#Socioeconomic #status and #impact of the #economic #crisis on #dietary #habits in #Italy: results from the INHES study (J Public Health, abstract)

[Source: Journal of Public Health, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Socioeconomic status and impact of the economic crisis on dietary habits in Italy: results from the INHES study

Marialaura Bonaccio, Augusto Di Castelnuovo, Americo Bonanni, Simona Costanzo, Mariarosaria Persichillo, Chiara Cerletti, Maria Benedetta Donati, Giovanni de Gaetano, Licia Iacoviello, on behalf of the INHES Study Investigators on behalf of the INHES Study Investigators

Journal of Public Health, https://doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdx144

Published: 08 November 2017 – Received: 11 May 2017 – Revision Received: 07 September 2017 – Accepted: 10 October 2017

Citation: Marialaura Bonaccio, Augusto Di Castelnuovo, Americo Bonanni, Simona Costanzo, Mariarosaria Persichillo, Chiara Cerletti, Maria Benedetta Donati, Giovanni de Gaetano, Licia Iacoviello, on behalf of the INHES Study Investigators; Socioeconomic status and impact of the economic crisis on dietary habits in Italy: results from the INHES study, Journal of Public Health, https://doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdx144

© 2017 Oxford University Press

 

Abstract

Background

There is lack of evidence about the likely impact of the economic crisis on dietary habits in Western societies. We aimed to assess dietary modifications that possibly occurred during the recession and to investigate major socioeconomic factors associated with such modifications.

Methods

Cross-sectional analysis on 1829 subjects from the general population recruited in the larger INHES study (n = 9319) a telephone-based survey on nutrition and health conducted in Italy from 2010 to 2013. Association of socioeconomic (education, household income, occupation) with self-reported impact of the economic crisis on dietary habits was tested by multivariable logistic regression analysis.

Results

Low-educated subjects (OR = 2.30; 95% CI: 1.39–3.80), those with poor income (OR = 5.71; 95% CI: 3.68–8.85), and unemployed (OR = 3.93; 95% CI: 1.62–9.56) had higher odds of reporting undesirable dietary changes due to recession. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was lower in subjects reporting a negative impact of the crisis on diet as compared to those declaring no effect, whereas the quality of grocery items was higher in the latter.

Conclusions

Undesirable dietary changes due to the economic crisis were mainly reported by lower socioeconomic groups. Subjects perceiving a negative impact of the recession on their diet also showed a lower adherence to Mediterranean diet and reduced quality of grocery products.

epidemiology, food and nutrition, socioeconomics factors

Issue Section: Original Article

© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

Keywords: Society; Poverty; Public Health; Italy; Economic Recession.

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Giuseppe Michieli

I am an Italian blogger, active since 2005 with main focus on emerging infectious diseases such as avian influenza, SARS, antibiotics resistance, and many other global Health issues. Other fields of interest are: climate change, global warming, geological and biological sciences. My activity consists mainly in collection and analysis of news, public services updates, confronting sources and making decision about what are the 'signals' of an impending crisis (an outbreak, for example). When a signal is detected, I follow traces during the entire course of an event. I started in 2005 my blog ''A TIME'S MEMORY'', now with more than 40,000 posts and 3 millions of web interactions. Subsequently I added an Italian Language blog, then discontinued because of very low traffic and interest. I contributed for seven years to a public forum (FluTrackers.com) in the midst of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014, I left the site to continue alone my data tracking job.