#Inoculation of #Goats, #Sheep, and #Horses with #MERS-CoV Does Not Result in Productive Viral Shedding (Viruses, abstract)

[Source: US National Library of Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Viruses. 2016 Aug 19;8(8). pii: E230.

Inoculation of Goats, Sheep, and Horses with MERS-CoV Does Not Result in Productive Viral Shedding.

Adney DR1, Brown VR2, Porter SM3, Bielefeldt-Ohmann H4, Hartwig AE5, Bowen RA6,7.

Author information: 1Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80521, USA. danielle.adney@colostate.edu. 2Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80521, USA. vienna.brown@colostate.edu. 3Department of Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA. stephanie.porter@colostate.edu. 4School of Veterinary Science, University of Queensland, Gatton, QLD 4343, Australia. h.bielefeldtohmann1@uq.edu.au. 5Department of Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA. airn.hartwig@colostate.edu. 6Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80521, USA. Richard.Bowen@colostate.edu. 7Department of Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA. Richard.Bowen@colostate.edu.

 

Abstract

The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was first recognized in 2012 and can cause severe disease in infected humans. Dromedary camels are the reservoir for the virus, although, other than nasal discharge, these animals do not display any overt clinical disease. Data from in vitro experiments suggest that other livestock such as sheep, goats, and horses might also contribute to viral transmission, although field data has not identified any seropositive animals. In order to understand if these animals could be infected, we challenged young goats and horses and adult sheep with MERS-CoV by intranasal inoculation. Minimal or no virus shedding was detected in all of the animals. During the four weeks following inoculation, neutralizing antibodies were detected in the young goats, but not in sheep or horses.

KEYWORDS: MERS; goat; horse; reservoir host; sheep

PMID: 27548203 DOI: 10.3390/v8080230

[PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Keywords: Research; Abstracts; MERS-CoV; Horses; Goats; Sheeps.

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gimi69

I am an Italian blogger, active since 2005 with main focus on emerging infectious diseases such as avian influenza, SARS, antibiotics resistance, and many other global Health issues. Other fields of interest are: climate change, global warming, geological and biological sciences. My activity consists mainly in collection and analysis of news, public services updates, confronting sources and making decision about what are the 'signals' of an impending crisis (an outbreak, for example). When a signal is detected, I follow traces during the entire course of an event. I started in 2005 my blog ''A TIME'S MEMORY'', now with more than 40,000 posts and 3 millions of web interactions. Subsequently I added an Italian Language blog, then discontinued because of very low traffic and interest. I contributed for seven years to a public forum (FluTrackers.com) in the midst of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014, I left the site to continue alone my data tracking job.

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