#Origins of the current #outbreak of #MDR #malaria in southeast #Asia: a retrospective genetic study (Lancet Infect Dis., abstract)

[Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Origins of the current outbreak of multidrug-resistant malaria in southeast Asia: a retrospective genetic study

Roberto Amato, PhD, Richard D Pearson, PhD, Jacob Almagro-Garcia, PhD, Chanaki Amaratunga, PhD, Pharath Lim, MD, Seila Suon, MD, Sokunthea Sreng, Eleanor Drury, Sc, Jim Stalker, MA, Olivo Miotto, PhD, Rick M Fairhurst, MD, Prof Dominic P Kwiatkowski, FRCP

Published: 01 February 2018 / Open Access / DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(18)30068-9

© 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.

 

Summary

Background

Antimalarial resistance is rapidly spreading across parts of southeast Asia where dihydroartemisinin–piperaquine is used as first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The first published reports about resistance to antimalarial drugs came from western Cambodia in 2013. Here, we analyse genetic changes in the P falciparum population of western Cambodia in the 6 years before those reports.

Methods

We analysed genome sequence data on 1492 P falciparum samples from 11 locations across southeast Asia, including 464 samples collected in western Cambodia between 2007 and 2013. Different epidemiological origins of resistance were identified by haplotypic analysis of the kelch13artemisinin resistance locus and the plasmepsin 2–3 piperaquine resistance locus.

Findings

We identified more than 30 independent origins of artemisinin resistance, of which the KEL1 lineage accounted for 140 (91%) of 154 parasites resistant to dihydroartemisinin–piperaquine. In 2008, KEL1 combined with PLA1, the major lineage associated with piperaquine resistance. By 2013, the KEL1/PLA1 co-lineage had reached a frequency of 63% (24/38) in western Cambodia and had spread to northern Cambodia.

Interpretation

The KEL1/PLA1 co-lineage emerged in the same year that dihydroartemisinin–piperaquine became the first-line antimalarial drug in western Cambodia and spread rapidly thereafter, displacing other artemisinin-resistant parasite lineages. These findings have important implications for management of the global health risk associated with the current outbreak of multidrug-resistant malaria in southeast Asia.

Funding

Wellcome Trust, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Medical Research Council, UK Department for International Development, and the Intramural Research Program of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

Keywords: Malaria; Asia Region; Antibiotics; Drugs Resistance; Artemisin; Piperaquine.

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Published by

Giuseppe Michieli

I am an Italian blogger, active since 2005 with main focus on emerging infectious diseases such as avian influenza, SARS, antibiotics resistance, and many other global Health issues. Other fields of interest are: climate change, global warming, geological and biological sciences. My activity consists mainly in collection and analysis of news, public services updates, confronting sources and making decision about what are the 'signals' of an impending crisis (an outbreak, for example). When a signal is detected, I follow traces during the entire course of an event. I started in 2005 my blog ''A TIME'S MEMORY'', now with more than 40,000 posts and 3 millions of web interactions. Subsequently I added an Italian Language blog, then discontinued because of very low traffic and interest. I contributed for seven years to a public forum (FluTrackers.com) in the midst of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014, I left the site to continue alone my data tracking job.

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