#History of #arbovirus #infections in French #Polynesia (New Microbes New Infect., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

New Microbes New Infect. 2019 Feb 8;29:100513. doi: 10.1016/j.nmni.2019.01.009. eCollection 2019 May.

History of arthropod-borne virus infections in French Polynesia.

Aubry M1, Cao-Lormeau VM1.

Author information: 1 Institut Louis Malardé, Tahiti, French Polynesia.

 

Abstract

In French Polynesia, arthropod-borne diseases are major public health problems. From the mid-1940s, the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV-1 to -4) have caused 15 epidemics of variable severity. In 2013, for the first time, a sustained co-circulation of two different DENV serotypes (DENV-1 and -3) was reported. The same year, Zika virus (ZIKV) caused the largest outbreak ever recorded at that time. Severe neurologic complications in adults, including Guillain-Barré syndrome and central nervous system malformations in newborns and foeteuses, such as microcephaly, were reported, and a causal link with ZIKV infection was established. In addition to mosquito-borne transmission, the potential for perinatal, sexual and blood-transfusion transmission of ZIKV was demonstrated. In 2014, chikungunya virus (CHIKV) caused an explosive outbreak. Series of Guillain-Barré syndrome temporally associated with the CHIKV epidemic were reported. Except for DENV, ZIKV and CHIKV, no other arboviruses have been detected so far, but serologic evidence suggested the past silent circulation of Ross River virus. From May 2015 DENV-1 has been the only arbovirus transmitted in French Polynesia, but the reemergence of DENV-2 is highly expected since the detection of two autochthonous cases of DENV-2 infection in June 2018.

KEYWORDS: Arbovirus; French Polynesia; Pacific; Ross River; Zika; chikungunya; dengue

PMID: 30899520 PMCID: PMC6407142 DOI: 10.1016/j.nmni.2019.01.009

Keywords: Arbovirus; Dengue fever; Zika virus; Chikungunya fever; Ross River Virus; French Polynesia.

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#Zika Virus #Infection during #Pregnancy and Early #Childhood #Development, French #Polynesia, 2013–2016 (Emerg Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Volume 24, Number 10—October 2018 / Research

Zika Virus Infection during Pregnancy and Early Childhood Development, French Polynesia, 2013–2016

Lorenzo Subissi, Timothée Dub, Marianne Besnard, Teheipuaura Mariteragi-Helle, Tuxuan Nhan, Delphine Lutringer-Magnin, Philippe Barboza, Céline Gurry, Pauline Brindel, Eric J. Nilles, David Baud, Angela Merianos, Didier Musso, Judith R. Glynn, Gilles Dupuis, Van-Mai Cao-Lormeau1, Marine Giard1  , and Henri-Pierre Mallet1

Author affiliations: World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland (L. Subissi, P. Barboza, C. Gurry, P. Brindel); Institut Pasteur, Paris, France (T. Dub); French Polynesia Hospital Center, Pirae, French Polynesia (M. Besnard, D. Lutringer-Magnin); Institut Louis Malardé, Papeete, French Polynesia (T. Mariteragi-Helle, T. Nhan, D. Musso, V.-M. Cao-Lormeau); Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, Boston, Massachusetts, USA (E.J. Nilles); World Health Organization, Manila, Philippines (E.J. Nilles, A. Merianos); University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland (D. Baud); Aix Marseille University, Marseille, France (D. Musso); London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK (J.R. Glynn); University of Québec, Montreal, Québec, Canada (G. Dupuis); Centre de Liaison sur l’Intervention et la Prévention Psychosociales, Montreal (G. Dupuis); Bureau de Veille Sanitaire, Direction de la Santé, Papeete (M. Giard, H.-P. Mallet)

 

Abstract

Congenital Zika virus syndrome consists of a large spectrum of neurologic abnormalities seen in infants infected with Zika virus in utero. However, little is unknown about the effects of Zika virus intrauterine infection on the neurocognitive development of children born without birth defects. Using a case-control study design, we investigated the temporal association of a cluster of congenital defects with Zika virus infection. In a nested study, we also assessed the early childhood development of children recruited in the initial study as controls who were born without known birth defects,. We found evidence for an association of congenital defects with both maternal Zika virus seropositivity (time of infection unknown) and symptomatic Zika virus infection during pregnancy. Although the early childhood development assessment found no excess burden of developmental delay associated with maternal Zika virus infection, larger, longer-term studies are needed.

