#Arboviral #diseases and #malaria in #Australia, 2014–15: Annual report of the National Arbovirus and Malaria Advisory Committee (Commun Dis Intell (2018), abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Commun Dis Intell (2018). 2019 Apr 15;43. doi: 10.33321/cdi.2019.43.14.

Arboviral diseases and malaria in Australia, 2014–15: Annual report of the National Arbovirus and Malaria Advisory Committee

Knope K1, Doggett SL2, Jansen CC3, Johansen CA4,5, Kurucz N6, Feldman R7, Lynch SE8, Hobby MP9, Sly A10, Jardine A11, Bennett S3, Currie BJ12, the National Arbovirus and Malaria Advisory Committee.

Author information: 1 Zoonoses, Foodborne and Emerging Infectious Diseases Section, Health Protection Policy Branch, Office of Health Protection, Department of Health, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory; 2 Department of Medical Entomology, Pathology West, Institute for Clinical Pathology and Medical Research, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, New South Wales; 3 Communicable Diseases Branch, Department of Health, Queensland Government, Herston, Qld 4006; 4 Arbovirus Surveillance and Research Laboratory, School of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia. 5
As of July 2015: Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, PathWest Laboratory Medicine WA, QEII Medical Centre, Western Australian Department of Health, Nedlands, Western Australia. 6 Medical Entomology, Centre for Disease Control, Health Protection Division, Northern Territory Department of Health, Royal Darwin Hospital, Casuarina, Northern Territory; 7 Communicable Disease Prevention and Control, Department of Health, Melbourne, Victoria; 8 Agriculture Victoria Research, AgriBio Centre for AgriBioscience, 5 Ring Road, Bundoora, Victoria, 3083, Australia; 9 Health Protection, Public Health, South Australian Department of Health, Adelaide, South Australia; 10 Department of Agriculture and Water Resources, Compliance Division, Eagle Farm, Queensland; 11 Medical Entomology, Environmental Health Directorate, Department of Health, Western Australia; 12 Royal Darwin Hospital Northern Territory; Menzies School of Health Research, Darwin, Northern Territory

 

Abstract

This report describes the epidemiology of mosquito-borne diseases of public health importance in Australia during the 2014–15 season (1 July 2014 to 30 June 2015) and includes data from human notifications, sentinel chicken, vector and virus surveillance programs. The National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System received notifications for 12,849 cases of disease transmitted by mosquitoes during the 2014–15 season. The Australasian alphaviruses Barmah Forest virus and Ross River virus accounted for 83% (n=10,723) of notifications. However, over-diagnosis and possible false positive diagnostic test results for these two infections mean that the true burden of infection is likely overestimated, and as a consequence, revised case definitions were implemented from 1 January 2016. There were 151 notifications of imported chikungunya virus infection. There were 74 notifications of dengue virus infection acquired in Australia and 1,592 cases acquired overseas, with an additional 34 cases for which the place of acquisition was unknown. Imported cases of dengue were most frequently acquired in Indonesia (66%). There were 7 notifications of Zika virus infection. No cases of locally-acquired malaria were notified during the 2014–15 season, though there were 259 notifications of overseas-acquired malaria and one notification for which no information on the place of acquisition was supplied. Imported cases of malaria were most frequently acquired in southern and eastern Africa (23%) and Pacific Island countries (20%). In 2014–15, arbovirus and mosquito surveillance programs were conducted in most of the states and territories. Surveillance for exotic mosquitoes at international ports of entry continues to be a vital part of preventing the establishment of vectors of mosquito-borne diseases such as dengue to new areas of Australia. In 2014-15, there was a sharp increase in the number of exotic mosquitoes detected at the Australian border, with 36 separate exotic mosquito detections made, representing a 280% increase from the 2013-14 period where there were 13 exotic mosquito detections.

KEYWORDS: arbovirus; Barmah Forest virus; chikungunya; dengue; Zika; disease surveillance; epidemiology; flavivirus; Japanese encephalitis; West Nile virus; Kunjin virus; malaria; mosquito-borne disease; mosquitoes; Murray Valley encephalitis virus; Ross River virus; yellow fever; exotic mosquitoes

PMID: 30982295

Keywords: Arbovirus; Alphavirus; Flaviviru; Barmah forest virus; Chikungunya fever; Zika virus; WNV; Malaria; Australia.

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gimi69

I am an Italian blogger, active since 2005 with main focus on emerging infectious diseases such as avian influenza, SARS, antibiotics resistance, and many other global Health issues. Other fields of interest are: climate change, global warming, geological and biological sciences. My activity consists mainly in collection and analysis of news, public services updates, confronting sources and making decision about what are the 'signals' of an impending crisis (an outbreak, for example). When a signal is detected, I follow traces during the entire course of an event. I started in 2005 my blog ''A TIME'S MEMORY'', now with more than 40,000 posts and 3 millions of web interactions. Subsequently I added an Italian Language blog, then discontinued because of very low traffic and interest. I contributed for seven years to a public forum (FluTrackers.com) in the midst of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014, I left the site to continue alone my data tracking job.

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