#Avian #Influenza #H5N6 Viruses Exhibit Differing #Pathogenicities and #Transmissibilities in #Mammals (Sci Rep., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Sci Rep. 2017 Nov 24;7(1):16280. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-16139-1.

Avian Influenza H5N6 Viruses Exhibit Differing Pathogenicities and Transmissibilities in Mammals.

Zhao Z1, Guo Z1, Zhang C1, Liu L1, Chen L2, Zhang C2, Wang Z1, Fu Y1, Li J1, Shao H3, Luo Q4, Qian J5, Liu L6.

Author information: 1 Institute of Military Veterinary, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, 666 West Liuying Road, Changchun, 130122, Jilin, China. 2 College of Veterinary Medicine, Hebei Agricultural University, 2596 lucky south street, Baoding, 071000, Hebei, China. 3 Key Laboratory of Prevention and Control Agents for Animal Bacteriosis, Institute of Animal Husbandry and Veterinary, Hubei Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Wuhan, China. 4 Key Laboratory of Prevention and Control Agents for Animal Bacteriosis, Institute of Animal Husbandry and Veterinary, Hubei Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Wuhan, China. qingping0523@163.com. 5 Institute of Military Veterinary, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, 666 West Liuying Road, Changchun, 130122, Jilin, China. qianj1970@126.com. 6 Institute of Military Veterinary, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, 666 West Liuying Road, Changchun, 130122, Jilin, China. liulinna7@126.com.

Erratum in Author Correction: Avian Influenza H5N6 Viruses Exhibit Differing Pathogenicities and Transmissibilities in Mammals. [Sci Rep. 2018]

 

Abstract

Since 2013, highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N6 viruses have emerged in poultry and caused sporadic infections in humans, increasing global concerns regarding their potential as human pandemic threats. Here, we characterized the receptor-binding specificities, pathogenicities and transmissibilities of three H5N6 viruses isolated from poultry in China. The surface genes hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) were closely related to the human-originating strain A/Changsha/1/2014 (H5N6). Phylogenetic analyses showed that the HA genes were clustered in the 2.3.4.4 clade, and the NA genes were derived from H6N6 viruses. These H5N6 viruses bound both α-2,3-linked and α-2,6-linked sialic acid receptors, but they exhibited different pathogenicities in mice. In addition, one virus was fully infective and transmissible by direct contact in guinea pigs. These results highlight the importance of monitoring the continual adaptation of H5N6 viruses in poultry due to their potential threat to human health.

PMID: 29176564 PMCID: PMC5701206 DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-16139-1 [Indexed for MEDLINE]  Free PMC Article

Keywords: Avian Influenza; H5N6; H6N6; Reassortant strain; Poultry; Human; Animal models.

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gimi69

I am an Italian blogger, active since 2005 with main focus on emerging infectious diseases such as avian influenza, SARS, antibiotics resistance, and many other global Health issues. Other fields of interest are: climate change, global warming, geological and biological sciences. My activity consists mainly in collection and analysis of news, public services updates, confronting sources and making decision about what are the 'signals' of an impending crisis (an outbreak, for example). When a signal is detected, I follow traces during the entire course of an event. I started in 2005 my blog ''A TIME'S MEMORY'', now with more than 40,000 posts and 3 millions of web interactions. Subsequently I added an Italian Language blog, then discontinued because of very low traffic and interest. I contributed for seven years to a public forum (FluTrackers.com) in the midst of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014, I left the site to continue alone my data tracking job.

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