Where #backyard #poultry raisers seek care for sick poultry: implications for #avian #influenza #prevention in #Bangladesh (BMC Public Health, abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

BMC Public Health. 2018 Aug 3;18(1):969. doi: 10.1186/s12889-018-5819-5.

Where backyard poultry raisers seek care for sick poultry: implications for avian influenza prevention in Bangladesh.

Rimi NA1, Sultana R2,3, Ishtiak-Ahmed K2,4, Haider N2,5, Azziz-Baumgartner E6, Nahar N2, Luby SP2,6,7.

Author information: 1 Program for Emerging Infections (PEI), Infectious Diseases Division (IDD), icddr, b, 68, Shaheed Tajuddin Ahmed Sharani, Mohakhali, Dhaka, 1212, Bangladesh. nadiarimi@icddrb.org. 2 Program for Emerging Infections (PEI), Infectious Diseases Division (IDD), icddr, b, 68, Shaheed Tajuddin Ahmed Sharani, Mohakhali, Dhaka, 1212, Bangladesh. 3 Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. 4 University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. 5 Technical University of Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark. 6 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, GA, USA. 7 Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.

 

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In Bangladesh, backyard poultry raisers lack awareness of avian influenza and infrequently follow government recommendations for its prevention. Identifying where poultry raisers seek care for their ill poultry might help the government better plan how to disseminate avian influenza prevention and control recommendations.

METHODS:

In order to identify where backyard poultry raisers seek care for their ill poultry, we conducted in-depth and informal interviews: 70 with backyard poultry raisers and six with local poultry healthcare providers in two villages, and five with government veterinary professionals at the sub-district and union levels in two districts during June-August 2009.

RESULTS:

Most (86% [60/70]) raisers sought care for their backyard poultry locally, 14% used home remedies only and none sought care from government veterinary professionals. The local poultry care providers provided advice and medications (n = 6). Four local care providers had shops in the village market where raisers sought healthcare for their poultry and the remaining two visited rural households to provide poultry healthcare services. Five of the six local care providers did not have formal training in veterinary medicine. Local care providers either did not know about avian influenza or considered avian influenza to be a disease common among commercial but not backyard poultry. The government professionals had degrees in veterinary medicine and experience with avian influenza and its prevention. They had their offices at the sub-district or union level and lacked staffing to reach the backyard raisers at the village level.

CONCLUSIONS:

The local poultry care providers provided front line healthcare to backyard poultry in villages and were a potential source of information for the rural raisers. Integration of these local poultry care providers in the government’s avian influenza control programs is a potentially useful approach to increase poultry raisers’ and local poultry care providers’ awareness about avian influenza.

KEYWORDS: Avian influenza; Backyard poultry raiser; Bangladesh; Informal care provider, poultry care provider, poultry disease; Perception

PMID: 30075714 PMCID: PMC6090748 DOI: 10.1186/s12889-018-5819-5 [Indexed for MEDLINE] Free PMC Article

Keywords: Avian Influenza; Poultry; Human; Public Health; Bangladesh.

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Giuseppe Michieli

I am an Italian blogger, active since 2005 with main focus on emerging infectious diseases such as avian influenza, SARS, antibiotics resistance, and many other global Health issues. Other fields of interest are: climate change, global warming, geological and biological sciences. My activity consists mainly in collection and analysis of news, public services updates, confronting sources and making decision about what are the 'signals' of an impending crisis (an outbreak, for example). When a signal is detected, I follow traces during the entire course of an event. I started in 2005 my blog ''A TIME'S MEMORY'', now with more than 40,000 posts and 3 millions of web interactions. Subsequently I added an Italian Language blog, then discontinued because of very low traffic and interest. I contributed for seven years to a public forum (FluTrackers.com) in the midst of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014, I left the site to continue alone my data tracking job.