1818, 1918, 2018: Two #Centuries of #Pandemics (Health Secur., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Health Secur. 2018 Dec 4. doi: 10.1089/hs.2018.0083. [Epub ahead of print]

1818, 1918, 2018: Two Centuries of Pandemics.

Snyder MR1,2, Ravi SJ1,2.

Author information: 1 Michael R. Snyder, MALD, is an Analyst, and Sanjana J. Ravi, MPH, is a Senior Analyst, both at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security. 2 Both are Research Associates at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.

 

Abstract

2018 marks the centennial of the 1918 influenza pandemic, widely acknowledged as one of the deadliest infectious disease crises in human history. As public health and medical communities of practice reflect on the aftermath of the influenza pandemic and the ways in which it has altered the trajectory of history and informed current practices in health security, it is worth noting that the Spanish flu was preceded by a very different 100-year threat: the first Asiatic cholera pandemic of 1817 to 1824. In this commentary, we offer a historical analysis of the common socioeconomic, political, and environmental factors underlying both pandemics, consider the roles of cholera and Spanish flu in shaping global health norms and modern public health practices, and examine how strategic applications of soft power and broadening the focus of health security to include sustainable development could help the world prepare for pandemics of the future.

PMID: 30511884 DOI: 10.1089/hs.2018.0083

Keywords: Pandemics; Pandemic preparedness; Influenza A; Cholera; Society.

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Giuseppe Michieli

I am an Italian blogger, active since 2005 with main focus on emerging infectious diseases such as avian influenza, SARS, antibiotics resistance, and many other global Health issues. Other fields of interest are: climate change, global warming, geological and biological sciences. My activity consists mainly in collection and analysis of news, public services updates, confronting sources and making decision about what are the 'signals' of an impending crisis (an outbreak, for example). When a signal is detected, I follow traces during the entire course of an event. I started in 2005 my blog ''A TIME'S MEMORY'', now with more than 40,000 posts and 3 millions of web interactions. Subsequently I added an Italian Language blog, then discontinued because of very low traffic and interest. I contributed for seven years to a public forum (FluTrackers.com) in the midst of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014, I left the site to continue alone my data tracking job.