High #prevalence of #SARS‐CoV‐2 and #influenza A virus (#H1N1) #coinfection in dead patients in Northeastern #Iran (J Med Virol., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Medical Virology, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

High prevalence of SARS‐CoV‐2 and influenza A virus (H1N1) co‐infection in dead patients in Northeastern Iran

Seyed Ahmad Hashemi MD,  Saghar Safamanesh MSc,  Hamed Ghasem Zadeh‐moghaddam,  Majid Ghafouri MD,  Azimian Amir PhD

First published: 28 July 2020 | DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.26364

This article has been accepted for publication and undergone full peer review but has not been through the copyediting, typesetting, pagination and proofreading process, which may lead to differences between this version and the Version of Record. Please cite this article as doi: 10.1002/jmv.26364

 

Abstract

In the last months of 2019, an outbreak of fatal respiratory disease started in Wuhan, China, and quickly spread to other parts of the world. It named COVID‐19, and to date, thousands of cases of infection and death reported worldwide. The disease is associated with a wide range of symptoms that make it difficult to diagnose it accurately. The previous SARS pandemic in 2003, researchers found that the patients with fever, cough, or sore throat had a 5% influenza virus‐positive rate. This finding sparked in our minds that the wide range of symptoms and also relatively high prevalence of death in our patients may be due to the co‐infection with other viruses. Thus, we evaluate the co‐infection of SARS‐CoV‐2 with other respiratory viruses in dead patients in North Khorasan. We evaluated the presence of influenza A/B virus, Human metapneumovirus, bocavirus, adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and parainfluenza viruses in 105 SARS‐CoV‐2 positive dead patients, using PCR and RT‐PCR tests. We found co‐infection with influenza virus in 22.3%, respiratory syncytial virus, and bocavirus in 9.7%, parainfluenza viruses in 3.9%, Human metapneumovirus in 2.9% and finally adenovirus in 1.9% of SARS‐CoV‐2 positive dead cases.

The highlights of our findings are a high prevalence of co‐infection with influenza A virus and the monopoly of co‐infection with Human metapneumovirus in children.

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Seasonal Influenza; H1N1pdm09; Metapneumovirus; Iran.

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#Characteristics and #Mortality of Hospitalized Patients With #COVID19 in #Iran: A National Retrospective Cohort Study (Ann Intern Med., summary)

[Source: Annals of Internal Medicine, full page: (LINK). Summary, edited.]

Characteristics and Mortality of Hospitalized Patients With COVID-19 in Iran: A National Retrospective Cohort Study

Mohammad Jalili, MD, Pooya Payandemehr, MD, Abbas Saghaei, MD, Hassan Nouri Sari, MD, Hamidreza Safikhani, MD, Pirhossein Kolivand, PhD

DOI: https://doi.org/10.7326/M20-2911

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Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a serious health care concern in Iran, with 259 652 confirmed cases since the first report on 18 February 2020, and Iran has the ninth highest national death toll in the world, with more than 13 000 deaths (1). Despite the immensity of the problem, there are limited data available about the characteristics and mortality of hospitalized patients in Iran.

(…)

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Iran.

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Double trouble: #methanol #outbreak in the wake of the #COVID19 pandemic in #Iran—a cross-sectional assessment (Crit Care, summary)

[Source: Critical Care, full page: (LINK). Summary, edited.]

Double trouble: methanol outbreak in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic in Iran—a cross-sectional assessment

Hossein Hassanian-Moghaddam, Nasim Zamani, Ali-Asghar Kolahi, Rebecca McDonald & Knut Erik Hovda

Critical Care volume 24, Article number: 402 (2020)

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Iran has been the epicenter of COVID-19 in the Middle East, with a total of 120,198 infected cases and 8556 deaths as of June 10 [1]. The pandemic has been complicated by the co-occurrence of a large methanol outbreak in Iran, seemingly triggered by false claims that consumption of disinfectants and alcohols could prevent and treat COVID-19 infection. According to local news, the ensuing rise in ethanol demand made bootleggers decolorate industrial alcohols containing pyridine (to deter from consumption) using bleach, before selling them as regular ethanol to Iranians.

(…)

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Society; Toxic chemicals; Iran.

