER-REVIEWED / RESEARCH ARTICLE

Preexisting chronic conditions for fatal outcome among SFTS patients: An observational Cohort Study

Shao-Fei Zhang , Zhen-Dong Yang , Mao-Lin Huang , Zhi-Bo Wang, Yuan-Yuan Hu, Dong Miao, Ke Dai, Juan Du, Ning Cui, Chun Yuan, Hao Li, Xiao-Kun Li, Xiao-Ai Zhang,  [ … ], Wei Liu

Published: May 28, 2019 / DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0007434 / This is an uncorrected proof.

 

Abstract

Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging infectious disease that is caused by a novel bunyavirus SFTSV. Currently our knowledge of the host-related factors that influence the pathogenesis of disease is inadequate to allow prediction of fatal outcome. Here we conducted a prospective study of the largest database on the SFTS patients, to identify the presence of comorbidities in SFTS, and estimate their effect on the fatal outcome. Among 2096 patients eligible for inclusion, we identified nine kinds of comorbidities, from which hyperlipidemia (12.2%; 95% CI: 10.8%–13.6%), hypertension (11.0%; 95% CI: 9.6%–12.3%), chronic viral hepatitis (CVH) (9.3%; 95% CI: 8.1%–10.5%), and diabetes mellitus (DM) (6.8%; 95% CI: 5.7%–7.9%) were prevalent. Higher risk of death was found in patients with DM (adjusted OR = 2.304; 95% CI: 1.520–3.492; P<0.001), CVH (adjusted OR = 1.551; 95% CI: 1.053–2.285; P = 0.026) and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) (adjusted OR = 2.170; 95% CI: 1.215–3.872; P = 0.009) after adjusting for age, sex, delay from disease onset to admission and treatment regimens. When analyzing the comorbidities separately, we found that the high serum glucose could augment diseases severity. Compared to the group with max glucose < 7.0 mmol/L, patients with glucose between 7.0–11.1 mmol/L and glucose ≥11.1 mmol/L conferred higher death risk, with the adjusted OR to be 1.467 (95% CI: 1.081–1.989; P = 0.014) and 3.443 (95% CI: 2.427–4.884; P<0.001). Insulin therapy could effectively reduce the risk of severe outcome in DM patients with the adjusted OR 0.146 (95% CI: 0.058–0.365; P<0.001). For CVH patients, severe damage of liver and prolongation of blood coagulation time, as well as high prevalence of bleeding phenotype were observed. These data supported the provocative hypothesis that treating SFTS related complications can attain potentially beneficial effects on SFTS.

 

Author summary

SFTS now brings about a substantial global public health concern. Preexisting chronic conditions were thought to increase risk of severe SFTSV infections, however with sparse data mining efforts. In this study, we quantified the frequency of chronic comorbidities in SFTS, estimated their contribution to disease severity, and separately evaluated the effect from diabetes mellitus and chronic viral hepatitis on resulting in fatal outcome.

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Citation: Zhang S-F, Yang Z-D, Huang M-L, Wang Z-B, Hu Y-Y, Miao D, et al. (2019) Preexisting chronic conditions for fatal outcome among SFTS patients: An observational Cohort Study. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 13(5): e0007434. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0007434

Editor: Patricia V. Aguilar, University of Texas Medical Branch, UNITED STATES

Received: January 8, 2019; Accepted: May 2, 2019; Published: May 28, 2019

Copyright: © 2019 Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Data Availability: All relevant data are within the manuscript and its Supporting Information files.

Funding: WL is supported by the China Mega-Project for Infectious Diseases (No. 2018ZX10713002), National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 81825019 and 81621005), and the Talent Program of Science and Technology of Beijing (No. Z181100006318008, Z171100001117089). HL is supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 81472005). QBL is supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 81703274) and Peking University Medicine Seed Fund for Interdisciplinary Research (BMU2018MX009). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Competing interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Keywords: Bunyavirus; SFTS.

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#Environmental #Risk #Factors and Geographic #Distribution of #SFTS in #Jiangsu Province, #China (Vector Borne Zoo Dis., abstract)

[Source: Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Environmental Risk Factors and Geographic Distribution of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome in Jiangsu Province, China

Dawei Zhang, Changkui Sun, Huiyan Yu, Jingxin Li, Wendong Liu, Zhifeng Li, Changjun Bao, Dapeng Liu, Nan Zhang, Fengcai Zhu, and Jianli Hu

Published Online: 17 Apr 2019 / DOI: https://doi.org/10.1089/vbz.2018.2425

 

