Estimating the #Asymptomatic #Proportion of #Coronavirus Disease 2019 (#COVID19) Cases on Board the Diamond Princess #CruiseShip, Yokohama, #Japan, 2020 (Euro Surveill., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Euro Surveill, 25 (10) Mar 2020

Estimating the Asymptomatic Proportion of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Cases on Board the Diamond Princess Cruise Ship, Yokohama, Japan, 2020

Kenji Mizumoto 1 2 3, Katsushi Kagaya 4 2, Alexander Zarebski 5, Gerardo Chowell 1

Affiliations: 1 Department of Population Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States. 2 Hakubi Center for Advanced Research, Kyoto University, Yoshidahonmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan. 3 Graduate School of Advanced Integrated Studies in Human Survivability, Kyoto University Yoshida-Nakaadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan. 4 Seto Marine Biological Laboratory, Field Science, Education and Reseach Center, Kyoto University, Shirahama-cho, Nishimuro-gun, Wakayama, Japan. 5 Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.

PMID: 32183930 DOI: 10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2020.25.10.2000180

 

Abstract

On 5 February 2020, in Yokohama, Japan, a cruise ship hosting 3,711 people underwent a 2-week quarantine after a former passenger was found with COVID-19 post-disembarking. As at 20 February, 634 persons on board tested positive for the causative virus. We conducted statistical modelling to derive the delay-adjusted asymptomatic proportion of infections, along with the infections’ timeline. The estimated asymptomatic proportion was 17.9% (95% credible interval (CrI): 15.5-20.2%). Most infections occurred before the quarantine start.

Keywords: COVID-19; Japan; asymptomatic; corona; outbreak; quarantine.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Japan.

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Initial #Investigation of #Transmission of #COVID19 Among #Crew Members During #Quarantine of a #CruiseShip — #Yokohama, #Japan, February 2020 (MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep., abstract)

[Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), MMWR Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Initial Investigation of Transmission of COVID-19 Among Crew Members During Quarantine of a Cruise Ship — Yokohama, Japan, February 2020

Early Release / March 17, 2020 / 69

Kensaku Kakimoto1; Hajime Kamiya2; Takuya Yamagishi2; Tamano Matsui2; Motoi Suzuki2; Takaji Wakita3

Corresponding author: Hajime Kamiya, hakamiya@niid.go.jp.

1 Field Epidemiology Training Program, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan; 2 Infectious Disease Surveillance Center, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan; 3 National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan.

All authors have completed and submitted the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors form for disclosure of potential conflicts of interest. No potential conflicts of interest were disclosed.

Suggested citation for this article: Kakimoto K, Kamiya H, Yamagishi T, Matsui T, Suzuki M, Wakita T. Initial Investigation of Transmission of COVID-19 Among Crew Members During Quarantine of a Cruise Ship — Yokohama, Japan, February 2020. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. ePub: 17 March 2020. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6911e2

 

Abstract

An outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) among passengers and crew on a cruise ship led to quarantine of approximately 3,700 passengers and crew that began on February 3, 2020, and lasted for nearly 4 weeks at the Port of Yokohama, Japan (1). By February 9, 20 cases had occurred among the ship’s crew members. By the end of quarantine, approximately 700 cases of COVID-19 had been laboratory-confirmed among passengers and crew. This report describes findings from the initial phase of the cruise ship investigation into COVID-19 cases among crew members during February 4–12, 2020.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Japan.

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Estimating the #asymptomatic proportion of #coronavirus disease 2019 (#COVID19) cases on board the #DiamondPrincess cruise ship, #Yokohama, #Japan, 2020 (Euro Surveill., abstract)

[Source: Eurosurveillance, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Estimating the asymptomatic proportion of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases on board the Diamond Princess cruise ship, Yokohama, Japan, 2020

Kenji Mizumoto1,2,3, Katsushi Kagaya2,4, Alexander Zarebski5, Gerardo Chowell3

Affiliations:1 Graduate School of Advanced Integrated Studies in Human Survivability, Kyoto University Yoshida-Nakaadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan; 2 Hakubi Center for Advanced Research, Kyoto University, Yoshidahonmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan; 3 Department of Population Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States; 4 Seto Marine Biological Laboratory, Field Science, Education and Reseach Center, Kyoto University, Shirahama-cho, Nishimuro-gun, Wakayama, Japan; 5 Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom

