Characterization of #cefotaxime #resistant #urinary #Escherichia coli from primary care in South-West #England 2017–18 (J Antimicrob Chemother., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Characterization of cefotaxime-resistant urinary Escherichia coli from primary care in South-West England 2017–18

Jacqueline Findlay, Virginia C Gould, Paul North, Karen E Bowker, Martin O Williams, Alasdair P MacGowan, Matthew B Avison

Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, dkz397, https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkz397

Published: 20 September 2019

 

Abstract

Objectives

Third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli from community-acquired urinary tract infections are increasingly reported worldwide. We sought to determine and characterize the mechanisms of cefotaxime resistance employed by urinary E. coli obtained from primary care, over 12 months, in Bristol and surrounding counties in South-West England.

Methods

Cefalexin-resistant E. coli isolates were identified from GP-referred urine samples using disc susceptibility testing. Cefotaxime resistance was determined by subsequent plating onto MIC breakpoint plates. β-Lactamase genes were detected by PCR. WGS was performed on 225 isolates and analyses were performed using the Center for Genomic Epidemiology platform. Patient information provided by the referring general practices was reviewed.

Results

Cefalexin-resistant E. coli (n = 900) isolates were obtained from urines from 146 general practices. Following deduplication by patient approximately 69% (576/836) of isolates were cefotaxime resistant. WGS of 225 isolates identified that the most common cefotaxime-resistance mechanism was blaCTX-M carriage (185/225), followed by plasmid-mediated AmpCs (pAmpCs) (17/225), AmpC hyperproduction (13/225), ESBL blaSHV variants (6/225) or a combination of both blaCTX-M and pAmpC (4/225). Forty-four STs were identified, with ST131 representing 101/225 isolates, within which clade C2 was dominant (54/101). Ciprofloxacin resistance was observed in 128/225 (56.9%) of sequenced isolates, predominantly associated with fluoroquinolone-resistant clones ST131 and ST1193.

Conclusions

Most cefalexin-resistant E. coli isolates were cefotaxime resistant, predominantly caused by blaCTX-M carriage. The correlation between cefotaxime resistance and ciprofloxacin resistance was largely attributable to the high-risk pandemic clones ST131 and ST1193. Localized epidemiological data provide greater resolution than regional data and can be valuable for informing treatment choices in the primary care setting.

Issue Section: ORIGINAL RESEARCH

© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model)

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Cephalosporins; Fluoroquinolones; E. Coli; UTI; Cefalexin; Cefotaxime; UK; England.

——

Advertisements

In vitro #bactericidal activity of #amoxicillin combined with different #cephalosporins against #endocarditis-associated #Enterococcus faecalis clinical isolates (J Antimicrob Chemother., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

In vitro bactericidal activity of amoxicillin combined with different cephalosporins against endocarditis-associated Enterococcus faecalis clinical isolates

Nathan Peiffer-Smadja, Elena Guillotel, David Luque-Paz, Naouale Maataoui, F-Xavier Lescure, Vincent Cattoir

Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, dkz388, https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkz388

Published: 08 September 2019

 

Abstract

Background

The combination of amoxicillin with cefazolin could be an interesting regimen for the empirical therapy of severe infective endocarditis, but its activity against enterococci is unknown.

Objectives

To evaluate in vitro the bactericidal activity of the combination of amoxicillin with different cephalosporins including cefazolin.

Methods

Combinations of amoxicillin (at MIC × ¼) with cefazolin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, cefepime, ceftaroline or ceftobiprole (at the mean free plasma concentration) were studied using time–kill experiments for 10 endocarditis-associated Enterococcus faecalis strains and 2 reference strains.

Results

The combinations amoxicillin/cefazolin, amoxicillin/cefotaxime, amoxicillin/ceftriaxone and amoxicillin/cefepime were synergistic at 12 and 24 h against 12/12 strains and amoxicillin/ceftobiprole and amoxicillin/ceftaroline against 10/12 strains. The combination amoxicillin/cefepime was bactericidal at 24 h against 9/12 strains, the combination amoxicillin/cefazolin against 8/12 strains, the combinations amoxicillin/ceftaroline, amoxicillin/cefotaxime and amoxicillin/ceftobiprole against 7/12 strains and the combination amoxicillin/ceftriaxone against 6/12 strains.

Conclusions

The combination amoxicillin/cefazolin is as synergistic and bactericidal in vitro as amoxicillin/cefotaxime or amoxicillin/ceftriaxone against E. faecalis.

Issue Section: ORIGINAL RESEARCH

Keywords: Antibiotics; Amoxicillin; Cephalosporins; Endocarditis; Enterococcus faecalis.