Keywords: Zika Virus; Zika Congenital Infection; Pregnancy; French Polynesia.

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#ICU #Admissions for Severe #Chikungunya Virus #Infection, French #Polynesia (Emerg Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Volume 24, Number 4—April 2018 / Research Letter

Intensive Care Admissions for Severe Chikungunya Virus Infection, French Polynesia

Adrien Koeltz  , Stephane Lastere, and Sylvain Jean-Baptiste

Author affiliations: Taaone Hospital, Papeete, French Polynesia (A. Koeltz, S. Lastere); Bichat Hospital, Paris, France (S. Jean-Baptiste)

 

Abstract

During the 2014–2015 chikungunya outbreak in French Polynesia, 64 patients with confirmed chikungunya virus infection were admitted into intensive care. Sixty-three were nonpregnant adults; 11 had an atypical form, 21 had severe sepsis or septic shock, and 18 died. These findings indicate that critical illness frequently complicates the course of chikungunya virus infection.

Keywords: Chikungunya Fever; French Polynesia.

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#Zika virus in French #Polynesia 2013–14: #anatomy of a completed #outbreak (Lancet Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Zika virus in French Polynesia 2013–14: anatomy of a completed outbreak

Dr Didier Musso, MD,Hervé Bossin, PhD,Henri Pierre Mallet, MD ,Marianne Besnard, MD,Julien Broult, MD,Laure Baudouin, MD,José Eduardo Levi, PhD,Ester C Sabino, MD,Frederic Ghawche, MD,Marion C Lanteri, PhD,Prof David Baud, MD

Published: 14 November 2017 / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(17)30446-2

Publication HistoryPublished: 14 November 2017

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

 

Summary

The Zika virus crisis exemplified the risk associated with emerging pathogens and was a reminder that preparedness for the worst-case scenario, although challenging, is needed. Herein, we review all data reported during the unexpected emergence of Zika virus in French Polynesia in late 2013. We focus on the new findings reported during this outbreak, especially the first description of severe neurological complications in adults and the retrospective description of CNS malformations in neonates, the isolation of Zika virus in semen, the potential for blood-transfusion transmission, mother-to-child transmission, and the development of new diagnostic assays. We describe the effect of this outbreak on health systems, the implementation of vector-borne control strategies, and the line of communication used to alert the international community of the new risk associated with Zika virus. This outbreak highlighted the need for careful monitoring of all unexpected events that occur during an emergence, to implement surveillance and research programmes in parallel to management of cases, and to be prepared to the worst-case scenario.

Keywords: Zika Virus; French Polynesia.

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#RossRiver Virus #Seroprevalence, French #Polynesia, 2014–2015 (@CDC_EIDjournal, abstract)

[Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Volume 23, Number 10—October 2017 / Research Letter

Ross River Virus Seroprevalence, French Polynesia, 2014–2015

Maite Aubry  , Anita Teissier, Michael Huart, Sébastien Merceron, Jessica Vanhomwegen, Claudine Roche, Anne-Laure Vial, Sylvianne Teururai, Sébastien Sicard, Sylvie Paulous, Philippe Desprès, Jean-Claude Manuguerra, Henri-Pierre Mallet, Didier Musso, Xavier Deparis, and Van-Mai Cao-Lormeau

Author affiliations: Institut Louis Malardé, Tahiti, French Polynesia (M. Aubry, A. Teissier, C. Roche, S. Teururai, D. Musso, V.-M. Cao-Lormeau); Centre d’épidémiologie et de santé publique des armées, Marseille, France; and Unité Mixte de Recherche Sciences Economiques et Sociales de la Santé et Traitement de l’Information Médicale, Marseille (M. Huart, S. Sicard, X. Deparis); Institut de la statistique de la Polynésie française, Tahiti; and Institut national de la statistique et des études économiques, Sainte Clotilde, Réunion (S. Merceron); Institut Pasteur, Paris, France (J. Vanhomwegen, S. Paulous, J.-C. Manuguerra); Direction Départementale de la Cohésion Sociale et de la Protection des Populations, Yonne, France (A.-L. Vial); Direction de la Santé de la Polynésie française, Tahiti (A.-L. Vial, H.-P. Mallet); Université de La Réunion, Sainte Clotilde, France ; and Unité Mixte de Recherche Processus Infectieux en Milieu Insulaire Tropical, Sainte Clotilde, France (P. Desprès)

