Pharmacokinetics and safety of #aztreonam / #avibactam for the #treatment of complicated intra-abdominal #infections in hospitalized adults: results from the REJUVENATE study (Antimicrob Agents Chemother., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Pharmacokinetics and safety of aztreonam/avibactam for the treatment of complicated intra-abdominal infections in hospitalized adults: results from the REJUVENATE study

Oliver A Cornely, José M Cisneros, Julian Torre-Cisneros, María Jesús Rodríguez-Hernández, Luis Tallón-Aguilar, Esther Calbo, Juan P Horcajada, Christian Queckenberg, Ulrike Zettelmeyer, Dorothee Arenz, Clara M Rosso-Fernández, Silvia Jiménez-Jorge, Guy Turner, Susan Raber, Seamus O’Brien, Alison Luckey, COMBACTE-CARE consortium/REJUVENATE Study Group

Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, dkz497, https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkz497

Published: 12 December 2019

 

Abstract

Objectives

To investigate pharmacokinetics (PK) and safety (primary objectives) and efficacy (secondary objective) of the investigational monobactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combination aztreonam/avibactam in patients with complicated intra-abdominal infection (cIAI).

Methods

This Phase 2a open-label, multicentre study (NCT02655419; EudraCT 2015-002726-39) enrolled adults with cIAI into sequential cohorts for 5–14 days treatment. Cohort 1 patients received an aztreonam/avibactam loading dose of 500/137 mg (30 min infusion), followed by maintenance doses of 1500/410 mg (3 h infusions) q6h; Cohort 2 received 500/167 mg (30 min infusion), followed by 1500/500 mg (3 h infusions) q6h. Cohort 3 was an extension of exposure at the higher dose regimen. Doses were adjusted for creatinine clearance of 31–50 mL/min (Cohorts 2 + 3). All patients received IV metronidazole 500 mg q8h. PK, safety and efficacy were assessed.

Results

Thirty-four patients (Cohort 1, n = 16; Cohorts 2 + 3, n = 18) comprised the modified ITT (MITT) population. Mean exposures of aztreonam and avibactam in Cohorts 2 + 3 were consistent with those predicted to achieve joint PK/pharmacodynamic target attainment in >90% patients. Adverse events (AEs) were similar between cohorts. The most common AEs were hepatic enzyme increases [n = 9 (26.5%)] and diarrhoea [n = 5 (14.7%)]. Clinical cure rates at the test-of-cure visit overall were 20/34 (58.8%) (MITT) and 14/23 (60.9%) (microbiological-MITT population).

Conclusions

Observed AEs were consistent with the known safety profile of aztreonam monotherapy, with no new safety concerns identified. These data support selection of the aztreonam/avibactam 500/167 mg (30 min infusion) loading dose and 1500/500 mg (3 h infusions) maintenance dose q6h regimen, in patients with creatinine clearance >50 mL/min, for the Phase 3 development programme.

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Aztreonam; Avibactam.

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Successful rescue #treatment of #sepsis due to a #PDR, #NDM-producing #Klebsiella pneumoniae using #aztreonam powder for nebulizer solution as IV therapy in combination with #ceftazidime/avibactam (J Antimicrob Chemother., summary)

[Source: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Summary, edited.]

Successful rescue treatment of sepsis due to a pandrug-resistant, NDM-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae using aztreonam powder for nebulizer solution as intravenous therapy in combination with ceftazidime/avibactam

Elske Sieswerda, Marre van den Brand, Roland B van den Berg, Joris Sträter, Leo Schouls, Karin van Dijk, Andries E Budding

Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, dkz495, https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkz495

Published: 02 December 2019

___

Sir,

Pandrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae that produces New Delhi MBL (NDM) is increasingly reported worldwide.1 These strains contain multiple β-lactamase genes but also may have acquired resistance to last-resort options such as colistin and tigecycline. Combining aztreonam and avibactam is potentially effective in MDR, NDM-producing Enterobacterales.2 Avibactam inhibits class A, C and D ESBLs, cephalosporinases and carbapenemases, while aztreonam is stable to hydrolysis by class B MBLs such as NDM. Until this drug combination becomes available, one could combine aztreonam and ceftazidime/avibactam to treat serious infections with such strains. A small number of studies have reported on 13 patients with serious infections with NDM-producing Enterobacterales who were successfully treated with aztreonam and ceftazidime/avibactam.3–7 Evidence of clinical efficacy and safety is therefore limited at present. Also, aztreonam for IV use is not registered and readily available in many countries, including the Netherlands. We describe successful rescue treatment of a patient with sepsis due to a pandrug-resistant, NDM-producing K. pneumoniae using aztreonam powder for nebulizer solution as IV therapy in combination with ceftazidime/avibactam.

