#Characterization of Highly Pathogenic #Avian #Influenza Virus A(#H5N6), #Japan, November 2016 (@CDC_EIDjournal, abstract)

[Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Volume 23, Number 4—April 2017 / Dispatch

Characterization of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus A(H5N6), Japan, November 2016

Masatoshi Okamatsu1, Makoto Ozawa1, Kosuke Soda1, Hiroki Takakuwa1, Atsushi Haga, Takahiro Hiono, Aya Matsuu, Yuko Uchida, Ritsuko Iwata, Keita Matsuno, Masakazu Kuwahara, Toshiyo Yabuta, Tatsufumi Usui, Hiroshi Ito, Manabu Onuma, Yoshihiro Sakoda, Takehiko Saito, Koichi Otsuki, Toshihiro Ito, and Hiroshi Kida

Author affiliations: Hokkaido University, Sapporo Japan (M. Okamatsu, T. Hiono, K. Matsuno, Y. Sakoda, H. Kida); Kagoshima University, Kagoshima, Japan (M. Ozawa, A. Matsuu); University, Yamaguchi, Japan (M. Ozawa, A. Matsuu); Tottori University, Tottori, Japan (K. Soda, T. Usui, H. Ito, K. Otsuki, T. Ito); Kyoto Sangyo University, Kyoto, Japan (H. Takakuwa, T. Yabuta, K. Otsuki); Matsuoka Research Institute for Science, Koganei, Tokyo, Japan (M. Kuwahara); National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, Tsukuba, Japan (Y. Uchida, T. Saito); National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan (A. Haga, R. Iwata, M. Onuma)

 

Abstract

Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) A(H5N6) were concurrently introduced into several distant regions of Japan in November 2016. These viruses were classified into the genetic clade 2.3.4.4c and were genetically closely related to H5N6 HPAIVs recently isolated in South Korea and China. In addition, these HPAIVs showed further antigenic drift.

Keywords: Avian Influenza; H5N6; Japan.

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#Reassortant Clade 2.3.4.4 #Avian #Influenza A(#H5N6) Virus in a Wild Mandarin #Duck, South #Korea, 2016 (@CDC_EIDjournal, abstract)

[Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Volume 23, Number 5—May 2017 / Dispatch

Reassortant Clade 2.3.4.4 Avian Influenza A(H5N6) Virus in a Wild Mandarin Duck, South Korea, 2016

Jung-Hoon Kwon1, Dong-Hun Lee1, David E. Swayne, Jin-Yong Noh, Seong-Su Yuk, Tseren-Ochir Erdene-Ochir, Woo-Tack Hong, Jei-Hyun Jeong, Sol Jeong, Gyeong-Bin Gwon, Seok Lee, and Chang-Seon Song

Author affiliations: Konkuk University, Seoul, South Korea (J.-H. Kwon, J.-Y. Noh, S.-S. Yuk, T.-O. Erdene-Ochir, W.-T. Hong, J.-H. Jeong, S. Jeong, G.-B. Gwon, C.-S. Song); US Department of Agriculture, Athens, Georgia, USA (D.-H. Lee, D.E. Swayne); Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (S. Lee)

 

Abstract

A reassortant clade 2.3.4.4 avian influenza A(H5N6) virus was isolated from a fecal sample of a Mandarin duck (Aix galericulata) in South Korea during October 2016. This virus was genetically similar to H5N6 subtype virus isolates from China, Vietnam, Laos, and Hong Kong, including human isolates.

Keywords: Avian Influenza; H5N6; Reassortant Strain; Wild Birds; South Korea.

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#Diversity, #evolution and population dynamics of avian #influenza viruses circulating in the live #poultry markets in #China (Virology, abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Virology. 2017 Feb 18;505:33-41. doi: 10.1016/j.virol.2017.02.009. [Epub ahead of print]

Diversity, evolution and population dynamics of avian influenza viruses circulating in the live poultry markets in China.

Chen LJ1, Lin XD2, Tian JH3, Liao Y4, Ying XH5, Shao JW6, Yu B3, Guo JJ1, Wang MR7, Peng Y3, Shi M8, Holmes EC8, Yang ZQ9, Zhang YZ10.

