#History of #arbovirus #infections in French #Polynesia (New Microbes New Infect., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

New Microbes New Infect. 2019 Feb 8;29:100513. doi: 10.1016/j.nmni.2019.01.009. eCollection 2019 May.

History of arthropod-borne virus infections in French Polynesia.

Aubry M1, Cao-Lormeau VM1.

Author information: 1 Institut Louis Malardé, Tahiti, French Polynesia.

 

Abstract

In French Polynesia, arthropod-borne diseases are major public health problems. From the mid-1940s, the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV-1 to -4) have caused 15 epidemics of variable severity. In 2013, for the first time, a sustained co-circulation of two different DENV serotypes (DENV-1 and -3) was reported. The same year, Zika virus (ZIKV) caused the largest outbreak ever recorded at that time. Severe neurologic complications in adults, including Guillain-Barré syndrome and central nervous system malformations in newborns and foeteuses, such as microcephaly, were reported, and a causal link with ZIKV infection was established. In addition to mosquito-borne transmission, the potential for perinatal, sexual and blood-transfusion transmission of ZIKV was demonstrated. In 2014, chikungunya virus (CHIKV) caused an explosive outbreak. Series of Guillain-Barré syndrome temporally associated with the CHIKV epidemic were reported. Except for DENV, ZIKV and CHIKV, no other arboviruses have been detected so far, but serologic evidence suggested the past silent circulation of Ross River virus. From May 2015 DENV-1 has been the only arbovirus transmitted in French Polynesia, but the reemergence of DENV-2 is highly expected since the detection of two autochthonous cases of DENV-2 infection in June 2018.

KEYWORDS: Arbovirus; French Polynesia; Pacific; Ross River; Zika; chikungunya; dengue

PMID: 30899520 PMCID: PMC6407142 DOI: 10.1016/j.nmni.2019.01.009

Keywords: Arbovirus; Dengue fever; Zika virus; Chikungunya fever; Ross River Virus; French Polynesia.

——

#Zika Virus #Infection during #Pregnancy and Early #Childhood #Development, French #Polynesia, 2013–2016 (Emerg Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Volume 24, Number 10—October 2018 / Research

Zika Virus Infection during Pregnancy and Early Childhood Development, French Polynesia, 2013–2016

Lorenzo Subissi, Timothée Dub, Marianne Besnard, Teheipuaura Mariteragi-Helle, Tuxuan Nhan, Delphine Lutringer-Magnin, Philippe Barboza, Céline Gurry, Pauline Brindel, Eric J. Nilles, David Baud, Angela Merianos, Didier Musso, Judith R. Glynn, Gilles Dupuis, Van-Mai Cao-Lormeau1, Marine Giard1  , and Henri-Pierre Mallet1

Author affiliations: World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland (L. Subissi, P. Barboza, C. Gurry, P. Brindel); Institut Pasteur, Paris, France (T. Dub); French Polynesia Hospital Center, Pirae, French Polynesia (M. Besnard, D. Lutringer-Magnin); Institut Louis Malardé, Papeete, French Polynesia (T. Mariteragi-Helle, T. Nhan, D. Musso, V.-M. Cao-Lormeau); Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, Boston, Massachusetts, USA (E.J. Nilles); World Health Organization, Manila, Philippines (E.J. Nilles, A. Merianos); University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland (D. Baud); Aix Marseille University, Marseille, France (D. Musso); London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK (J.R. Glynn); University of Québec, Montreal, Québec, Canada (G. Dupuis); Centre de Liaison sur l’Intervention et la Prévention Psychosociales, Montreal (G. Dupuis); Bureau de Veille Sanitaire, Direction de la Santé, Papeete (M. Giard, H.-P. Mallet)

 

Abstract

Congenital Zika virus syndrome consists of a large spectrum of neurologic abnormalities seen in infants infected with Zika virus in utero. However, little is unknown about the effects of Zika virus intrauterine infection on the neurocognitive development of children born without birth defects. Using a case-control study design, we investigated the temporal association of a cluster of congenital defects with Zika virus infection. In a nested study, we also assessed the early childhood development of children recruited in the initial study as controls who were born without known birth defects,. We found evidence for an association of congenital defects with both maternal Zika virus seropositivity (time of infection unknown) and symptomatic Zika virus infection during pregnancy. Although the early childhood development assessment found no excess burden of developmental delay associated with maternal Zika virus infection, larger, longer-term studies are needed.