(…)

___

Acknowledgements

We presented this study in March 2019 at the Scientific Spring Meeting 2019 from the Dutch Society of Medical Microbiology, Arnhem, the Netherlands.

Funding

This study was carried out as part of our routine work.

Transparency declarations

None to declare.

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; NDM; Klebsiella pneumoniae; Sepsis; Aztreonam; Ceftazidime; Avibactam.

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Searching for the Optimal #Treatment for Metallo- and Serine-β-Lactamase Producing #Enterobacteriaceae: #Aztreonam in Combination with #Ceftazidime-avibactam or #Meropenem-vaborbactam (AAC, abstract)

[Source: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Searching for the Optimal Treatment for Metallo- and Serine-β-Lactamase Producing Enterobacteriaceae: Aztreonam in Combination with Ceftazidime-avibactam or Meropenem-vaborbactam

M Biagi, T Wu, M Lee, S Patel, D Butler, E Wenzler

DOI: 10.1128/AAC.01426-19

 

ABSTRACT

Objective:

Metallo-β-lactamase (MBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae, particularly those that co-harbor serine β-lactamases, are a serious emerging public health threat given their rapid dissemination and the limited number of treatment options. Pre-clinical and anecdotal clinical data support the use of aztreonam in combination with ceftazidime-avibactam against these pathogens, but other aztreonam-based combinations have not been explored. The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro activity and compare synergy between aztreonam in combination with ceftazidime-avibactam and meropenem-vaborbactam against serine and MBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae via time-kill analyses.

Methods:

8 clinical Enterobacteriaceae strains (4 Escherichia coli and 4 Klebsiella pneumoniae) co-producing NDM and at least one serine β-lactamase were used for all experiments. Drugs were tested alone, in dual β-lactam combinations, and in triple drug combinations against all strains.

Results:

All strains were resistant to ceftazidime-avibactam and meropenem-vaborbactam and 7/8 (87.5%) strains were resistant to aztreonam. Aztreonam combined with ceftazidime-avibactam was synergistic against all 7 aztreonam-resistant strains. Aztreonam combined with meropenem-vaborbactam was synergistic against all aztreonam-resistant strains with the exception of an OXA-232-producing K. pneumoniae strain. Neither triple combination was synergistic against the aztreonam-susceptible strain. Likewise, neither dual β-lactam combination was synergistic against any strain.

Conclusions:

These data suggest that aztreonam plus meropenem-vaborbactam has similar activity to aztreonam plus ceftazidime-avibactam against Enterobacteriaceae producing NDM and other non-OXA-48-like serine β-lactamases. Confirmation of these findings in future in vitro and in vivo models is warranted.

Copyright © 2019 American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Beta-lactams; NDM; Aztreonam; Meropenem; Vaborbactam; Ceftazidime; Avibactam; Enterobacteriaceae.

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Potentiation of #betalactam #antibiotics and β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations against #MDR and #XDR #Pseudomonas aeruginosa using non-ribosomal #tobramycin–cyclam conjugates (J Antimicrob Chemother., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Potentiation of β-lactam antibiotics and β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations against MDR and XDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa using non-ribosomal tobramycin–cyclam conjugates

Temilolu Idowu, Derek Ammeter, Gilbert Arthur, George G Zhanel, Frank Schweizer

Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, dkz228, https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkz228

Published: 28 May 2019

 

Abstract

Objectives

To develop a multifunctional adjuvant molecule that can rescue β-lactam antibiotics and β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations from resistance in carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates.

Methods

Preparation of adjuvant was guided by structure–activity relationships, following standard protocols. Susceptibility and chequerboard studies were assessed using serial 2-fold dilution assays. Toxicity was evaluated against porcine erythrocytes, human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells and liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells via MTS assay. Preliminary in vivo efficacy was evaluated using a Galleria mellonella infection model.

