The #effect of #migration within the #EU/EEA on the #distribution of #tuberculosis, 2007 to 2013 (@eurosurveillanc, abstract)

[Source: Eurosurveillance, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Eurosurveillance, Volume 21, Issue 12, 24 March 2016 / Research article

The effect of migration within the European Union/European Economic Area on the distribution of tuberculosis, 2007 to 2013

V Hollo 1 , SM Kotila 1 , C Ködmön 1 , P Zucs 1 , MJ van der Werf 1

Author affiliations: 1. European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), Stockholm, Sweden

Correspondence: Vahur Hollo ( vahur.hollo@ecdc.europa.eu)

Citation style for this article: Hollo V, Kotila SM, Ködmön C, Zucs P, van der Werf MJ. The effect of migration within the European Union/European Economic Area on the distribution of tuberculosis, 2007 to 2013. Euro Surveill. 2016;21(12):pii=30171. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2016.21.12.30171

Received:10 March 2015; Accepted:04 January 2016

 

Abstract

Immigration from tuberculosis (TB) high-incidence countries is known to contribute notably to the TB burden in low-incidence countries. However, the effect of migration enabled by the free movement of persons within the European Union (EU)/European Economic Area (EEA) on TB notification has not been analysed. We analysed TB surveillance data from 29 EU/EEA countries submitted for the years 2007–2013 to The European Surveillance System. We used place of birth and nationality as proxy indicators for native, other EU/EEA and non-EU/EEA origin of the TB cases and analysed the characteristics of the subgroups by origin. From 2007–2013, a total of 527,467 TB cases were reported, of which 129,781 (24.6%) were of foreign origin including 12,566 (2.4%) originating from EU/EEA countries other than the reporting country. The countries reporting most TB cases originating from other EU/EEA countries were Germany and Italy, and the largest proportion of TB cases in individuals came from Poland (n=1,562) and Romania (n=6,285). At EU/EEA level only a small proportion of foreign TB cases originated from other EU/EEA countries, however, the uneven distribution of this presumed importation may pose a challenge to TB programmes in some countries.

Keywords: Research; Abstracts; European Union; Migrants; TB.

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#Medical #care for #refugees: A question of #ethics and #public #health (Science Direct, extract)

[Source: Science Direct, full page. (LINK). Extract.]

Editorial

Medical care for refugees: A question of ethics and public health [   R   ]

La atención médica a los refugiados: una cuestión ética y de salud pública

José Antonio Pérez-Molina a,∗, Miriam J. Álvarez-Martínez b, Israel
Molina c

a CSUR de Medicina Tropical, Servicio de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital
Universitario Ramón y Cajal, IRYCIS, Madrid, Spain; b Servicio de Microbiología,
Hospital Universitario Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; c Servicio de
Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Universitario Vall d’Hebron, PROSICS, Barcelona, Spain

doi:10.1016/j.eimc.2015.12.007

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The United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) 1951 Refugee Convention (July 28th) on the status of refugees defines a
refugee as a person who “owing to well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion, is outside the country of  his nationality and is unable or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to  avail himself of the protection of that country; or who, not having a nationality and being outside the country of his former habitual residence as a result of such events, is unable or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to return to it”.1

(…)

Keywords: Research; Abstracts; Migrants; Public Health.

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#Respiratory #diphtheria in an #asylum #seeker from #Afghanistan arriving to #Finland via #Sweden, December 2015 (@eurosurveillanc, abstract)

[Source: Eurosurveillance, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Eurosurveillance, Volume 21, Issue 2, 14 January 2016 / Rapid communication

Respiratory diphtheria in an asylum seeker from Afghanistan arriving to Finland via Sweden, December 2015 [      ]

J Sane 1, T Sorvari 1, M Wideström 2, H Kauma 3, U Kaukoniemi 4, E Tarkka 5, T Puumalainen 6, M Kuusi 1, M Salminen 1, O Lyytikäinen 1

Author affiliations: 1. Department of Infectious Diseases, Infectious Disease Control Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland 2. Department of Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden 3. Department of Internal Medicine, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland 4. Department of Infectious Diseases, Länsi-Pohja Central Hospital, Finland 5. Helsinki University Central Hospital, Hospital District of Helsinki and Uusimaa, Laboratory Services, HUSLAB, Finland 6. Department of Health Protection, Vaccination Programme Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland

Correspondence: Jussi Sane ( jussi.sane@thl.fi)

Citation style for this article: Sane J, Sorvari T, Wideström M, Kauma H, Kaukoniemi U, Tarkka E, Puumalainen T, Kuusi M, Salminen M, Lyytikäinen O. Respiratory diphtheria in an asylum seeker from Afghanistan arriving to Finland via Sweden, December 2015. Euro Surveill. 2016;21(2):pii=30105. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2016.21.2.30105

Received:15 December 2015; Accepted:13 January 2016

 

Abstract

In December 2015, an asylum seeker originating from Afghanistan was diagnosed with respiratory diphtheria in Finland. He arrived in Finland from Sweden where he had already been clinically suspected and tested for diphtheria. Corynebacterium diphtheriae was confirmed in Sweden and shown to be genotypically and phenotypically toxigenic. The event highlights the importance of early case detection, rapid communication within the country and internationally as well as preparedness plans of diphtheria antitoxin availability.

Keywords: Research; Abstracts; Migrants; Finland; Sweden; Diphteria.

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#Shigellosis in #refugees, #Austria, July to November 2015 (@eurosurveillanc, abstract)

[Source: Eurosurveillance, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Eurosurveillance, Volume 20, Issue 48, 03 December 2015  / Rapid communication

Shigellosis in refugees, Austria, July to November 2015 [      ]

I Lederer 1 , K Taus 1 , F Allerberger 1 , S Fenkart 1 , A Spina 1 , B Springer 1 , D Schmid 1

Author affiliations: 1. Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety (AGES), Vienna, Austria

Correspondence: Daniela Schmid ( daniela.schmid@ages.at)

Citation style for this article: Lederer I, Taus K, Allerberger F, Fenkart S, Spina A, Springer B, Schmid D. Shigellosis in refugees, Austria, July to November 2015. Euro Surveill. 2015;20(48):pii=30081. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2015.20.48.30081

Received:27 November 2015; Accepted:03 December 2015

 

Abstract

We report on a cluster of shigellosis including 21 cases in refugees and two in local residents who worked in refugee transit centres, detected in Austria in 2015, between calendar weeks 29 and 47. The species isolated from the cluster cases, including one mixed infection, were S. sonnei (n = 13), S. flexneri (n = 10) and S. boydii (n = 1). Eleven of 18 tested isolates were extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-positive, including five of six ciprofloxacin-resistant and three azithromycin-resistant isolates.

Keywords: Research; Abstracts; Austria; Shigellosis; Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Migrants.

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