Keywords: Zika Virus; Zika Congenital Infection; Pregnancy; French Polynesia.

——

#ICU #Admissions for Severe #Chikungunya Virus #Infection, French #Polynesia (Emerg Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Volume 24, Number 4—April 2018 / Research Letter

Intensive Care Admissions for Severe Chikungunya Virus Infection, French Polynesia

Adrien Koeltz  , Stephane Lastere, and Sylvain Jean-Baptiste

Author affiliations: Taaone Hospital, Papeete, French Polynesia (A. Koeltz, S. Lastere); Bichat Hospital, Paris, France (S. Jean-Baptiste)

 

Abstract

During the 2014–2015 chikungunya outbreak in French Polynesia, 64 patients with confirmed chikungunya virus infection were admitted into intensive care. Sixty-three were nonpregnant adults; 11 had an atypical form, 21 had severe sepsis or septic shock, and 18 died. These findings indicate that critical illness frequently complicates the course of chikungunya virus infection.

Keywords: Chikungunya Fever; French Polynesia.

——

#Zika virus in French #Polynesia 2013–14: #anatomy of a completed #outbreak (Lancet Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Zika virus in French Polynesia 2013–14: anatomy of a completed outbreak

Dr Didier Musso, MD,Hervé Bossin, PhD,Henri Pierre Mallet, MD ,Marianne Besnard, MD,Julien Broult, MD,Laure Baudouin, MD,José Eduardo Levi, PhD,Ester C Sabino, MD,Frederic Ghawche, MD,Marion C Lanteri, PhD,Prof David Baud, MD

Published: 14 November 2017 / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(17)30446-2

Publication HistoryPublished: 14 November 2017

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

 

Summary

The Zika virus crisis exemplified the risk associated with emerging pathogens and was a reminder that preparedness for the worst-case scenario, although challenging, is needed. Herein, we review all data reported during the unexpected emergence of Zika virus in French Polynesia in late 2013. We focus on the new findings reported during this outbreak, especially the first description of severe neurological complications in adults and the retrospective description of CNS malformations in neonates, the isolation of Zika virus in semen, the potential for blood-transfusion transmission, mother-to-child transmission, and the development of new diagnostic assays. We describe the effect of this outbreak on health systems, the implementation of vector-borne control strategies, and the line of communication used to alert the international community of the new risk associated with Zika virus. This outbreak highlighted the need for careful monitoring of all unexpected events that occur during an emergence, to implement surveillance and research programmes in parallel to management of cases, and to be prepared to the worst-case scenario.

Keywords: Zika Virus; French Polynesia.

——

#RossRiver Virus #Seroprevalence, French #Polynesia, 2014–2015 (@CDC_EIDjournal, abstract)

[Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Volume 23, Number 10—October 2017 / Research Letter

Ross River Virus Seroprevalence, French Polynesia, 2014–2015

Maite Aubry  , Anita Teissier, Michael Huart, Sébastien Merceron, Jessica Vanhomwegen, Claudine Roche, Anne-Laure Vial, Sylvianne Teururai, Sébastien Sicard, Sylvie Paulous, Philippe Desprès, Jean-Claude Manuguerra, Henri-Pierre Mallet, Didier Musso, Xavier Deparis, and Van-Mai Cao-Lormeau

