#International #Funding for #Global Common #Goods for #Health: An Analysis Using the #Creditor Reporting System and G-FINDER Databases (Health Syst Reform, abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Health Syst Reform. 2019 Nov 11:1-16. doi: 10.1080/23288604.2019.1663646. [Epub ahead of print]

International Funding for Global Common Goods for Health: An Analysis Using the Creditor Reporting System and G-FINDER Databases.

Schäferhoff M1, Chodavadia P2, Martinez S1, McDade KK2, Fewer S3, Silva S4, Jamison D3, Yamey G2.

Author information: 1 Open Consultants, Berlin, Germany. 2 Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA. 3 Institute for Global Health Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. 4 Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.

 

Abstract

West Africa’s Ebola epidemic of 2014-2016 exposed, among other problems, the under-funding of transnational global health activities known as global common goods for health (CGH), global functions such as pandemic preparedness and research and development (R&D) for neglected diseases. To mobilize sustainable funding for global CGH, it is critical first to understand existing financing flowing to different types of global CGH. In this study, we estimate trends in international spending for global CGH in 2013, 2015, and 2017, encompassing the era before and after the Ebola epidemic. We use a measure of international funding that combines official development assistance (ODA) for health with additional international spending on R&D for diseases of poverty, a measure called ODA+. We classify ODA+ into funding for three global functions-provision of global public goods, management of cross-border externalities, and fostering of global health leadership and stewardship-and country-specific aid. International funding for global functions increased between 2013 and 2015 by $1.4 billion to a total of $7.3 billion in 2015. It then declined to $7.0 billion in 2017, accounting for 24% of all ODA+ in 2017. These findings provide empirical evidence of the reactive nature of international funders for global CGH. While international funders increased funding for global functions in response to the Ebola outbreak, they failed to sustain that funding. To meet future global health challenges proactively, international funders should allocate more funding for global functions.

KEYWORDS: global common goods for health; global health funding

PMID: 31710516 DOI: 10.1080/23288604.2019.1663646

Keywords: Global Health; International cooperation.

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Giuseppe Michieli

I am an Italian blogger, active since 2005 with main focus on emerging infectious diseases such as avian influenza, SARS, antibiotics resistance, and many other global Health issues. Other fields of interest are: climate change, global warming, geological and biological sciences. My activity consists mainly in collection and analysis of news, public services updates, confronting sources and making decision about what are the 'signals' of an impending crisis (an outbreak, for example). When a signal is detected, I follow traces during the entire course of an event. I started in 2005 my blog ''A TIME'S MEMORY'', now with more than 40,000 posts and 3 millions of web interactions. Subsequently I added an Italian Language blog, then discontinued because of very low traffic and interest. I contributed for seven years to a public forum (FluTrackers.com) in the midst of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014, I left the site to continue alone my data tracking job.