Complete #Genome Sequence of a Novel Swine Acute Diarrhea Syndrome #Coronavirus, CH/FJWT/2018, Isolated in #Fujian, #China, in 2018 (Microbiol Resour Announc., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Microbiol Resour Announc. 2018 Dec 6;7(22). pii: e01259-18. doi: 10.1128/MRA.01259-18. eCollection 2018 Dec.

Complete Genome Sequence of a Novel Swine Acute Diarrhea Syndrome Coronavirus, CH/FJWT/2018, Isolated in Fujian, China, in 2018.

Li K#1,2, Li H#1,2, Bi Z1,2, Gu J1,2, Gong W1,2, Luo S1,2, Zhang F1,2, Song D1,2, Ye Y1,2, Tang Y1,2.

Author information: 1 Key Laboratory for Animal Health of Jiangxi Province, Nanchang, Jiangxi, China. 2 Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, College of Animal Science and Technology, Jiangxi Agricultural University, Nanchang, Jiangxi, China. # Contributed equally

 

Abstract

The full-length genome sequence of a novel swine acute diarrhea syndrome coronavirus (SADS-CoV), CH/FJWT/2018, was determined, which was genetically most closely related to CN/GDWT/2017, recently discovered in Fujian, China. The indel sites of the spike (S) gene of CH/FJWT/2018 were most similar to those of bat-origin SADS-related coronaviruses.

PMID: 30533848 PMCID: PMC6284080 DOI: 10.1128/MRA.01259-18 Free full text

Keywords: Coronavirus; Pigs; SADS-CoV; Fujian; China.

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#Fatal #swine acute #diarrhoea syndrome caused by an #HKU2-related #coronavirus of #bat origin (Nature, abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Nature. 2018 Apr 4. doi: 10.1038/s41586-018-0010-9. [Epub ahead of print]

Fatal swine acute diarrhoea syndrome caused by an HKU2-related coronavirus of bat origin.

Zhou P1, Fan H2, Lan T3,4, Yang XL1, Shi WF5, Zhang W1, Zhu Y1, Zhang YW2, Xie QM3,4, Mani S6, Zheng XS1, Li B1, Li JM2, Guo H1, Pei GQ2, An XP2, Chen JW3,4, Zhou L3,4, Mai KJ3,4, Wu ZX3,4, Li D3,4, Anderson DE6, Zhang LB7, Li SY8, Mi ZQ2, He TT2, Cong F9, Guo PJ9, Huang R9, Luo Y1, Liu XL1, Chen J1, Huang Y2, Sun Q2, Zhang XL2, Wang YY2, Xing SZ2, Chen YS3,4, Sun Y3,4, Li J5, Daszak P10, Wang LF11, Shi ZL12, Tong YG13,14, Ma JY15,16.

Author information: 1 CAS Key Laboratory of Special Pathogens and Biosafety, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China. 2 Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing, China. 3 College of Animal Science, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China. 4 Key Laboratory of Animal Health Aquaculture and Environmental Control, Guangzhou, China. 5 Key Laboratory of Etiology and Epidemiology of Emerging Infectious Diseases in Universities of Shandong, Taishan Medical College, Taian, China. 6 Programme in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore. 7 Guangdong Key Laboratory of Animal Conservation and Resource Utilization, Guangdong Public Laboratory of Wild Animal Conservation and Utilization, Guangdong Institute of Applied Biological Resources, Guangzhou, China. 8 School of Public Health, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China. 9 Guangdong Key Laboratory of Laboratory Animals, Guangdong Laboratory Animals Monitoring Institute, Guangzhou, China. 10 EcoHealth Alliance, New York, NY, USA. daszak@ecohealthalliance.org. 11 Programme in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore. linfa.wang@duke-nus.edu.sg. 12 CAS Key Laboratory of Special Pathogens and Biosafety, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China. zlshi@wh.iov.cn. 13 Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing, China. tong.yigang@gmail.com. 14 School of Life Sciences, North China University of Science and Technology, Tangshan, China. tong.yigang@gmail.com. 15 College of Animal Science, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China. majy2400@scau.edu.cn. 16 Key Laboratory of Animal Health Aquaculture and Environmental Control, Guangzhou, China. majy2400@scau.edu.cn.

 

Abstract

Cross-species transmission of viruses from wildlife animal reservoirs poses a marked threat to human and animal health 1 . Bats have been recognized as one of the most important reservoirs for emerging viruses and the transmission of a coronavirus that originated in bats to humans via intermediate hosts was responsible for the high-impact emerging zoonosis, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) 2-10 . Here we provide virological, epidemiological, evolutionary and experimental evidence that a novel HKU2-related bat coronavirus, swine acute diarrhoea syndrome coronavirus (SADS-CoV), is the aetiological agent that was responsible for a large-scale outbreak of fatal disease in pigs in China that has caused the death of 24,693 piglets across four farms. Notably, the outbreak began in Guangdong province in the vicinity of the origin of the SARS pandemic. Furthermore, we identified SADS-related CoVs with 96-98% sequence identity in 9.8% (58 out of 591) of anal swabs collected from bats in Guangdong province during 2013-2016, predominantly in horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus spp.) that are known reservoirs of SARS-related CoVs. We found that there were striking similarities between the SADS and SARS outbreaks in geographical, temporal, ecological and aetiological settings. This study highlights the importance of identifying coronavirus diversity and distribution in bats to mitigate future outbreaks that could threaten livestock, public health and economic growth.

PMID: 29618817 DOI: 10.1038/s41586-018-0010-9

Keywords: Coronavirus; SARS; SADS-CoV; Pigs; Bats; China; Guangdong.

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