Author affiliations: Institut Louis Malardé, Tahiti, French Polynesia (M. Aubry, A. Teissier, C. Roche, S. Teururai, D. Musso, V.-M. Cao-Lormeau); Centre d’épidémiologie et de santé publique des armées, Marseille, France; and Unité Mixte de Recherche Sciences Economiques et Sociales de la Santé et Traitement de l’Information Médicale, Marseille (M. Huart, S. Sicard, X. Deparis); Institut de la statistique de la Polynésie française, Tahiti; and Institut national de la statistique et des études économiques, Sainte Clotilde, Réunion (S. Merceron); Institut Pasteur, Paris, France (J. Vanhomwegen, S. Paulous, J.-C. Manuguerra); Direction Départementale de la Cohésion Sociale et de la Protection des Populations, Yonne, France (A.-L. Vial); Direction de la Santé de la Polynésie française, Tahiti (A.-L. Vial, H.-P. Mallet); Université de La Réunion, Sainte Clotilde, France ; and Unité Mixte de Recherche Processus Infectieux en Milieu Insulaire Tropical, Sainte Clotilde, France (P. Desprès)

 

Abstract

Ross River virus (RRV), spread by Aedes and Culex mosquitoes, is the most commonly transmitted arbovirus in Australia. A serosurvey of blood donors in French Polynesia during 2011–2013 suggested that RRV circulated without being detected. We report RRV circulation in French Polynesia based on further screening of blood samples collected during 2014–2015.

Keywords: Arbovirus; Mosquitoes; Culex spp.; Aedes spp.; French Polynesia; Ross River Virus.

——-

#Outcomes for 2 #Children after Peripartum Acquisition of #Zika Virus #Infection, French #Polynesia, 2013–2014 (@CDC_EIDjournal, abstract)

[Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Volume 23, Number 8—August 2017 / Research Letter

Outcomes for 2 Children after Peripartum Acquisition of Zika Virus Infection, French Polynesia, 2013–2014

Marianne Besnard, Timothée Dub, and Patrick Gérardin

Author affiliations: Centre Hospitalier de Polynésie Française, Pirae, Tahiti (M. Besnard); Institut Pasteur, Paris, France (T. Dub); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Saint Pierre, Réunion (P. Gérardin)

 

Abstract

Congenital Zika virus infection is associated with severe brain anomalies and impaired function. To determine outcomes, we followed 2 affected children for ≈30 months. For 1 who was symptomatic at birth, transient hepatitis developed. However, neurodevelopment for both children was age appropriate.

Keywords: Zika Virus; Zika Congenital Syndrome; French Polynesia.

——

#Zika Virus #Seroprevalence, French #Polynesia, 2014–2015 (@CDC_EIDjournal, abstract)

[Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Volume 23, Number 4—April 2017 / Dispatch

Zika Virus Seroprevalence, French Polynesia, 2014–2015

Maite Aubry, Anita Teissier, Michael Huart, Sébastien Merceron, Jessica Vanhomwegen, Claudine Roche, Anne-Laure Vial, Sylvianne Teururai, Sébastien Sicard, Sylvie Paulous, Philippe Desprès, Jean-Claude Manuguerra, Henri-Pierre Mallet, Didier Musso, Xavier Deparis, and Van-Mai Cao-Lormeau

Author affiliations: Institut Louis Malardé, Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia (M. Aubry, A. Teissier, C. Roche, S. Teururai, D. Musso, V.-M. Cao-Lormeau); Centre d’Épidémiologie et de Santé Publique des Armées, Marseille, France (M. Huart, S. Sicard, X. Deparis); Unité Mixte de Recherche Sciences Economiques et Sociales de la Santé et Traitement de l’Information Médicale, Marseille (M. Huart, S. Sicard, X. Deparis); Institut de la Statistique de la Polynésie Française, Papeete (S. Merceron); Institut Pasteur, Paris, France (J. Vanhomwegen, S. Paulous, J.-C. Manuguerra); Direction Départementale de la Cohésion Sociale et de la Protection des Populations, Yonne, France (A.-L. Vial); Direction de la Santé de la Polynésie Française, Papeete (A.-L. Vial, H.-P. Mallet); Université de La Réunion, Sainte Clotilde, France (P. Desprès)

