Comparison of #Serologic #Assays for #MERS #Coronavirus (Emerg Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Volume 25, Number 10—October 2019 / Research

Comparison of Serologic Assays for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

Ruth Harvey, Giada Mattiuzzo  , Mark Hassall, Andrea Sieberg, Marcel A. Müller, Christian Drosten, Peter Rigsby, Christopher J. Oxenford, and study participants

Author affiliations: National Institute for Biological Standards and Control—MHRA, Potters Bar, UK (R. Harvey, G. Mattiuzzo, M. Hassall, P. Rigsby); Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany (A. Sieberg, M.A. Müller, C. Drosten); Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin (A. Sieberg, M.A. Müller, C. Drosten); Berlin Institute of Health, Berlin (A. Sieberg, M.A. Müller, C. Drosten); German Centre for Infection Research, Berlin (M.A. Müller, C. Drosten); World Health Organization, Lyon, France (C.J. Oxenford).

 

Abstract

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was detected in humans in 2012. Since then, sporadic outbreaks with primary transmission through dromedary camels to humans and outbreaks in healthcare settings have shown that MERS-CoV continues to pose a threat to human health. Several serologic assays for MERS-CoV have been developed globally. We describe a collaborative study to investigate the comparability of serologic assays for MERS-CoV and assess any benefit associated with the introduction of a standard reference reagent for MERS-CoV serology. Our study findings indicate that, when possible, laboratories should use a testing algorithm including >2 tests to ensure correct diagnosis of MERS-CoV. We also demonstrate that the use of a reference reagent greatly improves the agreement between assays, enabling more consistent and therefore more meaningful comparisons between results.

Keywords: MERS-CoV; Serology; Diagnostic tests.

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Giuseppe Michieli

I am an Italian blogger, active since 2005 with main focus on emerging infectious diseases such as avian influenza, SARS, antibiotics resistance, and many other global Health issues. Other fields of interest are: climate change, global warming, geological and biological sciences. My activity consists mainly in collection and analysis of news, public services updates, confronting sources and making decision about what are the 'signals' of an impending crisis (an outbreak, for example). When a signal is detected, I follow traces during the entire course of an event. I started in 2005 my blog ''A TIME'S MEMORY'', now with more than 40,000 posts and 3 millions of web interactions. Subsequently I added an Italian Language blog, then discontinued because of very low traffic and interest. I contributed for seven years to a public forum (FluTrackers.com) in the midst of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014, I left the site to continue alone my data tracking job.