——

Polyclonal #gut #colonization with extended-spectrum #cephalosporin- and/or #colistin-resistant #Enterobacteriaceae: a normal status for #hotel employees on the island of #Zanzibar, Tanzania (J Antimicrob Chemother., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Polyclonal gut colonization with extended-spectrum cephalosporin- and/or colistin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae: a normal status for hotel employees on the island of Zanzibar, Tanzania

Thomas Büdel, Esther Kuenzli, Mathieu Clément, Odette J Bernasconi, Jan Fehr,Ali Haji Mohammed, Nadir Khatib Hassan, Jakob Zinsstag, Christoph Hatz,Andrea Endimiani

Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, dkz296, https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkz296

Published: 30 July 2019

 

Abstract

Objectives

For low-income countries, data regarding the intestinal colonization with extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant (ESC-R) and colistin-resistant (CST-R) Enterobacteriaceae in the community are still scarce. Here, we investigated this phenomenon by analysing hotel employees in Zanzibar.

Methods

During June to July 2018, rectal swabs from 59 volunteers were screened implementing selective enrichments and agar plates. Species identification was achieved using MALDI-TOF MS. Strains were characterized using microdilution panels (MICs), microarray, PCRs for mcr-1/-8, repetitive extragenic palindromic-PCR (rep-PCR) and WGS.

Results

Colonization prevalence with ESC-R-, CST-R- and mcr-1-positive Enterobacteriaceae were 91.5%, 66.1% and 18.6%, respectively (average: 2.2 strains per volunteer). Overall, 55 ESC-R Escherichia coli (3 also CST-R), 33 ESC-R Klebsiella pneumoniae (1 also CST-R), 17 CST-R E. coli and 21 CST-R K. pneumoniae were collected. The following main resistance genes were found: ESC-R E. coli (blaCTX-M-15-like, 51.0%), ESC-R K. pneumoniae (blaCTX-M-9-like, 42.9%), CST-R E. coli (mcr-1, 55%) and CST-R K. pneumoniae (D150G substitution in PhoQ). ESBL-producing E. coli mainly belonged to ST361, ST636 and ST131, whereas all those that were mcr-1 positive belonged to ST46 that carried mcr-1 in a 33 kb IncX4 plasmid. ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae mainly belonged to ST17, ST1741 and ST101, whereas CST-R strains belonged to ST11.

Conclusions

We recorded remarkably high colonization prevalence with ESC-R and/or CST-R Enterobacteriaceae in hotel staff. Further research in the local environment, livestock and food chain is warranted to understand this phenomenon. Moreover, as Zanzibar is a frequent holiday destination, attention should be paid to the risk of international travellers becoming colonized and thereby importing life-threatening pathogens into their low-prevalence countries.

Keywords: Enterobacteriaceae; Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Cephalosporins; Colistin; MCR1; Tanzania.

——

#Trends and prediction of #antimicrobial susceptibility in #urinary #bacteria isolated in #European emergency departments: the #EuroUTI 2010-2016 Study (J Antimicrob Chemother., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Trends and prediction of antimicrobial susceptibility in urinary bacteria isolated in European emergency departments: the EuroUTI 2010-2016 Study

Alice Quaegebeur, Loïc Brunard, François Javaudin, Marie-Anne Vibet, Pascale Bemer, Quentin Le Bastard, Eric Batard, Emmanuel Montassier, EuroUTI 2010-2016 Study Group

Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, dkz274, https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkz274

Published: 30 June 2019

 

Abstract

Objectives

To assess recent trends in susceptibility to antibiotics among urinary isolates isolated in European emergency departments (EDs) and to identify isolates with a high (90% or more) predicted probability of susceptibility to fluoroquinolones or third-generation cephalosporins (3GCs).

Methods

In this cross-sectional study, we included urine cultures obtained from adult patients between 2010 and 2016 in 24 European EDs. Temporal trends were assessed using time-series analysis and multivariate logistic models. Multivariate logistic models were also used to predict susceptibility to fluoroquinolones or 3GCs from patient age and sex, year, month and ED.

Results

We included 88 242 isolates. Time-series analysis found a significant increase in susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and no significant trend for susceptibility to 3GCs. Adjusting for patient age and sex, ED and organism, multivariate models showed that susceptibility to 3GCs decreased from 2014 to 2016, while susceptibility to fluoroquinolones increased in 2015 and 2016. Among isolates from 2016, multivariate models predicted high probability of susceptibility to fluoroquinolones in 11% of isolates (positive predictive value 91%) and a high probability of susceptibility to 3GCs in 35% of isolates (positive predictive value 94%).

