#Human #Metapneumovirus in #Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (P #ICU) Admissions in the United Kingdom (#UK) 2006-2014 (J Clin Virol., abstract)

[Source: Journal of Clinical Virology, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Journal of Clinical Virology / Available online 16 January 2019 / In Press, Accepted Manuscript

Human Metapneumovirus in Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) Admissions in the United Kingdom (UK) 2006-2014

Rachael Barra d, Rachel McGalliard a, Simon B Drysdale a,b,c,

{a} Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Children’s Hospital, Headley Way, Oxford, OX3 9DU, United Kingdom; {b} Oxford Vaccine Group, Department of Paediatrics, University of Oxford, OX3 9DU, United Kingdom; {c} NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre, Level 2, Children’s Hospital, Oxford, OX3 9DU, United Kingdom; {d} Taunton and Somerset NHS Foundation Trust, Children’s Hospital, Parkfield Drive, Taunton, TA1 5DA, United Kingdom

Received 29 September 2018, Revised 27 November 2018, Accepted 15 January 2019, Available online 16 January 2019.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2019.01.006

 

Highlights

  • The number of cases per month were highest from November to May
  • A respiratory-based primary diagnosis was the most common
  • Requirements included ventilation, inotropes, renal replacement and ECMO
  • Mean (SD) mortality risk was 4.8 (6.4)%, with a median (range) of 2.7 (0.2 – 39.1)%
  • The total cost of PICU admissions was estimated to be £2,256,823 – £3,997,823

 

Abstract

Background

Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a pneumovirus known to cause respiratory disease in children. It was identified as a pathogen in 2001 and its healthcare burden and associated costs are not fully understood.

Objectives

This study aimed to assess the clinical characteristics of children with HMPV infection admitted to paediatric intensive care units (PICUs) across the United Kingdom (UK) over a nine-year period and to estimate the associated costs of care.

Study Design

Data were collected from the UK paediatric intensive care audit network (PICANet) and costs calculated using the National Health Service (NHS) reference costing scheme.

Results

There were 114 admissions in which HMPV was detected. The number of admissions associated with a code of HMPV rose steadily over the study period (three in 2006 to 28 in 2014) and showed significant seasonal variability, with the peak season being from November to May. Children required varying levels of intensive care support from minimal to complex support including invasive ventilation, inotropes, renal replacement therapy and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). HMPV was associated with five deaths during the study period. The associated costs of PICU admissions were estimated to be between £2,256,823 and £3,997,823 over the study period, with estimated annual costs rising over the study period due to increasing HMPV admissions.

Conclusions

HMPV is associated with a significant healthcare burden and associated cost of care in PICUs in the UK.

Keywords: Human Metapneumovirus – Intensive Care – PICU – Cost

© 2019 Published by Elsevier B.V.

Keywords: Metapneumovirus; SARI; UK.

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Giuseppe Michieli

I am an Italian blogger, active since 2005 with main focus on emerging infectious diseases such as avian influenza, SARS, antibiotics resistance, and many other global Health issues. Other fields of interest are: climate change, global warming, geological and biological sciences. My activity consists mainly in collection and analysis of news, public services updates, confronting sources and making decision about what are the 'signals' of an impending crisis (an outbreak, for example). When a signal is detected, I follow traces during the entire course of an event. I started in 2005 my blog ''A TIME'S MEMORY'', now with more than 40,000 posts and 3 millions of web interactions. Subsequently I added an Italian Language blog, then discontinued because of very low traffic and interest. I contributed for seven years to a public forum (FluTrackers.com) in the midst of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014, I left the site to continue alone my data tracking job.