Results

Conjugation of tobramycin and cyclam abrogates the ribosomal effects of tobramycin but confers a potent adjuvant property that restores full antibiotic activity of meropenem and aztreonam against carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa. Therapeutic levels of susceptibility, as determined by CLSI susceptibility breakpoints, were attained in several MDR clinical isolates, and time–kill assays revealed a synergistic dose-dependent pharmacodynamic relationship. A triple combination of the adjuvant with ceftazidime/avibactam (approved), aztreonam/avibactam (Phase III) and meropenem/avibactam enhances the efficacies of β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitors against recalcitrant strains, suggesting rapid access of the combination to their periplasmic targets. The newly developed adjuvants, and their combinations, were non-haemolytic and non-cytotoxic, and preliminary in vivo evaluation in G. mellonella suggests therapeutic potential for the double and triple combinations.

Conclusions

Non-ribosomal tobramycin–cyclam conjugate mitigates the effect of OprD/OprF porin loss in P. aeruginosa and potentiates β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitors against carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates, highlighting the complexity of resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. Our strategy presents an avenue to further preserve the therapeutic utility of β-lactam antibiotics.

Topic: antibiotics – pseudomonas aeruginosa – immunologic adjuvants – pharmaceutical adjuvants – aztreonam – ceftazidime – lactams – ribosomes – infection – tobramycin – meropenem – toxic effect – potentiation – avibactam – carbapenem resistance

Issue Section: ORIGINAL RESEARCH

© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model)

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Carbapenem; Beta-lactams; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Tobramycin; Aztreonam; Avibactam; Ceftazidime.

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#SME-4-producing #Serratia marcescens from #Argentina belonging to clade 2 of the S. marcescens phylogeny (J Antimicrob Chemother., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

SME-4-producing Serratia marcescens from Argentina belonging to clade 2 of the S. marcescens phylogeny

Laura Dabos, Rafael Patiño-Navarrete, Marcela Nastro, Angela Famiglietti, Philippe Glaser, Carlos H Rodriguez, Thierry Naas

Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, dkz115, https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkz115

Published: 16 April 2019

 

Abstract

Background

SME carbapenemases are increasingly reported, especially from North and South America. Here, we describe an SME-4-producing Serratia marcescens(SME-Sm) clinical isolate from Argentina and compare its genome with other SME-Sm and Sm isolates recovered from public databases.

Methods

Sm isolates were characterized by WGS using Illumina technology, susceptibility testing and MIC determination. Carbapenemase activity was revealed by biochemical tests based on imipenem hydrolysis. A whole-genome phylogeny was estimated for all the Sm isolates retrieved from public databases with kSNP3 and a whole-genome phylogenetic analysis based on non-recombinant core SNPs was inferred for Sm complete genomes and for those encoding any blaSME variants.

Results

Sm163 was resistant to amoxicillin, temocillin, aztreonam and carbapenems, remaining susceptible to extended-spectrum cephalosporins. WGS analysis of Sm163 revealed a genome of 5 139 329 bp and a chromosomally encoded blaSME-4 carbapenemase gene located on a genomic island closely related to SmarGI1-1 of Sm N11-02820. Comparison of the Sm genomes revealed that the 14 SME-Sm isolates possess this genomic island inserted at the same loci, that 13/14 belong to clade 1 and that 11/14 form a well-defined subcluster of cluster I of Sm clade 1, while Sm163 belongs to clade 2, suggesting that an SME-encoding genomic island may have been transferred between isolates from different clades.

Conclusions

To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of an SME-4-encoding Smfrom Argentina. The blaSME-4 gene is located on a SmarGI1-1-like genomic island. The genome of Sm163 belongs to clade 2, unlike all the other SME-Smisolates, which belong to clade 1.

Issue Section: ORIGINAL RESEARCH

© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model)

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Carbapene; Serratia marcescens; Amoxicillin; Temocillin; Aztreonam; Argentina.