Conclusions

Susceptibility of ED urinary isolates to fluoroquinolones increased from 2014, while susceptibility to 3GCs decreased from 2015. Predictive models identified isolates with a high probability of susceptibility to fluoroquinolones or 3GCs. The ability of such models to guide the empirical treatment of pyelonephritis in the ED remains to be determined.

Topic: antibiotics – cephalosporins – adult – emergency service, hospital – fluoroquinolones – pyelonephritis – urinary tract – bacteria – urine culture – antimicrobial susceptibility

Issue Section: ORIGINAL RESEARCH

© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model)

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Fluoroquinolones; Cephalosporins; UTI; European Region.

——

#Outcomes of Third-Generation #Cephalosporin Plus #Ciprofloxacin or #Doxycycline Therapy in Patients with #Vibrio vulnificus #Septicemia: A Propensity Score-Matched Analysis (PLoS Negl Trop Dis., abstract)

[Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

OPEN ACCESS /  PEER-REVIEWED / RESEARCH ARTICLE

Outcomes of Third-Generation Cephalosporin Plus Ciprofloxacin or Doxycycline Therapy in Patients with Vibrio vulnificus Septicemia: A Propensity Score-Matched Analysis

Seong Eun Kim, Sung Un Shin, Tae Hoon Oh, Uh Jin Kim, Kalifa Sanneh Darboe, Seung-Ji Kang, Hee-Chang Jang, Sook-In Jung, Hee-Young Shin, Kyung-Hwa Park

Published: June 12, 2019 / DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0007478 / This is an uncorrected proof.

 

Abstract

Background

Combination therapy with a third-generation cephalosporin (TGC) and a tetracycline analogue is recommended for Vibrio vulnificus infection. The combination of a TGC and ciprofloxacin has synergistic in vitro bactericidal activity against V. vulnificus. No clinical study has compared the standard regimen with TGC plus ciprofloxacin therapy for V. vulnificus infection.

Methods

Patients with a confirmed V. vulnificus infection at two medical centers in Korea from 1991 to 2016 were enrolled in this study. The patients were grouped according to the type of antibiotic administered. A retrospective propensity-score-matched case-control study of patients treated with TGC plus doxycycline or TGC plus ciprofloxacin was performed. The clinical characteristics and outcomes of the patients were analyzed.

Results

A total of 218 patients were confirmed to have V. vulnificus septicemia during the study, and the 30-day survival rate was 39% (85/218). The patients were classified into the following six treatment groups: TGC monotherapy (n = 82), TGC plus doxycycline therapy (n = 42), TGC plus ciprofloxacin therapy (n = 39), ciprofloxacin monotherapy (n = 14), other β-lactam monotherapy (n = 10), and other (n = 31). The survival rates of these groups were as follows: TGC monotherapy (35%), TGC plus doxycycline (38%), TGC plus ciprofloxacin (54%), ciprofloxacin monotherapy (29%), other β-lactam (20%), and other (39%). The 30-day survival rate showed no significant difference between the TGC plus doxycycline and TGC plus ciprofloxacin groups (log-rank test, P = 0.18). Among the 81 patients treated with TGC plus doxycycline or TGC plus ciprofloxacin, 12 per treatment group were selected by propensity-score matching. There was no significant difference in the baseline characteristics or the frequency of fasciotomy between the two groups. The 30-day survival rate showed no significant difference between the TGC plus doxycycline (50%) and TGC plus ciprofloxacin (67%) groups (log-rank test, P = 0.46).

Conclusion

Our data suggest that the outcome of TGC plus ciprofloxacin therapy was comparable to that of TGC plus doxycycline therapy in patients with V. vulnificus septicemia.

 

Author summary

The combination of a third-generation cephalosporin (TGC) and ciprofloxacin has synergy in vitro bactericidal activity against V. vulnificus. No clinical study has compared the standard regimen with TGC plus ciprofloxacin therapy for V. vulnificus infection. A total of 218 patients were enrolled who are confirmed to have V. vulnificus septicemia in two medical centers in Korea from 1991 to 2016. The 30-day survival rate was 39% (85/218) for all patients, 38% (16/42) for TGC plus doxycycline and 54% (21/39) for TGC plus ciprofloxacin (log rank test, P = 0.18). A propensity score-matched analysis was performed and 12 per treatment groups were selected. The 30-day survival rate showed no significant difference between the TGC plus doxycycline (50%, 6/12) and TGC plus ciprofloxacin (67%, 4/12) groups (log-rank test, P = 0.46). The outcome of TGC plus ciprofloxacin therapy was comparable to that of TGC plus doxycycline therapy in patients with V. vulnificus septicemia.