 

Abstract

During 2013–2014, French Polynesia experienced an outbreak of Zika virus infection. Serosurveys conducted at the end of the outbreak and 18 months later showed lower than expected disease prevalence rates (49%) and asymptomatic:symptomatic case ratios (1:1) in the general population but significantly different prevalence rates (66%) and asymptomatic:symptomatic ratios (1:2) in schoolchildren.

Keywords: Zika Virus; Seroprevalence; French Polynesia.

—–

Molecular #detection of #Zika virus in #blood and #RNA load #determination during the French #Polynesian #outbreak (J Med Virol., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

J Med Virol. 2016 Nov 14. doi: 10.1002/jmv.24735. [Epub ahead of print]

Molecular detection of Zika virus in blood and RNA load determination during the French Polynesian outbreak.

Musso D1,2, Rouault E1, Teissier A2, Lanteri MC3,4, Zisou K1, Broult J5, Grange E1, Nhan TX1, Aubry M2.

Author information: 1Laboratoire de biologie médicale, Institut Louis Malardé, Tahiti, Polynésie Française. 2Unit of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Institut Louis Malardé, Tahiti, Polynésie Française. 3Blood System Research Institute, San Francisco, CA. 4Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. 5Centre de transfusion sanguine, Tahiti, Polynésie Française.

 

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Zika virus (ZIKV) viremia is reported as low and transient, however, these estimates rely on limited data. We report RNA loads in sera collected from symptomatic patients during the 2013-2014 French Polynesian ZIKV outbreak.

METHODS:

We performed molecular detection of ZIKV RNA in sera from 747 patients presenting with suspected acute phase ZIKV infection. Among patients with confirmed infection, we analyzed the duration of viremia, assessed viral RNA loads and recorded the main clinical symptoms.

RESULTS:

A total of 210/747 (28.1%) sera tested positive using a ZIKV-specific RT-PCR. Viral RNA loads in symptomatic patients that ranged from 5 to 3.7 × 106 copies/mL (mean 9.9 × 104 copies/mL) were not related to a particular clinical presentation, and were significantly lower than those previously obtained from asymptomatic ZIKV infected blood donors.

CONCLUSIONS:

The rate of detection of ZIKV RNA in sera from suspected cases of acute phase ZIKV infection was low. ZIKV RNA loads were lower in symptomatic patients compared to asymptomatic blood donors and were lower than RNA loads usually reported in dengue infections. As there is no abrupt onset of symptoms in ZIKV infections, we suggest that infected patients sought for medical attention when viremia was already decreasing or had resolved.

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS: Arbovirus; French Polynesia; RNA load; RT-PCR; Zika virus

PMID: 27859375 DOI: 10.1002/jmv.24735

[PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Keywords: Zika Virus; French Polynesia.

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#Vector #Competence of French #Polynesian #Aedes aegypti and Aedes polynesiensis for #Zika Virus (PLoS Negl Trop Dis., abstract)

[Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

OPEN ACCESS / PEER-REVIEWED / RESEARCH ARTICLE

Vector Competence of French Polynesian Aedes aegypti and Aedes polynesiensis for Zika Virus

Vaea Richard , Tuterarii Paoaafaite, Van-Mai Cao-Lormeau

Published: September 21, 2016 / http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0005024

 

Abstract

Background

In 2013–2014, French Polynesia experienced for the first time a Zika outbreak. Two Aedes mosquitoes may have contributed to Zika virus (ZIKV) transmission in French Polynesia: the worldwide distributed Ae. aegypti and the Polynesian islands-endemic Ae. polynesiensis mosquito.