Abstract

Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging natural focus, tick-borne disease caused by a novel bunyavirus named SFTS virus (SFTSV). The main purpose of this study was to analyze the environmental risk factors and geographic distribution of SFTS natural foci in Jiangsu Province. A retrospective space–time analysis by SaTScan software was used to detect clusters at the town level. The maximum entropy modeling method was applied to construct the ecological niche model and analyze the environmental risk factors, and then to draw the predicted risk map. The performance of the model was assessed using the area under the curve (AUC) and known occurrence locations. During the years 2010–2016, a total of 140 laboratory-confirmed indigenous SFTS cases occurred in Jiangsu Province, with 66 occurrence locations. The reported number of SFTS cases increased year by year and SFTS cases occurred from April to October with a peak between May and August each year. Three clusters detected by space–time scan statistical analysis were connected together and shared the similar ecological environmental characteristic of hilly landscape. Fifteen environmental variables with different percent contribution can influence the ecological niche model in different degrees, whereas slope (suitable range: 0.1–4) and maximum temperature of warmest month (suitable range: 32.8–34.2°C) as the key environmental factors contributed 46.1% and 23.2%, respectively. The model had high accuracy on prediction with the averaged training AUC of 0.926. Within a predicted risk map, potential areas at high risk and 10 previously unidentified endemic regions were recognized. The distribution of SFTS natural foci was under the influence of multidimensional environmental factors. Slope and maximum temperature of warmest month were the key environmental risk factors. These results provide a valuable basis for the selection of prevention and control strategies, and the identification of potential risk areas.

Keywords: Bunyavirus; SFTS virus; Jiangsu; China.

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#SFTS can masquerade as #HFRS (PLoS Negl Trop Dis., abstract)

[Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

OPEN ACCESS /  PEER-REVIEWED / RESEARCH ARTICLE

Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome can masquerade as hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome

Rui Qi, Xiang-rong Qin, Ling Wang, Hui-ju Han, Feng Cui, Hao Yu, Jian-wei Liu , Xue-jie Yu

Published: March 29, 2019 / DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0007308 / This is an uncorrected proof.

 

Abstract

Background

Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging viral hemorrhagic fever with a high fatality rate and high frequency of person-to-person transmission and is caused by SFTSV, a tick-borne Phlebovirus. Because SFTS has similar clinical manifestations and epidemic characters (such as spatial and temporal distributions) with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in China, we reason that SFTS patients might be misdiagnosed as HFRS.

Methodology/principal findings

Acute-phase sera of 128 clinically diagnosed HFRS patients were retrospectively analyzed for Hantavirus IgM antibodies with ELISA. Hantavirus-negative patients’ sera were further analyzed for SFTSV IgM antibodies with ELISA. ELISA showed that 73 of 128 (57.0%) of clinically diagnosed HFRS patients were IgM antibody positive to Hantaviruses. Among the 55 Hantavirus-IgM negative patients, four (7.3%) were IgM antibody positive to SFTSV. The results indicated that the four SFTS patients were misdiagnosed as HFRS. The misdiagnosed SFTS patients had clinical manifestations common to HFRS and were unable to be differentiated from HFRS clinically.

Conclusions

Our study showed that SFTS patients could be clinically misdiagnosed as HFRS. The misdiagnosis of SFTS as HFRS causes particular concern because it may increase the risk of death of SFTS patients and person-to-person transmission of SFTSV without proper care for and isolation of SFTS patients.

 

Author summary

SFTS were clinically misdiagnosed as HFRS. It could cause particular concern in China. Physicians could not rely heavily on the exposure history. Both SFTS and HFRS patients are treated based on the clinical diagnosis in China. Laboratory confirmation of both diseases is not performed in clinical hospitals and the patients’ blood was usually submitted to a local or provincial center for disease control and prevention. In most cases the confirmation diagnosis is to provide retrospective information rather than to guide clinical therapy. Therefore, physicians need to carefully differentiate SFTS and HFRS patients because the fatality of SFTS is much higher than HFRS and SFTS is easily spread from person to person by contacting infected blood or even through aerosol.

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Citation: Qi R, Qin X-r, Wang L, Han H-j, Cui F, Yu H, et al. (2019) Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome can masquerade as hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 13(3): e0007308. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0007308

Editor: Abdallah M. Samy, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University (ASU), EGYPT

Received: December 11, 2018; Accepted: March 15, 2019; Published: March 29, 2019

Copyright: © 2019 Qi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Data Availability: All relevant data are within the manuscript and its Supporting Information files.

Funding: This study was supported by National Natural Science Funds of China (No. 31570167). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Competing interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Keywords: SFTS; Hantavirus; HFRS.

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#Endemic #SFTS, #Vietnam (Emerg Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Volume 25, Number 5—May 2019 / Research Letter

Endemic Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome, Vietnam

Xuan Chuong Tran, Yeojun Yun, Le Van An, So-Hee Kim, Nguyen T. Phuong Thao, Phan Kim C. Man, Jeong Rae Yoo, Sang Taek Heo, Nam-Hyuk Cho, and Keun Hwa Lee

Author affiliations: The Hue University Hospital and Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Hue, Vietnam (X.C. Tran, L.V. An, N.T.P. Thao, P.K.C. Man); Ewha Womans University, Seoul, South Korea (Y. Yun); The Kyung Hee University, Seoul (S.-H. Kim); The Jeju National University College of Medicine, Jeju, South Korea (J.R. Yoo, S.T. Heo, K.H. Lee); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (N.-H Cho)

 

Abstract

Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS), a tickborne viral disease, has been identified in China, South Korea, and Japan since 2009. We found retrospective evidence of SFTS virus (SFTSV) infection in Vietnam, which suggests that SFTSV infections also occur in Vietnam, where the virus has not been known to be endemic.

Keywords: SFTS; Vietnam.

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