#Surveillance of #enteroviruses from #paediatric patients attended at a tertiary #hospital in #Catalonia from 2014 to 2017 (J Clin Virol., abstract)

[Source: Science Direct, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Journal of Clinical Virology / Available online 30 November 2018 / In Press, Accepted Manuscript

Surveillance of enteroviruses from paediatric patients attended at a tertiary hospital in Catalonia from 2014 to 2017

Cristina Andrés a, Jorgina Vila b, Laura Gimferrer a , Maria Piñana a, Juliana Esperalba a, Maria Gema Codina a, Meritxell Barnés b, Mariadel Carmen Martín a, Francisco Fuentes a, Susana Rubio a, Pilar Alcubilla a, Carlos Rodrigo b, Tomàs Pumarola a, Andrés Antón a

{a} Respiratory Viruses Unit, Virology Section, Microbiology Department, Hospital Universitari Vall d’Hebron, Vall d’Hebron Research Institute, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; {b} Paediatric Hospitalisation Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Hospital Universitari Maternoinfantil Vall d’Hebron, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain

Received 4 September 2018, Revised 26 October 2018, Accepted 16 November 2018, Available online 30 November 2018.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2018.11.004

 

Highlights

  • The study reports virological and clinical enterovirus surveillance in Catalonia.
  • The four enterovirus species cocirculated, distinguishing up to 27 different types.
  • Most of neurological studied cases were from the 2016 spring outbreak.
  • EV-A71 was one of the most detected EV, mostly during the outbreak.
  • Rhombencephalitis cases were related to EV-A71 infection.
  • EV-D68 was associated with lower respiratory tract infections.
  • Necessity to perform EV surveillance in primary care settings.

 

Abstract

Background

Enterovirus (EV) infections are usually asymptomatic or mild, but symptomatic infections can evolve to severe complications. Outbreaks of EV-A71 and EV-D68 have been recently reported worldwide, sometimes related to severe clinical outcomes.

Objective

To describe EV genetic diversity and the clinical outcomes from paediatric patients attended at a tertiary university hospital in Barcelona (Catalonia, Spain) from 2014 to 2017.

Study design

Specimens were collected from paediatric (<17 years old) cases with suspicion of respiratory tract infection or EV infection. EV laboratory-confirmation was performed by specific real-time multiplex RT-PCR assay. Partial viral VP1 protein was sequenced for genetic characterisation by phylogenetic analyses.

Results

A total of 376 (7%) from 5,703 cases were EV laboratory-confirmed. Phylogenetic analyses of VP1 (210; 81%) sequences distinguished up to 27 different EV types distributed within EV-A (82; 40%), EV-B (90; 42%), EV-C (5; 2%), and EV-D (33; 15%), in addition to 50 (19%) rhinoviruses. The most predominant were EV-A71 (37; 45%) and EV-D68 (32; 99%). EV-A71 was highly related to neurological complications (25/39, 63%), of which 20/39 were rhombencephalitis, and most EV-D68 (28/32, 88%) were associated with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI), and exceptionally one (3%) with flaccid paralysis.

Conclusions

EV-A71 and EV-D68 were the most detected EV in respiratory specimens. EV-A71 was highly related to neurological disease and EV-D68 was often associated with LRTI. However, both potential relatedness to neurological diseases makes the monitoring of EV circulation obligatory.

Keywords: enteroviruses – respiratory infections – surveillance – genetic diversity – molecular epidemiology – paediatric population

© 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Keywords: Enterovirus; EV-A71; EV-D68; Rhomboencephalitis; AFP; Spain.

—–

Advertisements

Published by

gimi69

I am an Italian blogger, active since 2005 with main focus on emerging infectious diseases such as avian influenza, SARS, antibiotics resistance, and many other global Health issues. Other fields of interest are: climate change, global warming, geological and biological sciences. My activity consists mainly in collection and analysis of news, public services updates, confronting sources and making decision about what are the 'signals' of an impending crisis (an outbreak, for example). When a signal is detected, I follow traces during the entire course of an event. I started in 2005 my blog ''A TIME'S MEMORY'', now with more than 40,000 posts and 3 millions of web interactions. Subsequently I added an Italian Language blog, then discontinued because of very low traffic and interest. I contributed for seven years to a public forum (FluTrackers.com) in the midst of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014, I left the site to continue alone my data tracking job.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s