Methodology/Principal Findings

To evaluate their vector competence for ZIKV, mosquitoes were infected per os at viral titers of 7 logs tissue culture infectious dose 50%. At several days post-infection (dpi), saliva was collected from each mosquito and inoculated onto C6/36 mosquito cells to check for the presence of ZIKV infectious particles. Legs and body of each mosquito were also collected and submitted separately to RNA extraction and ZIKV RT-PCR. In Ae. aegypti the infection rate was high as early as 6 dpi and the dissemination efficiency get substantial from 9 dpi while the both rates remained quite low in Ae. polynesiensis. The transmission efficiency was poor in Ae. aegypti until 14 dpi and no infectious saliva was found in Ae. polynesiensis at the time points studied.

Conclusions/Significance

In our experimental conditions, the late ability of the French Polynesian Ae. aegypti to transmit ZIKV added by the poor competence of Ae. polynesiensis for this virus suggest the possible contribution of another vector for the propagation of ZIKV during the outbreak, in particular in remote islands where Ae. polynesiensis is predominating.

 

Author Summary

From 2007, Zika virus has caused several outbreaks in the Pacific including French Polynesia. Aedes aegypti mosquito which is present in almost all Pacific Island Countries is reasonably expected to have been involved in the Zika outbreaks. In addition endemic Aedes mosquito species may have sustained Zika virus transmission in the less urbanized and most remote islands. In the present study we provide for the first time data about the vector competence of the endemic Ae. polynesiensis species for Zika virus. We found under experimental conditions a weak competence of Ae. polynesiensis for the virus. Furthermore we demonstrated a late ability of the French Polynesian population of Ae. aegypti to transmit Zika virus. These findings raise questions about the potential involvement of other vector(s) in Zika virus transmission in place or together with the Aedes mosquitoes. In a context where innovative vector control strategies are mostly focused on targeting the mosquito species considered as the main arbovirus vectors, the potential for others vector species to take the lead in transmitting such arboviruses should not be neglected.

______

Citation: Richard V, Paoaafaite T, Cao-Lormeau V-M (2016) Vector Competence of French Polynesian Aedes aegypti and Aedes polynesiensis for Zika Virus. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 10(9): e0005024. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0005024

Editor: Paulo Filemon Pimenta, Fundaçao Oswaldo Cruz, BRAZIL

Received: May 12, 2016; Accepted: September 7, 2016; Published: September 21, 2016

Copyright: © 2016 Richard et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Data Availability: All relevant data are within the paper and its Supporting Information files.

Funding: The authors received no specific funding for this work.

Competing interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Keywords: Research; Abstracts; French Polynesia; Zika Virus; Aedes Aegypti; Aedes polynesiensis.

——

A case of consecutive #infection with #Zika virus and #Chikungunya virus in #BoraBora, French #Polynesia (J Infect Chemother., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

J Infect Chemother. 2016 Sep 2. pii: S1341-321X(16)30142-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jiac.2016.08.003. [Epub ahead of print]

A case of consecutive infection with Zika virus and Chikungunya virus in Bora Bora, French Polynesia.

Kutsuna S1, Kato Y2, Nakayama E3, Taniguchi S3, Takasaki T3, Yamamoto K2, Takeshita N2, Hayakawa K2, Kanagawa S2, Ohmagari N2.

Author information: 1Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: sonare.since1192@gmail.com. 2Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. 3Department of Virology, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan.

 

Abstract

Chikungunya fever (CHIK) and Zika virus (ZIKV) infection have similar endemic areas and clinical manifestations. We report a case of CHIK at 1 year after a ZIKV infection in Bora Bora (French Polynesia), which we diagnosed based on IgM to the CHIK virus and neutralizing antibodies to ZIKV.

Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS: Chikungunya fever; Mosquito-borne diseases; Neutralizing antibody; Zika virus infection

PMID: 27600176 DOI: 10.1016/j.jiac.2016.08.003

[PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Keywords: Research; Abstracts; Zika Virus; Chikungunya Fever; French Polynesia.

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