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#Epidemic #curve and #reproduction number of #COVID19 in #Iran (J Trav Med., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Travel Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Epidemic curve and reproduction number of COVID-19 in Iran

Ebrahim Sahafizadeh, PhD, Samaneh Sartoli, BA

Journal of Travel Medicine, taaa077, https://doi.org/10.1093/jtm/taaa077

Published: 18 May 2020

 

ighlight

COVID-19 was first reported in Iran on 19 February, 2020. We estimated the initial basic reproduction number to be 4.86. With increasingly stringent public health measures, the effective reproduction number declined to below 1 after 2 months.

SARS-CoV-2, nonpharmaceutical interventions, isolation, quarantine, mitigation, public health emergency of international concern, pandemic

Topic:  iran  – quarantine – reproductive physiological process – public health medicine – pandemics – epidemic curve – sars-cov-2  – covid-19

Issue Section: Research letter

This content is only available as a PDF.

© International Society of Travel Medicine 2020. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model)

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Iran.

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Large saddle #pulmonary #embolism in a woman infected by #COVID19 pneumonia (Eur Heart J., summary)

[Source: European Heart Journal, full page: (LINK). Summary, edited.]

Large saddle pulmonary embolism in a woman infected by COVID-19 pneumonia

Ramezan Jafari, Luca Cegolon, Atefeh Jafari, Mandana Kashaki, Babak Otoukesh, Bahareh Heshmat Ghahderijani, Morteza Izadi, Seyed Hassan Saadat, Behzad Einollahi, Mohammad Javanbakht

European Heart Journal, ehaa402, https://doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehaa402

Published: 06 May 2020

Issue Section: CARDIOVASCULAR FLASHLIGHT

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A 50-year-old woman was admitted to the Accident & Emergency department of Baqiyatallah hospital in Tehran (Iran), with symptoms of fever, dyspnoea, dry cough, and fatigue for the past 4 days.

(…)

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Coagulopathy.

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#Maternal #Death Due to #COVID19 Disease (Am J Obstet Gynecol., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2020 Apr 28;S0002-9378(20)30516-0.  doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2020.04.030. Online ahead of print.

Maternal Death Due to COVID-19 Disease

Sedigheh Hantoushzadeh 1, Alireza A Shamshirsaz 2, Ashraf Aleyasin 3, Maxim D Seferovic 4, Soudabeh Kazemi Aski 5, Sara E Arian 6, Parichehr Pooransari 7, Fahimeh Ghotbizadeh 1, Soroush Aalipour 8, Zahra Soleimani 9, Mahsa Naemi 3, Behnaz Molaei 10, Roghaye Ahangari 11, Mohammadreza Salehi 12, Atousa Dabiri Oskoei 10, Parisa Pirozan 11, Roya Faraji Darkhaneh 5, Mahboobeh Gharib Laki 10, Ali Karimi Farani 11, Shahla Atrak 10, Mir Mohammad Miri 13, Mehran Kouchek 13, Seyedpouzhia Shojaei 13, Fahimeh Hadavand 14, Fatemeh Keikha 1, Maryam Sadat Hosseini 15, Sedigheh Borna 5, Shideh Ariana 7, Mamak Shariat 1, Alireza Fatemi 13, Behnaz Nouri 7, Seyed Mojtaba Nekooghadam 15, Kjersti Aagaard 16

Affiliations: 1 Maternal Fetal Neonatal Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. 2 Maternal Fetal Neonatal Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX; Department of Surgery, Division of Fetal Therapy and Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.  3 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. 4 Departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX. 5 Reproductive Health Research Center, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Rasht, Iran. 6 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX.  7 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. 8 Departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX; Department of Surgery, Division of Fetal Therapy and Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX.  9 Nephrology and Urology research center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. 10 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan, Iran. 11 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Qom University of Medical Science, Qom, Iran. 12 Department of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicines, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. 13 Men’s Health and Reproductive Health Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. 14 Department of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicines, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. 15 Department of Internal Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. 16 Departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX; Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX; National School of Tropical Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX. Electronic address: aagaardt@bcm.edu.

PMID: 32360108  DOI: 10.1016/j.ajog.2020.04.030

 

Abstract

Background:

Despite 2.5 million infections and 169,000 deaths worldwide (current as of April 20, 2020), no maternal deaths and only a few pregnant women afflicted with severe respiratory morbidity had been reported to be related to COVID-19 disease. Given the disproportionate burden of severe and mortal respiratory disease previously documented among pregnant women following other related coronavirus outbreaks (SARS-CoV in 2003 and MERS-CoV) and influenza pandemics over the last century, the absence of reported maternal morbidity and mortality with COVID-19 disease is unexpected.