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Activity of #nacubactam (RG6080/OP0595) combinations against #MBL-producing #Enterobacteriaceae (J Antimicrob Chemother., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Activity of nacubactam (RG6080/OP0595) combinations against MBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae

Shazad Mushtaq, Anna Vickers, Neil Woodford, Andreas Haldimann, David M Livermore

Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, dky522, https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/dky522

Published: 24 December 2018

 

Abstract

Background

Diazabicyclooctanes (DBOs) are promising β-lactamase inhibitors. Some, including nacubactam (OP0595/RG6080), also bind PBP2 and have an enhancer effect, allowing activity against Enterobacteriaceae with MBLs, which DBOs do not inhibit. We tested the activity of nacubactam/β-lactam combinations against MBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae.

Methods

Test panels comprised (i) 210 consecutive Enterobacteriaceae with NDM or VIM MBLs, as referred by UK diagnostic laboratories, and (ii) 99 supplementary MBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae, representing less prevalent phenotypes, species and enzymes. MICs were determined by CLSI agar dilution.

Results

MICs of nacubactam alone were bimodal, clustering at 1–8 mg/L or >32 mg/L; >85% of values for Escherichia coli and Enterobacter spp. fell into the low MIC cluster, whereas Proteeae were universally resistant and the Klebsiella spp. were divided between the two groups. Depending on the prospective breakpoint (4 + 4 or 8 + 4 mg/L), and on whether all isolates were considered or solely the Consecutive Collection, meropenem/nacubactam and cefepime/nacubactam inhibited 80.3%–93.3% of MBL producers, with substantial gains over nacubactam alone. Against the most resistant isolates (comprising 57 organisms with MICs of nacubactam >32 mg/L, cefepime ≥128 mg/L and meropenem ≥128 mg/L), cefepime/nacubactam at 8 + 4 mg/L inhibited 63.2% and meropenem/nacubactam at 8 + 4 mg/L inhibited 43.9%. Aztreonam/nacubactam, incorporating an MBL-stable β-lactam partner, was almost universally active against the MBL producers and, unlike aztreonam/avibactam, had an enhancer effect.

Conclusions

Nacubactam combinations, including those using MBL-labile β-lactams, e.g. meropenem and cefepime, can overcome most MBL-mediated resistance. This behaviour reflects nacubactam’s direct antibacterial and enhancer activity.

Topic: phenotype – cefepime – agar – aztreonam – enterobacter – enterobacteriaceae – klebsiella – laboratory – lactams – diagnosis – enzymes – meropenem – anti-bacterial agents – escherichia coli – enhancer of transcription – dilution technique – dilute (action) – binding (molecular function) – malnutrition-inflammation-cachexia syndrome – avibactam

Issue Section: ORIGINAL RESEARCH

© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model)

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Enterobacteriaceae; Aztreonam; Meropenem; Nacubactam.

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Clinical #outcomes after combination #treatment with #ceftazidime / #avibactam and #aztreonam for NDM-1/OXA-48/CTX-M-15-producing #Klebsiella pneumoniae infection (J Antimicrob Chemother., summary)

[Source: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Summary, edited.]

Clinical outcomes after combination treatment with ceftazidime/avibactam and aztreonam for NDM-1/OXA-48/CTX-M-15-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae infection

Evelyn Shaw, Alexander Rombauts, Fe Tubau, Ariadna Padullés, Jordi Càmara, Toni Lozano, Sara Cobo-Sacristán, Núria Sabe, Imma Grau, Raül Rigo-Bonnin, M Angeles Dominguez, Jordi Carratalà

Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, dkx496, https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkx496

Published:  19 December 2017

_____

Sir,

The growing spread of bacteria producing carbapenemases, such as the New Delhi MBL (NDM),1 has created an urgent need to identify effective therapeutic options that can treat serious infections caused by these XDR bacteria. Ceftazidime/avibactam has been successfully used to treat infection caused by carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae;2,3 however, the combination lacks activity against strains producing NDM. These carbapenemases remain susceptible to aztreonam, although most MBL-producing isolates also harbour ESBLs or other β-lactamases that confer resistance to aztreonam.4 The combination of aztreonam and avibactam has demonstrated potent in vitroactivity against MBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae including those isolates that also carry other β-lactamases.5 However, this combination is currently in clinical development and unavailable for clinical use.

(…)

____

Issue Section:  Research letter

© The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Klebsiella Pneumoniae; NDM1; Ceftazidime; Avibactam; Aztreonam.

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