Developing #Global #Norms for #Sharing #Data and #Results during #Public #Health #Emergencies (PLoS Med., abstract)

[Source: PLoS Medicine, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Open Access / Policy Forum

Developing Global Norms for Sharing Data and Results during Public Health Emergencies [      ]

Kayvon Modjarrad,  Vasee S. Moorthy,  Piers Millett,  Pierre-Stéphane Gsell,  Cathy Roth,  Marie-Paule Kieny

Published: January 5, 2016 / DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001935

Citation: Modjarrad K, Moorthy VS, Millett P, Gsell P-S, Roth C, Kieny M-P (2016) Developing Global Norms for Sharing Data and Results during Public Health Emergencies. PLoS Med 13(1): e1001935. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001935

Published: January 5, 2016

Copyright: © 2016 Modjarrad et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited

Funding: The Wellcome Trust contributed towards the cost of the consultation. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Competing interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Provenance: Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed

 

Summary Points

  • Leading stakeholders from around the world convened at a WHO consultation in September 2015, where they affirmed that timely and transparent sharing of data and results during public health emergencies must become the global norm.
  • Representatives from major biomedical journals who attended the meeting agreed that public disclosure of information of relevance to public health emergencies should not be delayed by publication timelines and that early disclosure should not and will not prejudice later journal publication.
  • Researchers should be responsible for the accuracy of shared preliminary results, ensuring that they have been subjected to sufficient quality control before public dissemination.
  • Opting in to data sharing should be the default practice, and the onus should be placed on data generators and stewards at the local, national, and international level to explain any decision to opt out from sharing data and results during public health emergencies.
  • Incentives for sharing data should be created and tailored for each type of data generator and steward, while data management and analysis expertise is enhanced in under-resourced settings.

(…)

Keywords: Research; Abstracts; Public Health; Global Health; Emerging Diseases.

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Published by

gimi69

I am an Italian blogger, active since 2005 with main focus on emerging infectious diseases such as avian influenza, SARS, antibiotics resistance, and many other global Health issues. Other fields of interest are: climate change, global warming, geological and biological sciences. My activity consists mainly in collection and analysis of news, public services updates, confronting sources and making decision about what are the 'signals' of an impending crisis (an outbreak, for example). When a signal is detected, I follow traces during the entire course of an event. I started in 2005 my blog ''A TIME'S MEMORY'', now with more than 40,000 posts and 3 millions of web interactions. Subsequently I added an Italian Language blog, then discontinued because of very low traffic and interest. I contributed for seven years to a public forum (FluTrackers.com) in the midst of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014, I left the site to continue alone my data tracking job.

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