Correspondence:  Kenji Mizumoto

Citation style for this article: Mizumoto Kenji, Kagaya Katsushi, Zarebski Alexander, Chowell Gerardo. Estimating the asymptomatic proportion of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases on board the Diamond Princess cruise ship, Yokohama, Japan, 2020. Euro Surveill. 2020;25(10):pii=2000180. https://doi.org/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2020.25.10.2000180

Received: 20 Feb 2020;   Accepted: 12 Mar 2020

 

Abstract

On 5 February 2020, in Yokohama, Japan, a cruise ship hosting 3,711 people underwent a 2-week quarantine after a former passenger was found with COVID-19 post-disembarking. As at 20 February, 634 persons on board tested positive for the causative virus. We conducted statistical modelling to derive the delay-adjusted asymptomatic proportion of infections, along with the infections’ timeline. The estimated asymptomatic proportion was 17.9% (95% credible interval (CrI): 15.5–20.2%). Most infections occurred before the quarantine start.

©  This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Japan.

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#COVID19 in 2 Persons with Mild Upper Respiratory #Symptoms on a #CruiseShip, #Japan (Emerg Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Volume 26, Number 6—June 2020 / Research Letter

COVID-19 in 2 Persons with Mild Upper Respiratory Symptoms on a Cruise Ship, Japan

Takeshi Arashiro  , Keiichi Furukawa, and Akira Nakamura

Author affiliations: Asahi General Hospital, Chiba, Japan

 

Abstract

We describe 2 cases of COVID-19 in patients with mild upper respiratory symptoms. Both patients worked on a cruise ship quarantined off the coast of Japan. One patient had persistent, low-grade upper respiratory tract symptoms without fever. The other patient had rapid symptom cessation but persistent viral RNA detection.

Keywords: COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2; Japan.

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#Respiratory #illness and acute flaccid #myelitis in the #Tokai district in 2018 (Pediatr Int., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Pediatr Int. 2019 Dec 30. doi: 10.1111/ped.14128. [Epub ahead of print]

Respiratory illness and acute flaccid myelitis in the Tokai district in 2018.

Okumura A1, Numoto S1, Iwayama H1, Kurahashi H1, Natsume J2, Saitoh S3, Yoshikawa T4, Fukao T5, Hirayama M6, Takahashi Y2; Aichi Pediatric Clinical Study Group.

Author information: 1 Department of Pediatrics, Aichi Medical University, 1-1 Yazako Karimata, Nagakute, Aichi, 480-1195, Japan. 2 Department of Pediatrics, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi, 466-8550, Japan. 3 Department of Pediatrics, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi, 467-8601, Japan. 4 Department of Pediatrics, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, 1-98 Dengakugakubo, Kutsukake-cho, Toyoake, Aichi, 470-1192, Japan. 5 Department of Pediatrics, Gifu University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu City, 501-1194, Japan. 6 Department of Pediatrics, Mie University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu, Mie, 5148507, Japan.

 

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

An outbreak of acute flaccid myelitis was chronologically correlated with that of severe respiratory illness in Japan in 2015. We hypothesized that increases in children hospitalized with severe respiratory illnesses might be associated with increase in acute flaccid myelitis also in autumn 2018.

METHODS:

We explored the temporal correlations between respiratory illness outbreaks and acute flaccid myelitis during autumn season between 2016 and 2018 using questionnaire surveys. One questionnaire explored the monthly numbers of children with acute flaccid myelitis, Guillain-Barre syndrome, and other acute flaccid paralyses. The other questionnaire explored the monthly numbers of children hospitalized with respiratory illnesses associated with wheezing. A correlation between the monthly numbers of children with acute flaccid myelitis and those with respiratory illness was analyzed by the Pearson correlation test.

RESULTS:

Although the number of patients hospitalized with respiratory illness did not correlate with the number of those admitted with myelitis, increases in children aged 7-12 and 13-19 years requiring ICU admission correlated temporally with an outbreak of acute flaccid myelitis.

