Detection of #Antibody and #Antigen for #Lassa Virus #Nucleoprotein in #Monkeys from Southern #Nigeria (J Epidemiol Glob Health., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

J Epidemiol Glob Health. 2019 Jun;9(2):125-127. doi: 10.2991/jegh.k.190421.001.

Detection of Antibody and Antigen for Lassa Virus Nucleoprotein in Monkeys from Southern Nigeria.

Ogunro BN1,2,3, Olugasa BO2,3, Kayode A4,5, Ishola OO3, Kolawole ON2, Odigie EA6, Happi C4.

Author information: 1 Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria. 2 Centre for Control and Prevention of Zoonoses, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria. 3 Department of Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria. 4 African Center for Excellence in Genomics of Infectious Diseases (ACEGID), Redeemer’s University, Ede, Osun State, Nigeria. 5 Department of Biological Sciences, Redeemer’s University, Ede, Osun State, Nigeria. 6 Department of Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Benin, Edo State, Nigeria.

 

Abstract

Lassa fever is a deadly viral haemorrhagic fever caused by Lassa Virus (LASV). Rodents, especially, Mystomys natalensis, are the known reservoirs of LASV and humans are the defined hosts. Monkeys share many illnesses with humans and experimental LASV infections in monkeys are fatal but natural LASV infection of monkeys has not been reported. Serum samples obtained between August 2015 and December 2017 from 62 monkeys belonging to six species in Southern Nigeria were tested for LASV as part of an ongoing surveillance of monkeys in the region for zoonotic pathogens. Commercially available Recombinant LASV (ReLASV) Pan-Lassa enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test kits (Zalgen Labs, Germantown, MD, USA) were used to detect antibodies (IgG and IgM) and antigen specific for LASV nucleoprotein in the sera. Lassa-fever-specific IgG and IgM, and antigen specific for LASV nucleoprotein were detected in 5/62, 0/62, and 1/62 samples, respectively. The presence of LASV-specific antibodies in the sera suggests natural exposure to the virus, while the presence of LASV antigen may mean that monkeys are carriers of the virus. There is a need to broaden Lassa fever surveillance to include nonhuman primates (NHPs) for their probable role in the epidemiology of the disease.

© 2019 Atlantis Press International B.V.

KEYWORDS: ELISA; Lassa fever virus; monkeys; sylvatic cycle

PMID: 31241870 DOI: 10.2991/jegh.k.190421.001

Keywords: Lassa fever; Serology; Wildlife; Nigeria.

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gimi69

I am an Italian blogger, active since 2005 with main focus on emerging infectious diseases such as avian influenza, SARS, antibiotics resistance, and many other global Health issues. Other fields of interest are: climate change, global warming, geological and biological sciences. My activity consists mainly in collection and analysis of news, public services updates, confronting sources and making decision about what are the 'signals' of an impending crisis (an outbreak, for example). When a signal is detected, I follow traces during the entire course of an event. I started in 2005 my blog ''A TIME'S MEMORY'', now with more than 40,000 posts and 3 millions of web interactions. Subsequently I added an Italian Language blog, then discontinued because of very low traffic and interest. I contributed for seven years to a public forum (FluTrackers.com) in the midst of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014, I left the site to continue alone my data tracking job.

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