Isolation and sequencing of #Dashli virus, a novel #Sicilian-like virus in #sandflies from #Iran; genetic and phylogenetic evidence for the creation of one novel species within the Phlebovirus genus in the Bunyaviridae family (PLoS Negl Trop Dis., abstract)

[Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

OPEN ACCESS /  PEER-REVIEWED / RESEARCH ARTICLE

Isolation and sequencing of Dashli virus, a novel Sicilian-like virus in sandflies from Iran; genetic and phylogenetic evidence for the creation of one novel species within the Phlebovirusgenus in the Bunyaviridae family

Cigdem Alkan , Vahideh Moin Vaziri  , Nazli Ayhan, Mehdi Badakhshan, Laurence Bichaud, Nourina Rahbarian, Ezat-Aldin Javadian, Bulent Alten, Xavier de Lamballerie, Remi N. Charrel

Published: December 27, 2017 / DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0005978 /  This is an uncorrected proof.

 

Abstract

Phlebotomine sandflies are vectors of phleboviruses that cause sandfly fever or meningitis with significant implications for public health. Although several strains of these viruses had been isolated in Iran in the late 1970’s, there was no recent data about the present situation at the outset of this study. Entomological investigations performed in 2009 and 2011 in Iran collected 4,770 sandflies from 10 different regions. Based on morphological identification, they were sorted into 315 pools according to species, sex, trapping station and date of capture. A phlebovirus, provisionally named Dashli virus (DASHV), was isolated from one pool of Sergentomyia spp, and subsequently DASHV RNA was detected in a second pool of Phlebotomus papatasi. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses based on complete coding genomic sequences indicated that (i) DASHV is most closely related to the Iranian isolates of Sandfly fever Sicilian virus [SFSV], (ii) there is a common ancestor to DASHV, Sandfly fever Sicilian- (SFS) and SFS-like viruses isolated in Italy, India, Turkey, and Cyprus (lineage I), (iii) DASHV is more distantly related with Corfou and Toros viruses (lineage II) although common ancestry is supported with 100% bootstrap, (iii) lineage I can be subdivided into sublineage Ia including all SFSV, SFCV and SFTV except those isolated in Iran which forms sublineage Ib (DASHV). Accordingly, we suggest to approve Sandfly fever Sicilian virus species consisting of the all aforementioned viruses. Owing that most of these viruses have been identified in human patients with febrile illness, DASHV should be considered as a potential human pathogen in Iran.

 

Author summary

Phlebotomine sandflies are vectors of phleboviruses that cause sandfly fever or meningitis with significant implications for public health. Although several strains of these viruses had been isolated in Iran in the late 1970’s, there was no recent data about the present situation at the outset of this study. Entomological investigations performed in 2009 and 2011 in Iran collected 4,770 sandflies from 10 different regions. A phlebovirus, provisionally named Dashli virus (DASHV), was isolated / detected in two pools. DASHV strain was isolated in cell culture and complete genome sequence was determined. Sequence analysis indicated that (i) DASHV is most closely related to the Iranian isolates of Sandfly fever Sicilian virus [SFSV], a virus that is known to cause self-resolutive incapacitating febrile illness in humans, (ii) there is a common ancestor to DASHV and all other variants of SFSV isolated in Italy, India, Turkey, and Cyprus (lineage I), (iii) DASHV is more distantly related with Corfou and Toros viruses (lineage II) although common ancestry is supported with 100% bootstrap, (iii) lineage I can be subdivided into sublineage Ia including all SFSV strains, whereas Iranian viruses are most closely related and should be individualized as DASHV (sublineage Ib). Although discovered first in the 1940’s, SFSV is still listed as “tentative species” by the International Committee for Taxonomy of Viruses. Based on the results described in this study, we propose to approve Sandfly fever Sicilian virus species. Owing that most of these viruses have been identified in human patients with febrile illness, DASHV should be considered as a potential human pathogen in Iran.

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Citation: Alkan C, Moin Vaziri V, Ayhan N, Badakhshan M, Bichaud L, Rahbarian N, et al. (2017) Isolation and sequencing of Dashli virus, a novel Sicilian-like virus in sandflies from Iran; genetic and phylogenetic evidence for the creation of one novel species within the Phlebovirus genus in the Bunyaviridae family. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 11(12): e0005978. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0005978

Editor: Mary Ann McDowell, University of Notre Dame, UNITED STATES

Received: January 19, 2017; Accepted: September 20, 2017; Published: December 27, 2017

Copyright: © 2017 Alkan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Data Availability: All relevant data are within the paper and its Supporting Information files.

Funding: This work was supported through funds received from EU grant FP7-261504 EDENext and this paper is catalogued by the EDENext Steering Committee as EDENext???(http://www.edenext.eu), the European Virus Archive goes Global (EVAg) project in the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 653316 (http://global.european-virus-archive.com/). The work of RNC and BA was done under the frame of EurNegVec (TD1303) COST Action. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Competing interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Keywords: Phlebovirus; Bunyavirus; Sandflies; Iran; Dashly Virus; Viral Meningitis.

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Giuseppe Michieli

I am an Italian blogger, active since 2005 with main focus on emerging infectious diseases such as avian influenza, SARS, antibiotics resistance, and many other global Health issues. Other fields of interest are: climate change, global warming, geological and biological sciences. My activity consists mainly in collection and analysis of news, public services updates, confronting sources and making decision about what are the 'signals' of an impending crisis (an outbreak, for example). When a signal is detected, I follow traces during the entire course of an event. I started in 2005 my blog ''A TIME'S MEMORY'', now with more than 40,000 posts and 3 millions of web interactions. Subsequently I added an Italian Language blog, then discontinued because of very low traffic and interest. I contributed for seven years to a public forum (FluTrackers.com) in the midst of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014, I left the site to continue alone my data tracking job.