#Inflammatory and #Humoral Immune Response during #Ebola Virus #Infection in #Survivor and #Fatal Cases Occurred in #SierraLeone during the 2014⁻2016 #Outbreak in West Africa (Viruses, abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Viruses. 2019 Apr 23;11(4). pii: E373. doi: 10.3390/v11040373.

Inflammatory and Humoral Immune Response during Ebola Virus Infection in Survivor and Fatal Cases Occurred in Sierra Leone during the 2014⁻2016 Outbreak in West Africa.

Colavita F1, Biava M2, Castilletti C3, Lanini S4, Miccio R5, Portella G6, Vairo F7, Ippolito G8, Capobianchi MR9, Di Caro A10, Lalle E11.

Author information: 1 National Institute for Infectious Diseases “L. Spallanzani”, IRCCS, Via Portuense 292, 00149 Rome, Italy. francesca.colavita@inmi.it. 2 National Institute for Infectious Diseases “L. Spallanzani”, IRCCS, Via Portuense 292, 00149 Rome, Italy. mirella.biava@inmi.it. 3 National Institute for Infectious Diseases “L. Spallanzani”, IRCCS, Via Portuense 292, 00149 Rome, Italy. concetta.castilletti@inmi.it. 4 National Institute for Infectious Diseases “L. Spallanzani”, IRCCS, Via Portuense 292, 00149 Rome, Italy. simone.lanini@inmi.it. 5 EMERGENCY-NGO, Via Santa Croce 19, 20122 Milan, Italy. rossella.miccio@emergency.it. 6 EMERGENCY-NGO, Via Santa Croce 19, 20122 Milan, Italy. gina.portella@emergency.it. 7 National Institute for Infectious Diseases “L. Spallanzani”, IRCCS, Via Portuense 292, 00149 Rome, Italy. francesco.vairo@inmi.it. 8 National Institute for Infectious Diseases “L. Spallanzani”, IRCCS, Via Portuense 292, 00149 Rome, Italy. giuseppe.ippolito@inmi.it. 9 National Institute for Infectious Diseases “L. Spallanzani”, IRCCS, Via Portuense 292, 00149 Rome, Italy. maria.capobianchi@inmi.it. 10 National Institute for Infectious Diseases “L. Spallanzani”, IRCCS, Via Portuense 292, 00149 Rome, Italy. antonino.dicaro@inmi.it. 11 National Institute for Infectious Diseases “L. Spallanzani”, IRCCS, Via Portuense 292, 00149 Rome, Italy. eleonora.lalle@inmi.it.

 

Abstract

Ebola virus (EBOV) infection is characterized by an excessive inflammatory response, a loss of lymphocytes and a general paralysis of the immune system, however pathophysiological mechanisms are not fully understood. In a cohort of 23 fatal and 21 survivors of ebola virus disease (EVD) cases admitted to the Emergency Ebola-Treatment-Center in Goderich (Freetown, Sierra Leone) during the 2014 to 2016 EBOV epidemic in Western Africa, we analyzed the pathway-focused gene expression profile of secreted proteins involved in the immune response and the levels of specific anti-EBOV IgM and IgG from the time of admission till discharge or death. We observed a dysregulated inflammatory response in fatal patients as compared to survivors, mainly consisting of the upregulation of inflammatory mediators, whose extent directly correlated with viremia levels. The upregulation persisted and intensified during the late phase of infection. Relevant differences were also found in humoral immunity, as an earlier and more robust EBOV antibody response was observed in survivor patients.

KEYWORDS: antibody; cytokines; ebola virus; immune response; inflammation; sierra leone

PMID: 31018522 DOI: 10.3390/v11040373

Keywords: Ebola; Ebola-Makona; Sierra Leone; Immunopathology.

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Giuseppe Michieli

I am an Italian blogger, active since 2005 with main focus on emerging infectious diseases such as avian influenza, SARS, antibiotics resistance, and many other global Health issues. Other fields of interest are: climate change, global warming, geological and biological sciences. My activity consists mainly in collection and analysis of news, public services updates, confronting sources and making decision about what are the 'signals' of an impending crisis (an outbreak, for example). When a signal is detected, I follow traces during the entire course of an event. I started in 2005 my blog ''A TIME'S MEMORY'', now with more than 40,000 posts and 3 millions of web interactions. Subsequently I added an Italian Language blog, then discontinued because of very low traffic and interest. I contributed for seven years to a public forum (FluTrackers.com) in the midst of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014, I left the site to continue alone my data tracking job.