___

Citation: Kim SE, Shin SU, Oh TH, Kim UJ, Darboe KS, Kang S-J, et al. (2019) Outcomes of Third-Generation Cephalosporin Plus Ciprofloxacin or Doxycycline Therapy in Patients with Vibrio vulnificus Septicemia: A Propensity Score-Matched Analysis. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 13(6): e0007478. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0007478

Editor: Husain Poonawala, Lowell General Hospital, UNITED STATES

Received: February 18, 2019; Accepted: May 20, 2019; Published: June 12, 2019

Copyright: © 2019 Kim et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Data Availability: All data files are available from the Harvard dataverse database (DOIs https://doi.org/10.7910/DVN/3AZYIP)

Funding: KH Park received funding from CNUH Research Fund, grant number CRI17021-1 (https://www.cnuh.com/main.cs). The funder had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Competing interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Keywords: Vibrio vulnificus; Septicemia; Antibiotics; Cephalosporins; Ciprofloxacin; Doxycyline.

—–

#Carbapenem and #Cephalosporin #Resistance among #Enterobacteriaceae in #Healthcare-Associated #Infections, #California, #USA (Emerg Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Volume 25, Number 7—July 2019 / Dispatch

Carbapenem and Cephalosporin Resistance among Enterobacteriaceae in Healthcare-Associated Infections, California, USA1

Kyle Rizzo  , Sam Horwich-Scholefield, and Erin Epson

Author affiliations: California Department of Public Health, Richmond, California, USA

 

Abstract

We analyzed antimicrobial susceptibility test results reported in healthcare-associated infections by California hospitals during 2014–2017. Approximately 3.2% of Enterobacteriaceae reported in healthcare-associated infections were resistant to carbapenems and 26.9% were resistant to cephalosporins. The proportion of cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli increased 7% (risk ratio 1.07, 95% CI 1.04–1.11) per year during 2014–2017.

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Carbapenem; Cephalosporins; Nosocomial Outbreraks; California; USA.

——

#Circulation of #plasmids harboring #resistance genes to #quinolones and/or extended spectrum #cephalosporins in multiple #Salmonella enterica serotypes from #swine in the #US (Antimicrob Agents Chemother., abstract)

[Source: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Circulation of plasmids harboring resistance genes to quinolones and/or extended spectrum cephalosporins in multiple Salmonella enterica serotypes from swine in the United States

Ehud Elnekave, Samuel L. Hong, Seunghyun Lim, Shivdeep Singh Hayer, Dave Boxrud, Angela J. Taylor, Victoria Lappi, Noelle Noyes, Timothy J. Johnson, Albert Rovira, Peter Davies,Andres Perez, Julio Alvarez

DOI: 10.1128/AAC.02602-18

 

ABSTRACT

Nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica (NTS) poses a major public-health risk worldwide that is amplified by the existence of antimicrobial resistant strains, especially to quinolones and extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESC). Little is known on the dissemination of plasmids harboring the acquired genetic determinants that confer resistance to these antimicrobials across NTS serotypes from livestock in the United States.

NTS isolates (n=183) from U.S. swine clinical cases retrieved during 2014-2016 were selected for sequencing based on their phenotypic resistance to enrofloxacin (quinolone) or ceftiofur (3rd-generation cephalosporin). De-novo assemblies were used to identify chromosomal mutations and acquired antimicrobial resistance genes (AARGs). In addition, plasmids harboring AARGs were identified using short-read assemblies and characterized using a multi-step approach that was validated by long-read sequencing.

AARGs to quinolones (qnrB15/qnrB19/qnrB2/qnrD/qnrS1/qnrS2/aac(6′)Ib-cr) and ESC (blaCMY-2/blaCTX-M-1/blaCTX-M-27/blaSHV-12) were distributed across serotypes, and were harbored by several plasmids. In addition, chromosomal mutations associated with resistance to quinolones were identified in the target enzyme and efflux pump regulation genes. The predominant plasmid harboring the prevalent qnrB19 gene was distributed across serotypes. It was identical to a plasmid previously reported in S. Anatum from swine in the U.S. (KY991369.1), and similar to Escherichia coli plasmids from humans in South America (GQ374157.1 and JN979787.1). Our findings suggest that plasmids harboring AARGs to critically important antimicrobials are present in multiple NTS serotypes circulating in swine in the U.S. and can contribute to resistance expansion through horizontal transmission.

Copyright © 2019 American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Cephalosporins; Quinolones; Pigs; USA.

—–