Transposable temperate #phages promote the #evolution of divergent social strategies in #Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations (Proc Roy Soc B., abstract)

[Source: Proceedings of the Royal Society, Biological Sciences, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Transposable temperate phages promote the evolution of divergent social strategies in Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations

Siobhán O’Brien, Rolf Kümmerli, Steve Paterson, Craig Winstanley and Michael A. Brockhurst

Published: 09 October 2019 / DOI: https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2019.1794

 

Abstract

Transposable temperate phages randomly insert into bacterial genomes, providing increased supply and altered spectra of mutations available to selection, thus opening alternative evolutionary trajectories. Transposable phages accelerate bacterial adaptation to new environments, but their effect on adaptation to the social environment is unclear. Using experimental evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in iron-limited and iron-rich environments, where the cost of producing cooperative iron-chelating siderophores is high and low, respectively, we show that transposable phages promote divergence into extreme siderophore production phenotypes. Iron-limited populations with transposable phages evolved siderophore overproducing clones alongside siderophore non-producing cheats. Low siderophore production was associated with parallel mutations in pvd genes, encoding pyoverdine biosynthesis, and pqs genes, encoding quinolone signalling, while high siderophore production was associated with parallel mutations in phenazine-associated gene clusters. Notably, some of these parallel mutations were caused by phage insertional inactivation. These data suggest that transposable phages, which are widespread in microbial communities, can mediate the evolutionary divergence of social strategies.

 

Footnotes

Electronic supplementary material is available online at https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.c.4674518

Keywords: Bacteriophages; Evolution; Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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Giuseppe Michieli

I am an Italian blogger, active since 2005 with main focus on emerging infectious diseases such as avian influenza, SARS, antibiotics resistance, and many other global Health issues. Other fields of interest are: climate change, global warming, geological and biological sciences. My activity consists mainly in collection and analysis of news, public services updates, confronting sources and making decision about what are the 'signals' of an impending crisis (an outbreak, for example). When a signal is detected, I follow traces during the entire course of an event. I started in 2005 my blog ''A TIME'S MEMORY'', now with more than 40,000 posts and 3 millions of web interactions. Subsequently I added an Italian Language blog, then discontinued because of very low traffic and interest. I contributed for seven years to a public forum (FluTrackers.com) in the midst of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014, I left the site to continue alone my data tracking job.