 

Abstract

Ross River virus (RRV), spread by Aedes and Culex mosquitoes, is the most commonly transmitted arbovirus in Australia. A serosurvey of blood donors in French Polynesia during 2011–2013 suggested that RRV circulated without being detected. We report RRV circulation in French Polynesia based on further screening of blood samples collected during 2014–2015.

Keywords: Arbovirus; Mosquitoes; Culex spp.; Aedes spp.; French Polynesia; Ross River Virus.

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#Outcomes for 2 #Children after Peripartum Acquisition of #Zika Virus #Infection, French #Polynesia, 2013–2014 (@CDC_EIDjournal, abstract)

[Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Volume 23, Number 8—August 2017 / Research Letter

Outcomes for 2 Children after Peripartum Acquisition of Zika Virus Infection, French Polynesia, 2013–2014

Marianne Besnard, Timothée Dub, and Patrick Gérardin

Author affiliations: Centre Hospitalier de Polynésie Française, Pirae, Tahiti (M. Besnard); Institut Pasteur, Paris, France (T. Dub); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Saint Pierre, Réunion (P. Gérardin)

 

Abstract

Congenital Zika virus infection is associated with severe brain anomalies and impaired function. To determine outcomes, we followed 2 affected children for ≈30 months. For 1 who was symptomatic at birth, transient hepatitis developed. However, neurodevelopment for both children was age appropriate.

Keywords: Zika Virus; Zika Congenital Syndrome; French Polynesia.

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#Zika Virus #Seroprevalence, French #Polynesia, 2014–2015 (@CDC_EIDjournal, abstract)

[Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Volume 23, Number 4—April 2017 / Dispatch

Zika Virus Seroprevalence, French Polynesia, 2014–2015

Maite Aubry, Anita Teissier, Michael Huart, Sébastien Merceron, Jessica Vanhomwegen, Claudine Roche, Anne-Laure Vial, Sylvianne Teururai, Sébastien Sicard, Sylvie Paulous, Philippe Desprès, Jean-Claude Manuguerra, Henri-Pierre Mallet, Didier Musso, Xavier Deparis, and Van-Mai Cao-Lormeau

Author affiliations: Institut Louis Malardé, Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia (M. Aubry, A. Teissier, C. Roche, S. Teururai, D. Musso, V.-M. Cao-Lormeau); Centre d’Épidémiologie et de Santé Publique des Armées, Marseille, France (M. Huart, S. Sicard, X. Deparis); Unité Mixte de Recherche Sciences Economiques et Sociales de la Santé et Traitement de l’Information Médicale, Marseille (M. Huart, S. Sicard, X. Deparis); Institut de la Statistique de la Polynésie Française, Papeete (S. Merceron); Institut Pasteur, Paris, France (J. Vanhomwegen, S. Paulous, J.-C. Manuguerra); Direction Départementale de la Cohésion Sociale et de la Protection des Populations, Yonne, France (A.-L. Vial); Direction de la Santé de la Polynésie Française, Papeete (A.-L. Vial, H.-P. Mallet); Université de La Réunion, Sainte Clotilde, France (P. Desprès)

 

Abstract

During 2013–2014, French Polynesia experienced an outbreak of Zika virus infection. Serosurveys conducted at the end of the outbreak and 18 months later showed lower than expected disease prevalence rates (49%) and asymptomatic:symptomatic case ratios (1:1) in the general population but significantly different prevalence rates (66%) and asymptomatic:symptomatic ratios (1:2) in schoolchildren.

Keywords: Zika Virus; Seroprevalence; French Polynesia.

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