Objectives:

To describe maternal and perinatal outcomes and death in a case series of pregnant women with COVID-19 disease.

Study design:

We describe here a multi-institution adjudicated case series from Iran which includes 9 pregnant women diagnosed with severe COVID-19 disease during their latter 2nd or 3rd trimester. All 9 pregnant women were diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 infection by rRT-PCR nucleic acid testing (NAT). Outcomes of these women were compared to their familial/household members with exposure to the affected patient on or after their symptom onset. All data were reported at death or after a minimum of 14 days from date of admission with COVID-19 disease.

Results:

Among 9 pregnant women with severe COVID-19 disease, at the time of reporting 7 of 9 died, 1 of 9 remains critically ill and ventilator-dependent, and 1 of 9 recovered after prolonged hospitalization. We obtained self-verified familial/household cohort data in all 9 cases, and in each and every instance the maternal outcomes were more severe when compared to other high and low-risk familial/household members (n=33 members for comparison).

Conclusion:

We report herein maternal deaths due to COVID-19 disease. Until rigorously collected surveillance data emerges, it is prudent to be aware of the potential for maternal death among pregnant women diagnosed with COVID-19 disease in their latter trimester(s).

Keywords: COVID-19 disease; Maternal death; SARS CoV-2 virus; coronavirus disease in pregnancy; lower respiratory infections in pregnancy; maternal mortality; maternal respiratory morbidity; pregnancy; respiratory failure with COVID-19.

Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Iran; Pregnancy.

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A #Patient With #COVID19 Disease in a Referral #Hospital in #Iran: A Typical Case (Infect Disord Drug Targets, abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Infect Disord Drug Targets. 2020 Apr 29. doi: 10.2174/1871526520666200429115535. Online ahead of print.

A Patient With COVID-19 Disease in a Referral Hospital in Iran: A Typical Case

Fereshteh Ghiasvand 1, Sepideh Zahak Miandoab 2, Hamid Harandi 3, Fereshteh Shahmari Golestan 4, Seyed Ahmad Seyed Alinaghi 3

Affiliations: 1 Liver Transplantation Research Center, Department of Infectious Diseases, Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran. Iran. 2 Department of Infectious Diseases, Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran. Iran. 3 Iranian Research Center for HIV/AIDS, Iranian Institute for Reduction of High Risk Behaviors, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran. Iran. 4 Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran. Iran.

PMID: 32348232 DOI: 10.2174/1871526520666200429115535

 

Abstract

After the initial Wuhan outbreak in the end of December 2019, many new cases were found in other provinces of China and also many other countries over the world, including South Korea, Italy, Iran, Japan, and 68 other countries. We presented a 61-year-old woman with a history of diabetes mellitus was referred to the emergency department of a referral hospital in Tehran, Iran. The patient presented with fever, chills, and myalgia within three days. Laboratory analysis showed increased levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and mild leukopenia. SARSCoV-2 PCR test -under Iran Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MoH&ME) guidelines – result was positive and the chest X-ray shows bilateral ground glass opacity. O2 saturation was 87% (without O2 therapy). The patient was hospitalized and treated with Oseltamivir 75 mg every 12 hours, Lopinavir/Ritonavir (Kaletra) 400/100 mg every 12 hours and hydroxychloroquine 400 mg stat. The patient last O2 saturation measured was 93% and had no fever in the 10th day of hospitalization. So she has been discharged from hospital and homeisolated according to Iran Ministry of Health protocol.

Keywords: COVID-19; Coronavirus; Diabetes mellitus; Ground glass Opacity; SARS-CoV-2 PCR test; severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2.

Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.net.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Iran; Antivirals; Oseltamivir; Lopinavir; Ritonavir; Chloroquine; Diabetes.

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#SARS-CoV-2 #Transmission #Potential, #Iran, 2020 (Emerg Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Volume 26, Number 8—August 2020 | Research Letter

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 Transmission Potential, Iran, 2020

Kamalich Muniz-Rodriguez1, Isaac Chun-Hai Fung1  , Shayesteh R. Ferdosi, Sylvia K. Ofori, Yiseul Lee, Amna Tariq, and Gerardo Chowell

Author affiliations: Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, Georgia, USA (K. Muniz-Rodriguez, I.C.-H. Fung, S.K. Ofori); The Translational Genomics Research Institute, Phoenix, Arizona, USA (S.R. Ferdosi); Georgia State University School of Public Health, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (Y. Lee, A. Tariq, G. Chowell)

 

Abstract

To determine the transmission potential of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 in Iran in 2020, we estimated the reproduction number as 4.4 (95% CI 3.9–4.9) by using a generalized growth model and 3.5 (95% CI 1.3–8.1) by using epidemic doubling time. The reproduction number decreased to 1.55 after social distancing interventions were implemented.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Iran.