Author information: 1State Key Laboratory of Virology/Institute of Medical Virology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, China; State Key Laboratory of Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Changping, 102206 Beijing, China. 2Wenzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Wenzhou 325001, Zhejiang Province, China. 3Wuhan Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Wuhan 430015, Hubei Province, China. 4Ganzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Ganzhou 341000, Jiangxi Province, China. 5Yuhuan Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Yuhuan 317600, Zhejiang Province, China. 6State Key Laboratory of Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Changping, 102206 Beijing, China. 7Longquan Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Longquan, Zhejiang Province, China. 8State Key Laboratory of Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Changping, 102206 Beijing, China; Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, Charles Perkins Centre, School of Life and Environmental Sciences and Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. 9State Key Laboratory of Virology/Institute of Medical Virology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, China. Electronic address: zqyang@whu.edu.cn. 10State Key Laboratory of Virology/Institute of Medical Virology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071, China; State Key Laboratory of Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Changping, 102206 Beijing, China. Electronic address: zhangyongzhen@icdc.cn.

 

Abstract

Live poultry markets (LPMs) are an important source of novel avian influenza viruses (AIV). During 2015-2016 we surveyed AIV diversity in ten LPMs in Hubei, Zhejiang and Jiangxi provinces, China. A high diversity and prevalence of AIVs (totaling 12 subtypes) was observed in LPMs in these provinces. Strikingly, however, the subtypes discovered during 2015-2016 were markedly different to those reported by us in these same localities one year previously, suggesting a dynamic shift in viral genetic diversity over the course of a single year. Phylogenetic analyses revealed frequent reassortment, including between high and low pathogenic AIV subtypes and among those that circulate in domestic and wild birds. Notably, the novel H5N6 reassortant virus, which contains a set of H9N2-like internal genes, was prevalent in all three regions surveyed. Overall, these data highlight the profound changes in genetic diversity and in patterns of reassortment in those AIVs that circulate in LPMs.

Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS: Avian influenza virus; Evolution; H5N6 virus; Live poultry markets; Reassortant

PMID: 28222327 DOI: 10.1016/j.virol.2017.02.009

[PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Keywords: Avian Influenza; H5N6; Poultry; China; Reassortant Strain.

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#Aminoacid #substitutions occurring during #adaptation of an emergent #H5N6 #avian #influenza virus to #mammals (Arch Virol., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Arch Virol. 2016 Jun;161(6):1665-70. doi: 10.1007/s00705-016-2826-7. Epub 2016 Mar 21.

Amino acid substitutions occurring during adaptation of an emergent H5N6 avian influenza virus to mammals.

Peng X1, Wu H1, Peng X1, Wu X1, Cheng L1, Liu F1, Ji S1, Wu N2.

Author information: 1State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310003, China. 2State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310003, China. flwnp2013@163.com.

 

Abstract

Avian influenza viruses (AIVs) are known to cross species barriers, and emergent highly pathogenic H5N6 AIVs pose a serious threat to human health and the poultry industry. Here, we serially passaged an H5N6 virus 10 times in BALB/c mice. The pathogenicity of the wild-type 6D2 (WT-6D2) and mammal-adapted 6D2 strain (MA-6D2) were compared. The viral titer in multiple organs and the death rate for MA-6D2 were significantly higher than for WT-6D2. We provide evidence that the mutations HA A150V, NA R143K and G147E, PB2 E627K, and PA A343T may be important for adaptation of H5N6 AIVs to mammals.

KEYWORDS: Avian influenza virus; H5N6; Mammal adaption; Pathogenicity; Serial passage

PMID: 26997612 DOI: 10.1007/s00705-016-2826-7

[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Keywords: Avian Influenza; H5N6.

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#Molecular characterization of a novel #reassortant #H7N6 subtype #avian #influenza virus from #poultry in Eastern #China, in 2016 (Arch Virol., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Arch Virol. 2017 Jan 19. doi: 10.1007/s00705-017-3219-2. [Epub ahead of print]

Molecular characterization of a novel reassortant H7N6 subtype avian influenza virus from poultry in Eastern China, in 2016.

Wu H1, Lu R2, Peng X1, Peng X1, Chen B1, Cheng L1, Wu N3.

Author information: 1State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, 79 Qingchun Road, Hangzhou, 310003, Zhejiang, China. 2Department of Emergency, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou, 310006, China. 3State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, 79 Qingchun Road, Hangzhou, 310003, Zhejiang, China. flwnp2013@163.com.

