The use of #aminoglycosides in #animals within the #EU: development of #resistance in animals and possible #impact on #human and animal #health: a review (J Antimicrob Chemother., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

The use of aminoglycosides in animals within the EU: development of resistance in animals and possible impact on human and animal health: a review

Engeline van Duijkeren, Christine Schwarz, Damien Bouchard, Boudewijn Catry, Constança Pomba, Keith Edward Baptiste, Miguel A Moreno, Merja Rantala, Modestas Ružauskas, Pascal Sanders, Christopher Teale, Astrid L Wester, Kristine Ignate, Zoltan Kunsagi, Helen Jukes

Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, dkz161, https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkz161

Published: 19 April 2019

 

Abstract

Aminoglycosides (AGs) are important antibacterial agents for the treatment of various infections in humans and animals. Following extensive use of AGs in humans, food-producing animals and companion animals, acquired resistance among human and animal pathogens and commensal bacteria has emerged. Acquired resistance occurs through several mechanisms, but enzymatic inactivation of AGs is the most common one. Resistance genes are often located on mobile genetic elements, facilitating their spread between different bacterial species and between animals and humans. AG resistance has been found in many different bacterial species, including those with zoonotic potential such as Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp. and livestock-associated MRSA. The highest risk is anticipated from transfer of resistant enterococci or coliforms (Escherichia coli) since infections with these pathogens in humans would potentially be treated with AGs. There is evidence that the use of AGs in human and veterinary medicine is associated with the increased prevalence of resistance. The same resistance genes have been found in isolates from humans and animals. Evaluation of risk factors indicates that the probability of transmission of AG resistance from animals to humans through transfer of zoonotic or commensal foodborne bacteria and/or their mobile genetic elements can be regarded as high, although there are no quantitative data on the actual contribution of animals to AG resistance in human pathogens. Responsible use of AGs is of great importance in order to safeguard their clinical efficacy for human and veterinary medicine.

Issue Section: Review

© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model)

Keywords: Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Aminoglycosides; Food safety.

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gimi69

I am an Italian blogger, active since 2005 with main focus on emerging infectious diseases such as avian influenza, SARS, antibiotics resistance, and many other global Health issues. Other fields of interest are: climate change, global warming, geological and biological sciences. My activity consists mainly in collection and analysis of news, public services updates, confronting sources and making decision about what are the 'signals' of an impending crisis (an outbreak, for example). When a signal is detected, I follow traces during the entire course of an event. I started in 2005 my blog ''A TIME'S MEMORY'', now with more than 40,000 posts and 3 millions of web interactions. Subsequently I added an Italian Language blog, then discontinued because of very low traffic and interest. I contributed for seven years to a public forum (FluTrackers.com) in the midst of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014, I left the site to continue alone my data tracking job.

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