#Travel #Surveillance and #Genomics Uncover a Hidden #Zika #Outbreak during the Waning #Epidemic (Cell., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Cell. 2019 Aug 22;178(5):1057-1071.e11. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2019.07.018.

Travel Surveillance and Genomics Uncover a Hidden Zika Outbreak during the Waning Epidemic.

Grubaugh ND1, Saraf S2, Gangavarapu K2, Watts A3, Tan AL4, Oidtman RJ5, Ladner JT6, Oliveira G2, Matteson NL2, Kraemer MUG7, Vogels CBF8, Hentoff A8, Bhatia D3, Stanek D9, Scott B9, Landis V9, Stryker I10, Cone MR10, Kopp EW 4th10, Cannons AC10, Heberlein-Larson L10, White S11, Gillis LD11, Ricciardi MJ12, Kwal J12, Lichtenberger PK12, Magnani DM13, Watkins DI12, Palacios G14, Hamer DH15; GeoSentinel Surveillance Network, Gardner LM16, Perkins TA5, Baele G17, Khan K18, Morrison A9, Isern S19, Michael SF20, Andersen KG21.

Author information: 1 Department of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT 06510, USA; Department of Immunology and Microbiology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Electronic address: nathan.grubaugh@yale.edu. 2 Department of Immunology and Microbiology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. 3 Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON M5B 1T8, Canada. 4 Department of Biological Sciences, Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, FL 33965, USA; Bureau of Public Health Laboratories, Division of Disease Control and Health Protection, Florida Department of Health, Tampa, FL 33612, USA. 5 Department of Biological Sciences and Eck Institute for Global Health, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA. 6 Center for Genome Sciences, US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Fort Detrick, MD 21702, USA; Pathogen and Microbiome Institute, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ 86011, USA. 7 Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK; Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. 8 Department of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT 06510, USA. 9 Bureau of Epidemiology, Division of Disease Control and Health Protection, Florida Department of Health, Tallahassee, FL 32399, USA. 10 Bureau of Public Health Laboratories, Division of Disease Control and Health Protection, Florida Department of Health, Tampa, FL 33612, USA. 11 Bureau of Public Health Laboratories, Division of Disease Control and Health Protection, Florida Department of Health, Miami, FL 33125, USA. 12 Department of Pathology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA. 13 Department of Pathology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA; MassBiologics, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Boston, MA 02126, USA. 14 Center for Genome Sciences, US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Fort Detrick, MD 21702, USA. 15 Department of Global Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02118, USA; Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA 02118, USA. 16 School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia; Department of Civil Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. 17 Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Rega Institute, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. 18 Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON M5B 1T8, Canada; Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5B 1T8, Canada. 19 Department of Biological Sciences, Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, FL 33965, USA. 20 Department of Biological Sciences, Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, FL 33965, USA. Electronic address: smichael@fgcu.edu. 21 Department of Immunology and Microbiology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA; Scripps Research Translational Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Electronic address: andersen@scripps.edu.

 

Abstract

The Zika epidemic in the Americas has challenged surveillance and control. As the epidemic appears to be waning, it is unclear whether transmission is still ongoing, which is exacerbated by discrepancies in reporting. To uncover locations with lingering outbreaks, we investigated travel-associated Zika cases to identify transmission not captured by reporting. We uncovered an unreported outbreak in Cuba during 2017, a year after peak transmission in neighboring islands. By sequencing Zika virus, we show that the establishment of the virus was delayed by a year and that the ensuing outbreak was sparked by long-lived lineages of Zika virus from other Caribbean islands. Our data suggest that, although mosquito control in Cuba may initially have been effective at mitigating Zika virus transmission, such measures need to be maintained to be effective. Our study highlights how Zika virus may still be “silently” spreading and provides a framework for understanding outbreak dynamics.

Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS: Zika epidemic; Zika virus; clinical sequencing; genomic epidemiology; infectious disease genomics; phylogenetics; travel surveillance; virus sequencing

PMID: 31442400 DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2019.07.018

Keywords: Zika Virus; USA; Cuba; Caribbean.

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gimi69

I am an Italian blogger, active since 2005 with main focus on emerging infectious diseases such as avian influenza, SARS, antibiotics resistance, and many other global Health issues. Other fields of interest are: climate change, global warming, geological and biological sciences. My activity consists mainly in collection and analysis of news, public services updates, confronting sources and making decision about what are the 'signals' of an impending crisis (an outbreak, for example). When a signal is detected, I follow traces during the entire course of an event. I started in 2005 my blog ''A TIME'S MEMORY'', now with more than 40,000 posts and 3 millions of web interactions. Subsequently I added an Italian Language blog, then discontinued because of very low traffic and interest. I contributed for seven years to a public forum (FluTrackers.com) in the midst of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014, I left the site to continue alone my data tracking job.

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