CONCLUSIONS:

An increase in intensive care unit admissions to treat respiratory disease occurred in association with a cluster of acute flaccid myelitis. An increase in the number of ICU admission due to respiratory illness may be a clue to expect the occurrence of acute flaccid myelitis.

© 2019 Japan Pediatric Society.

KEYWORDS: acute flaccid myelitis; enterovirus D68; outbreak; respiratory illness; temporal correlation

PMID: 31886594 DOI: 10.1111/ped.14128

Keywords: EV-D68; Pediatrics; Japan; AFM.

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#Influenza D Virus of New Phylogenetic #Lineage, #Japan (Emerg Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Volume 26, Number 1—January 2020 / Research Letter

Influenza D Virus of New Phylogenetic Lineage, Japan

Shin Murakami, Ryota Sato, Hiroho Ishida, Misa Katayama, Akiko Takenaka-Uema, and Taisuke Horimoto

Author affiliations: University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan (S. Murakami, H. Ishida, M. Katayama, A. Takenaka-Uema, T. Horimoto); Yamagata Livestock Hygiene Service Center, Yamagata, Japan (R. Sato)

 

Abstract

Influenza D virus (IDV) can potentially cause respiratory diseases in livestock. We isolated a new Japan IDV strain from diseased cattle; this strain is phylogenetically and antigenically distinguished from the previously described IDVs.

Keywords: Influenza D; Cattle; Japan.

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#Influenza A #variants with reduced susceptibility to #baloxavir isolated from #Japanese patients are fit and transmit through respiratory #droplets (Nat Microbiol., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Nat Microbiol. 2019 Nov 25. doi: 10.1038/s41564-019-0609-0. [Epub ahead of print]

Influenza A variants with reduced susceptibility to baloxavir isolated from Japanese patients are fit and transmit through respiratory droplets.

Imai M1, Yamashita M2, Sakai-Tagawa Y2, Iwatsuki-Horimoto K2, Kiso M2, Murakami J2, Yasuhara A2, Takada K2, Ito M2, Nakajima N3, Takahashi K3, Lopes TJS2,4, Dutta J5, Khan Z5, Kriti D5, van Bakel H5, Tokita A6,7, Hagiwara H7,8, Izumida N7,9, Kuroki H10, Nishino T7,11, Wada N7,12, Koga M13, Adachi E14, Jubishi D2,15, Hasegawa H3,16, Kawaoka Y17,18,19.

Author information: 1 Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. mimai@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp. 2 Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. 3 Department of Pathology, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan. 4 Influenza Research Institute, Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA. 5 Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA. 6 Clinic Bambini, Tokyo, Japan. 7 Members of the Tokyo Pediatric Association Public Health Committee, Tokyo, Japan. 8 Hagiwara Clinic, Tokyo, Japan. 9 Akebonocho Clinic, Tokyo, Japan. 10 Sotobo Children’s Clinic, Chiba, Japan. 11 Alpaca Kids Ent Clinic, Tokyo, Japan. 12 Wada Pediatric Clinic, Tokyo, Japan. 13 Division of Infectious Diseases, Advanced Clinical Research Center, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. 14 Department of Infectious Diseases and Applied Immunology, IMSUT Hospital of the Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. 15 Nezu Clinic, Tokyo, Japan. 16 Influenza Virus Research Center, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan. 17 Division of Virology, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. yoshihiro.kawaoka@wisc.edu. 18 Influenza Research Institute, Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA. yoshihiro.kawaoka@wisc.edu. 19 Department of Special Pathogens, International Research Center for Infectious Diseases, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan. yoshihiro.kawaoka@wisc.edu.

 

Abstract

Here we report the isolation of the influenza A/H1N1 2009 pandemic (A/H1N1pdm) and A/H3N2 viruses carrying an I38T mutation in the polymerase acidic protein-a mutation that confers reduced susceptibility to baloxavir marboxil-from patients before and after treatment with baloxavir marboxil in Japan. These variants showed replicative abilities and pathogenicity that is similar to those of wild-type isolates in hamsters; they also transmitted efficiently between ferrets by respiratory droplets.

PMID: 31768027 DOI: 10.1038/s41564-019-0609-0

Keywords: Antivirals; Drugs Resistance; H1N1pdm09; H3N2; Seasonal Influenza; Japan.

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