#Threats of #Zika virus #transmission for #Asia and its Hindu-Kush #Himalayan region (Infect Dis Poverty., abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Infect Dis Poverty. 2018 May 15;7(1):40. doi: 10.1186/s40249-018-0426-3.

Threats of Zika virus transmission for Asia and its Hindu-Kush Himalayan region.

Dhimal M1,2, Dahal S3, Dhimal ML4,5, Mishra SR6, Karki KB3, Aryal KK3, Haque U7, Kabir MI8, Guin P9,10, Butt AM11, Harapan H12, Liu QY13, Chu C14, Montag D15, Groneberg DA4, Pandey BD16, Kuch U4, Müller R4.

Author information: 1 Nepal Health Research Council (NHRC), Ramshah Path, Kathmandu, Nepal. meghdhimal@gmail.com. 2 Institute of Occupational Medicine, Social Medicine and Environmental Medicine, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main, Germany. meghdhimal@gmail.com. 3 Nepal Health Research Council (NHRC), Ramshah Path, Kathmandu, Nepal. 4 Institute of Occupational Medicine, Social Medicine and Environmental Medicine, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 5 Faculty of Social Sciences, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 6 The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. 7 Department of Public Health, Baldwin Wallace University, Berea, Ohio, USA. 8 Department of Epidemiology, National Institute of Preventive and Social Medicine, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Dhaka, Bangladesh. 9 Public Health Foundation of India, Gurgaon, Haryana, India. 10 Centre for Environmental Health, Gurgaon, Haryana, India. 11 Translational Genomics Laboratory, Department of Biosciences, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Islamabad, 45550, Pakistan. 12 Medical Research Unit, School of Medicine, Syiah Kuala University, Banda Aceh, Indonesia. 13 WHO Collaborating Centre for Vector Surveillance and Management, SKLID, CCID, ICDC, China CDC, Beijing, China. 14 Centre for Environment and Population Health, Griffith University, Nathan, Queensland, Australia. 15 Barts and the London School of Medicine, Centre for Primary Care and Public Health, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. 16 Department of Health Services, Ministry of Health, Government of Nepal, Kathmandu, Nepal.

 

Abstract

Asia and its Hindu Kush Himalayan (HKH) region is particularly vulnerable to environmental change, especially climate and land use changes further influenced by rapid population growth, high level of poverty and unsustainable development. Asia has been a hotspot of dengue fever and chikungunya mainly due to its dense human population, unplanned urbanization and poverty. In an urban cycle, dengue virus (DENV) and chikungunya virus (CHIKV) are transmitted by Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes which are also competent vectors of Zika virus (ZIKV). Over the last decade, DENV and CHIKV transmissions by Ae. aegypti have extended to the Himalayan countries of Bhutan and Nepal and ZIKV could follow in the footsteps of these viruses in the HKH region. The already established distribution of human-biting Aedes mosquito vectors and a naïve population with lack of immunity against ZIKV places the HKH region at a higher risk of ZIKV. Some of the countries in the HKH region have already reported ZIKV cases. We have documented an increasing threat of ZIKV in Asia and its HKH region because of the high abundance and wide distribution of human-biting mosquito vectors, climate change, poverty, report of indigenous cases in the region, increasing numbers of imported cases and a naïve population with lack of immunity against ZIKV. An outbreak anywhere is potentially a threat everywhere. Therefore, in order to ensure international health security, all efforts to prevent, detect, and respond to ZIKV ought to be intensified now in Asia and its HKH region. To prepare for possible ZIKV outbreaks, Asia and the HKH region can also learn from the success stories and strategies adopted by other regions and countries in preventing ZIKV and associated complications. The future control strategies for DENV, CHIKV and ZIKV should be considered in tandem with the threat to human well-being that is posed by other emerging and re-emerging vector-borne and zoonotic diseases, and by the continuing urgent need to strengthen public primary healthcare systems in the region.

KEYWORDS: Aedes aegypti; Aedes albopictus; Chikungunya virus; Dengue virus; Hindu Kush Himalayas; Mountain; Poverty, Zika virus

PMID: 29759076 DOI: 10.1186/s40249-018-0426-3

Keywords: Arbovirus; Dengue Fever; Chikungunya Fever; Zika Virus; Mosquitoes; Asia Region; Aedes spp.

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gimi69

I am an Italian blogger, active since 2005 with main focus on emerging infectious diseases such as avian influenza, SARS, antibiotics resistance, and many other global Health issues. Other fields of interest are: climate change, global warming, geological and biological sciences. My activity consists mainly in collection and analysis of news, public services updates, confronting sources and making decision about what are the 'signals' of an impending crisis (an outbreak, for example). When a signal is detected, I follow traces during the entire course of an event. I started in 2005 my blog ''A TIME'S MEMORY'', now with more than 40,000 posts and 3 millions of web interactions. Subsequently I added an Italian Language blog, then discontinued because of very low traffic and interest. I contributed for seven years to a public forum (FluTrackers.com) in the midst of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014, I left the site to continue alone my data tracking job.

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