#Attacks on #HealthCare in #Syria — Normalizing #Violations of #Medical #Neutrality? (N Engl J Med., extract)

[Source: The New England Journal of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Extract.]

Perspective

Attacks on Health Care in Syria — Normalizing Violations of Medical Neutrality? [   !   ]

Michele Heisler, M.D., M.P.A., Elise Baker, B.A., and Donna McKay, M.S.

N Engl J Med 2015; 373:2489-2491 / December 24, 2015 / DOI: 10.1056/NEJMp1513512

______

Interview with Dr. Michele Heisler on attacks on physicians and health care facilities in Syria and the response from the international community. (11:57)  –| Listen |—/ –| Download |–

______

In July 2015, a 26-year-old pediatrician described to our team of Physicians for Human Rights (PHR) investigators his experiences in Aleppo, Syria’s most populous city. When he was a medical student in 2012, government forces detained and severely beat him. He now works as an emergency medicine physician and surgery resident in a hospital that has twice been bombed by the Syrian government. He lives in fear of being killed by bombs on his way to work or while there. His family wants him to leave Syria as they did, but he explained, “It’s our country, and if we leave, it will fall apart. At times, I think maybe I will leave and specialize and come back with better skills, but then I see how much the people need me. Maybe that’s the biggest thing that’s keeping me inside.”

(…)

Keywords: Research; Abstracts; Wars; Public Health; Society; Bioethics.

——–

Advertisements

#Public #funding for #research on #antibacterial #resistance in the JPIAMR countries, the #EC, and related #EU #agencies: a systematic observational analysis (The Lancet Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Articles

Public funding for research on antibacterial resistance in the JPIAMR countries, the European Commission, and related European Union agencies: a systematic observational analysis [      ]

Ruth Kelly, Ghada Zoubiane, Desmond Walsh, Rebecca Ward, Herman Goossens

Published Online: 18 December 2015 / Publication stage: In Press Corrected Proof / Open Access / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(15)00350-3

© 2015 Kelly et al. Open Access article distributed under the terms of CC BY. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

 

Summary

Background

Antibacterial resistant infections are rising continuously, resulting in increased morbidity and mortality worldwide. With no new antibiotic classes entering the market and the possibility of returning to the pre-antibiotic era, the Joint Programming Initiative on Antimicrobial Resistance (JPIAMR) was established to address this problem. We aimed to quantify the scale and scope of publicly funded antibacterial resistance research across JPIAMR countries and at the European Union (EU) level to identify gaps and future opportunities.

Methods

We did a systematic observational analysis examining antibacterial resistance research funding. Databases of funding organisations across 19 countries and at EU level were systematically searched for publicly funded antibacterial resistance research from Jan 1, 2007, to Dec 31, 2013. We categorised studies on the basis of the JPIAMR strategic research agenda’s six priority topics (therapeutics, diagnostics, surveillance, transmission, environment, and interventions) and did an observational analysis. Only research funded by public funding bodies was collected and no private organisations were contacted for their investments. Projects in basic, applied, and clinical research, including epidemiological, public health, and veterinary research and trials were identified using keyword searches by organisations, and inclusion criteria were based on the JPIAMR strategic research agenda’s six priority topics, using project titles and abstracts as filters.

Findings

We identified 1243 antibacterial resistance research projects, with a total public investment of €1·3 billion across 19 countries and at EU level, including public investment in the Innovative Medicines Initiative. Of the total amount invested in antibacterial resistance research across the time period, €646·6 million (49·5%) was invested at the national level and €659·2 million (50·5%) at the EU level. When projects were classified under the six priority topics we found that 763 (63%) of 1208 projects funded at national level were within the area of therapeutics, versus 185 (15%) in transmission, 131 (11%) in diagnostics, 53 (4%) in interventions, and only 37 (3%) in environment and 39 (3%) in surveillance.

Interpretation

This was the first systematic analysis of research funding of antibacterial resistance of this scale and scope, which relied on the availability and accuracy of data from organisations included. Large variation was seen between countries both in terms of number of projects and associated investment and across the six priority topics. To determine the future direction of JPIAMR countries a clear picture of the funding landscape across Europe and Canada is needed. Countries should work together to increase the effect of research funding by strengthening national and international coordination and collaborations, harmonising research activities, and collectively pooling resources to fund multidisciplinary projects. The JPIAMR have developed a publicly available database to document the antibacterial resistance research collected and can be used as a baseline to analyse funding from 2014 onwards.

Funding

JPIAMR and the European Commission.

Keywords: Research; Abstracts; Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Public Health; EU.

——-

Structural #Factors of the #MERS #Coronavirus #Outbreak as a #Public #Health #Crisis in #Korea and Future Response Strategies (J Prev Med Public Health, abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

J Prev Med Public Health. 2015 Nov;48(6):265-70. doi: 10.3961/jpmph.15.066. Epub 2015 Nov 30.

Structural Factors of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Outbreak as a Public Health Crisis in Korea and Future Response Strategies. [      ]

Kim DH1.

Author information: 1Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon, Korea.

 

Abstract

The recent Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) outbreak has originated from a failure in the national quarantine system in the Republic of Korea as most basic role of protecting the safety and lives of its citizens. Furthermore, a number of the Korean healthcare system’s weaknesses seem to have been completely exposed. The MERS-CoV outbreak can be considered a typical public health crisis in that the public was not only greatly terrorized by the actual fear of the disease, but also experienced a great impact to their daily lives, all in a short period of time. Preparedness for and an appropriate response to a public health crisis require comprehensive systematic public healthcare measures to address risks comprehensively with an all-hazards approach. Consequently, discussion regarding establishment of post-MERS-CoV improvement measures must focus on the total reform of the national quarantine system and strengthening of the public health infrastructure. In addition, the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention must implement specific strategies of action including taking on the role of “control tower” in a public health emergency, training of Field Epidemic Intelligence Service officers, establishment of collaborative governance between central and local governments for infection prevention and control, strengthening the roles and capabilities of community-based public hospitals, and development of nationwide crisis communication methods.

KEYWORDS: Healthcare systems; Infectious disease outbreak; Korea; Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus; Public health

PMID: 26639738 [PubMed – in process]

Keywords: Research; Abstracts; S. Korea; MERS-CoV; Public Health.

——-

#Ebola #Crisis Passes, but #Questions on #Quarantines Persist (NYT, Dec. 3 ‘15)

[Source: The New York Times, full page: (LINK).]

Ebola Crisis Passes, but Questions on Quarantines Persist [      ]

by SHERI FINK 

States often exceeded federal guidelines during the outbreak, sometimes with haphazard consequences, according to a new report.

(…)

Keywords: Ebola; Public Health; USA; Quarantine Measures; Civil Rights; Society.

——-