#Phylogeography and #invasion history of #Aedes aegypti, the #Dengue and #Zika mosquito #vector in #CapeVerde islands (West Africa) (Evol Appl., abstract)

[Source: Evolutionary Applications, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

ORIGINAL ARTICLE  | Open Access

Phylogeography and invasion history of Aedes aegypti, the Dengue and Zika mosquito vector in Cape Verde islands (West Africa)

Patrícia Salgueiro,  Célia Serrano,  Bruno Gomes,  Joana Alves,  Carla A. Sousa,  Ana Abecasis, João Pinto

First published: 20 June 2019 / DOI:  https://doi.org/10.1111/eva.12834

This article has been accepted for publication and undergone full peer review but has not been through the copyediting, typesetting, pagination and proofreading process, which may lead to differences between this version and the Version of Record. Please cite this article as doi:10.1111/eva.12834

 

Abstract

Aedes‐borne arboviruses have spread globally with outbreaks of vast impact on human populations and health systems. The West African archipelago of Cape Verde had its first outbreak of Dengue in 2009, at the time the largest recorded in Africa, and was one of the few African countries affected by the Zika virus epidemic. Aedes aegypti was the mosquito vector involved in both outbreaks. We performed a phylogeographic and population genetics study of A. aegypti in Cape Verde in order to infer the geographic origin and evolutionary history of this mosquito. These results are discussed with respect to the implications for vector control and prevention of future outbreaks. Mosquitoes captured before and after the Dengue outbreak on the islands of Santiago, Brava and Fogo were analyzed with two mitochondrial genes COI and ND4, 14 microsatellite loci and five kdr mutations. Genetic variability was comparable to other African populations. Our results suggest that A. aegypti invaded Cape Verde at the beginning of the Holocene from West Africa. Given the historic importance of Cape Verde in the transatlantic trade of the 16th –17th centuries, a possible contribution to the genetic pool of the founding populations in the New World cannot be fully discarded. However, contemporary gene flow with the Americas is likely to be infrequent. No kdr mutations associated with pyrethroid resistance were detected. The implications for vector control and prevention of future outbreaks are discussed.

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Keywords: Mosquitoes: Arbovirus; Zika virus; Dengue Fever; Cape Verde; Evolution; Aedes aegypti.

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Giuseppe Michieli

I am an Italian blogger, active since 2005 with main focus on emerging infectious diseases such as avian influenza, SARS, antibiotics resistance, and many other global Health issues. Other fields of interest are: climate change, global warming, geological and biological sciences. My activity consists mainly in collection and analysis of news, public services updates, confronting sources and making decision about what are the 'signals' of an impending crisis (an outbreak, for example). When a signal is detected, I follow traces during the entire course of an event. I started in 2005 my blog ''A TIME'S MEMORY'', now with more than 40,000 posts and 3 millions of web interactions. Subsequently I added an Italian Language blog, then discontinued because of very low traffic and interest. I contributed for seven years to a public forum (FluTrackers.com) in the midst of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014, I left the site to continue alone my data tracking job.