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#Epidemiological Characteristics of #Coronavirus Disease 2019 (#COVID19) Patients in #IRAN: A single Center Study (J Clin Virol., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Clinical Virology, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Journal of Clinical Virology | Available online 21 April 2020, 104378 | In Press, Journal Pre-proof

Epidemiological Characteristics of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Patients in IRAN: A single Center Study

Mohamad Nikpouraghdam a, Alireza Jalali Farahani b, Gholam Hossein Alishiri c, Soleyman Heydari d, Mehdi Ebrahimni a,e, Hossein Samadini a, f, Mojtaba Sepandi g, Nematollah Jonaidi Jafari g, Morteza Izadi Izadi g, Ali Qazvini d, Ruhollah Dorostkar h, Mahdi Tat h, Alireza Shahriary c, Gholamreza Farnoosh i, Seyed Reza Hosseini Zijoud b, Maryam Taghdir g, Yousef Alimohamadij Sepide Abbaszadeh g, Hadi Esmaeili Gouvarchin Ghaleh Mahdi Bagheri k

a Nephrology and Urology Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; b Atherosclerosis Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; c Chemical Injuries Research Center, Systems biology and poisonings institute, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; d Trauma Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; e Health Management Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; f Nanobiotechnology Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; g Health Research Center, Life style institute, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; h Applied Virology Research Center, Baqiyatallah university of medical sciences, Tehran, Iran; i Applied Biotechnology Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; j Pars Advanced and Minimally Invasive Medical Manners Research Center, Pars Hospital, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; k Student Research Committee, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Received 16 April 2020, Accepted 19 April 2020, Available online 21 April 2020.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2020.104378

 

Highlights

  • The majority of cases were in the age group of 50 to 60 years of old.
  • A total of 2964 cases of COVID-19 were investigated.
  • The male-to-female ratio was 1.93:1.
  • A significant effect of age, gender and comorbidities on the mortality.
  • The Case Fatality Rate among understudy cases was 8.06%.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Iran.

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Preliminary #estimation of the novel #coronavirus disease (#COVID19) cases in #Iran: A modelling analysis based on overseas cases and air travel data (Int J Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

International Journal of Infectious Diseases | Volume 94, May 2020, Pages 29-31 | Short Communication

Preliminary estimation of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) cases in Iran: A modelling analysis based on overseas cases and air travel data

Zian Zhuang a, Shi Zhao b,c, Qianying Lin d, Peihua Cao e, Yijun Lou a, Lin Yang f, Daihai He a

a Department of Applied Mathematics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR, China; b JC School of Public Health and Primary Care, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China; c Shenzhen Research Institute of Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen, China; d Michigan Institute for Data Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; e Clinical Research Centre, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China; f School of Nursing, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR, China

Received 1 March 2020, Revised 4 March 2020, Accepted 5 March 2020, Available online 14 April 2020.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2020.03.019

 

Highlights

  • As of March 1, 2020, Iran had reported 987 COVID-19 cases, including 54 associated deaths.
  • At least six neighboring countries (Bahrain, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, Afghanistan, and Pakistan) had reported imported COVID-19 cases from Iran.
  • We estimated that 16 533 (95% confidence interval 5925–35 538) COVID-19 cases had occurred in Iran by February 25, 2020.
  • Iran’s ascertainment rate could have been at a level of 0.6% on February 25, 2020.

 

Abstract

As of March 1, 2020, Iran had reported 987 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) cases, including 54 associated deaths. At least six neighboring countries (Bahrain, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, Afghanistan, and Pakistan) had reported imported COVID-19 cases from Iran. In this study, air travel data and the numbers of cases from Iran imported into other Middle Eastern countries were used to estimate the number of COVID-19 cases in Iran. It was estimated that the total number of cases in Iran was 16 533 (95% confidence interval: 5925–35 538) by February 25, 2020, before the UAE and other Gulf Cooperation Council countries suspended inbound and outbound flights from Iran.

Keywords: SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Iran.

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