 

Abstract

During the surveillance for avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in live poultry markets in Eastern China, in 2016, a novel reassortant H7N6 AIV was isolated from a chicken. Phylogenetic analysis showed that this strain received its genes from H9N2, H7N9 and H5N6 AIVs infecting poultry in China. This strain showed moderate pathogenicity in mice and was able to replicate in mice without prior adaptation. Considering that this novel reassorted H7N6 virus was isolated from poultry in this study, it is possible that chickens play an important role in the generation of novel reassorted H7N6 AIVs.

KEYWORDS: Avian influenza viruses; Chickens; H7N6; Reassortment

PMID: 28105530 DOI: 10.1007/s00705-017-3219-2

[PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Keywords: Avian Influenza; H7N6; H7N9; H9N2; Reassortant Strain; Poultry; China.

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#Genetic #characterisation of novel, highly pathogenic #avian #influenza (HPAI) #H5N6 viruses isolated in #birds, South #Korea, November 2016 (@eurosurveillanc, abstract)

[Source: Eurosurveillance, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Eurosurveillance, Volume 22, Issue 1, 05 January 2017  / Rapid communication

Genetic characterisation of novel, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N6 viruses isolated in birds, South Korea, November 2016

Y Si 1 2 , IW Lee 1 2 , E Kim 1 , Y Kim 1 , H Kwon 1 , S Park 1 , HD Nguyen 1 , SM Kim 1 , J Kwon 1 , W Choi 1 , YH Beak 1 , M Song 1 , C Kim 3 , RJ Webby 4 , Y Choi 1

Author affiliations: 1. College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea; 2. These authors contributed equally to this work; 3. College of Veterinary Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, Republic of Korea; 4. Department of Infectious Diseases, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, United States

Correspondence: Young Ki Choi (choiki55@chungbuk.ac.kr)

Citation style for this article: Si Y, Lee IW, Kim E, Kim Y, Kwon H, Park S, Nguyen HD, Kim SM, Kwon J, Choi W, Beak YH, Song M, Kim C, Webby RJ, Choi Y. Genetic characterisation of novel, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N6 viruses isolated in birds, South Korea, November 2016. Euro Surveill. 2017;22(1):pii=30434. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2017.22.1.30434
Received:08 December 2016; Accepted:05 January 2017

 

Abstract

A novel genotype of H5N6 influenza viruses was isolated from migratory birds in South Korea during November 2016. Domestic outbreaks of this virus were associated with die-offs of wild birds near reported poultry cases in Chungbuk province, central South Korea. Genetic analysis and animal studies demonstrated that the Korean H5N6 viruses are highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses and that these viruses are novel reassortants of at least three different subtypes (H5N6, H4N2 and H1N1).

Keywords: Avian Influenza; H5N6; Reassortant Strains; H4N2; H1N1; Poultry; S. Korea.

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#Human #infection with a highly pathogenic #avian #influenza A (#H5N6) virus in #Yunnan province, #China (Infect Dis. (Lond)., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Infect Dis (Lond). 2016;48(6):477-82. doi: 10.3109/23744235.2015.1135253. Epub 2016 Jan 25.

Human infection with a highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N6) virus in Yunnan province, China.

Xu W1, Li H, Jiang L1.

Author information: 1a Yunnan Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention , Kunming , Yunnan , PR China.

 

Abstract

Highly pathogenic avian influenza A H5N6 virus has caused four human infections in China. This study reports the preliminary findings of the first known human case of H5N6 in Yunnan province. The patient initially developed symptoms of sore throat and coughing on 27 January 2015. The disease rapidly progressed to severe pneumonia, multiple organ dysfunctions and acute respiratory distress syndrome and the patient died on 6 February. Virological analysis determined that the virus belonged to H5 clade 2.3.4.4 and it has obtained partial ability for mammalian adaptation and amantadine resistance. Environmental investigation found H5 in 63% of the samples including poultry faeces, tissues, cage surface swabs and sewage from local live poultry markets by real-time RT-PCR. These findings suggest that the expanding and enhancing of surveillance in both avian and humans are necessary to monitor the evolution of H5 influenza virus and to facilitate early detection of suspected cases.

KEYWORDS: H5N6; Highly pathogenic avian influenza; virological analysis

PMID: 27030920 DOI: 10.3109/23744235.2015.1135253

[PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Keywords: Avian Influenza; H5N6; Human; China; Yunnan.

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